2014 Collection of Official Languages Resources

Author: Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

Date: 2014

ISSN: 1929-7572 Collection of Official Languages Resources

 

Message from the Clerk of the Privy Council

Wayne G. Wouters

Hello! Bonjour!

I am delighted to celebrate Linguistic Duality Day again as this year marks the 45th anniversary of the Official Languages Act. On the second Thursday in September, we come together to commemorate our country's founding principles and rich heritage as a bilingual country. Canada's two official languages are fundamental elements of our public service.

As you know, excellence is our goal in the design and delivery of public sector policy, programs and services. Last June, I launched Blueprint 2020, a government-wide dialogue on a vision for a world-class Public Service, equipped to serve Canada and Canadians now and into the future. This unprecedented and historic process allowed employees across the country to offer unfiltered and fresh ideas on how to transform the public service. Public servants are committed to excellence and are passionate about their country. They are also proud of our capability to extensively serve Canadians in both official languages as this has a direct impact on the lives and well-being of citizens.

In Destination 2020, the report that highlights various innovative ideas generated by public servants through the Blueprint 2020 process, some of the initiatives proposed are aimed at enhancing tools and the capacity for learning official languages. The Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, the Canada School of Public Service and the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions will work with the official languages community to identify innovative and effective ways to allow employees to enhance and maintain their second language skills. These initiatives will help create a bilingual work environment and will contribute to building and maintaining a bilingual workforce.

As indicated in my Twenty-First Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada, modernizing the Federal Public Service is only possible if we tap into the creativity of our employees who have a keen understanding of where there are opportunities for innovation. Once again, you have demonstrated your creativity and commitment to linguistic duality in this new and expanded edition of the 2014 Collection of Official Languages Resources, published by the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions. The quality and quantity of ideas generated in this Collection are inspirational and have a real impact in serving Canadians and the Government with excellence, integrity, and pride.

I encourage you to make use and share these valuable resources. They can be used directly or as models to promote and advance the Official Languages Program in your own workplace.

Thank you for joining me in celebrating Linguistic Duality Day 2014 and for your continued efforts in helping to build tomorrow's Public Service.

 

Wayne G. Wouters


Message from the Co-Chairs of the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

Donna Achimov Steven Morgan

Hello! Bonjour!

Thank you for joining us in celebrating Linguistic Duality Day once again this year as we celebrate the 45th anniversary of the Official Languages Act. It's been a wonderful and productive year and we are extremely proud of our many achievements.

In October 2013, the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions contributed to the Blueprint 2020 exercise with its submission to the Clerk of the Privy Council entitled "Leveraging Bilingualism in the Public Service of the Future". Thank you to the many public servants who shared their thoughts and views with us. Across the Public Service, there is a desire for more freedom and less rigidity in how we practice bilingualism and think about official languages.

Language is one of the most powerful workplace tools we have. When a workforce has two languages to work with for sharing views, conveying information and expressing ideas, there's enormous potential to communicate more effectively, expand imagination, generate better ideas and increase workforce productivity.

The Blueprint 2020 vision is based on the argument that engagement, collaboration, effective teamwork and professional development are all essential to high-performing organizations. The Council wholeheartedly agrees. We also believe that one of the greatest assets the Public Service already has is its bilingual capacity in French and English and that this powerful cultural asset is integral to the Blueprint 2020 vision. We are proudly bilingual and we must protect, enhance and leverage this competitive advantage as we look to the future.

Building and supporting the public service of the future means we must push the boundaries and draw inspiration from the successes achieved with respect to official languages. To this end, we are proud to share with you the 2014 Collection of Official Languages Resources, which gives you one-stop access to a wide range of official languages tools, resources and best practices that reflect the collective efforts and experience of the community of official language practitioners.

The 2014 Collection contains many more innovative resources—everything from practical tools to help employees use both official languages in their work to guides and tools that have been developed for official languages planning, plus training resources and much more. We invite you to take advantage of the wealth of information that has been made available to you in this Collection and to encourage your colleagues to do so, too.

Looking ahead to an updated Collection next year, I would also like to invite you to continue to share your accomplishments and success stories with us for the fifth edition. Please contact Diane Lalonde-Spring, the National Coordinator of the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions, at diane.lalonde-spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca or 613-952-3014 to provide your input.

The Council of the Network sincerely thanks you for your leadership, innovation and collaborative work. Linguistic duality is clearly an integral part of our shared vision of Canada's public service!

 

Donna Achimov and Steven Morgan


Advancement of English and French (Part VII of the OLA)

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

1. RDÉEACOA Committee

This committee is a collaborative body composed of members of the Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité (RDÉE) and ACOA. Each affiliate organization from each of the four Atlantic provinces has a representative on the committee, which serves as a means of gathering feedback from the official language minority communities (OLMCs) on how the government is responding to their needs in the area of economic development. The committee meets three times a year, on average, and maintains a constant dialogue with the OLMCs. The creation of the committee is a best practice that yields positive results, as it provides a forum for exchanging information on the development of an economic strategy with the OLMCs in Atlantic Canada.

Gerry.Morrissey@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-850-2295

2. Regional Coordinators Committee—Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act

This committee is responsible for ACOA's implementation of Part VII of the Act. Each regional office is represented on the committee by coordinators responsible for issues related to Part VII of the Act. The committee serves many purposes, including evaluating project proposals from the community under the Economic Development Initiative, considering policy and program issues at ACOA from an official-languages perspective and maintaining a dialogue with official language minority communities.

Nicole.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-874-2279

3. Regional Coordinator's Guide—Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act

The Agency developed this guide to serve as an orientation tool for account managers in their role as regional coordinators in the implementation of Part VII of the Act. The guide covers the November 2005 amendment to the Act and implementation of Part VII and includes the tools provided by Canadian Heritage. The guide also outlines the Agency's Official Languages Policy, the coordinators' role (particularly their role on the RDÉEACOA Committee), the workings of the various committees, the Agency's action plan and report on achievements, and other relevant information.

Nicole.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-874-2279

Atlantic Federal Council (Prince Edward Island)

4. Forum on Part VII of the Official Languages Act: "Official Languages…Interaction Leads to Understanding"

A tripartite forum on Part VII of the Act was held in June 2011. This forum was attended by representatives of the federal and provincial governments and the Francophone minority community. The objectives of the forum included a presentation on sections 41 and 42 of Part VII of the Act, an exchange of best practices between federal and provincial representatives and a dialogue between the community and the federal and provincial organizations in Prince Edward Island.

Faith.McIntyre@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-566-8139

British Columbia Federal Council

5. Annual Consultation with Official Language Minority Communities

The British Columbia Federal Council organizes an annual consultation with the official language minority communities of the Pacific on the second Friday in November. The event precedes the annual general assembly of the Federation of Francophones of British Columbia and enables a dialogue between the official language minority communities and the Official Languages Committee of the British Columbia Federal Council.

Alexandre.Deporcq@csps-efpc.gc.ca, 604-666-0106

6. Celebration of the Francophonie in Vancouver

As part of Les Rendez-vous de la Francophonie, the British Columbia Federal Council, in partnership with the Francophone community of British Columbia, participates in the organization of the "Celebration of Francophonie in Vancouver." This event takes place on March 20, the official Day of the Francophonie in British Columbia, as well as the official Journée internationale de la Francophonie. The event includes a trade show with information kiosks for the public and for federal employees, the presentation of the Official Languages Award of Excellence from the British Columbia Federal Council and the Cornouiller d'or award from the Fédération des Francophones de la Colombie-Britannique, as well as various activities highlighting the artistic creativity of the Francophone community of British Columbia. The celebration brings together various partners in about 40 kiosks, including federal departments and agencies, as well as provincial agencies, Francophone organizations and community groups from British Columbia.

Alexandre.Deporcq@csps-efpc.gc.ca, 604-666-0106

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

7. Partnership with Collège Boréal

In 2011, a partnership between the CBSA and Collège Boréal was established to train border services officers from the CBSA's Southern Ontario Region in their second language. This partnership is a success, as it allows officers to receive language training and thus improve their second language skills. Thanks to this partnership, the CBSA has established a close relationship with representatives of the French community in southern Ontario, raised awareness of the hiring process and determined what changes should be made to better reflect their reality. This partnership is going well; in 2013–2014, 10 officers were trained.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

8. Presentation on Part VII of the Official Languages Act and Official Language Minority Communities

A presentation called "Focus on Linguistic Communities" was uploaded to the CBSA's intranet and sent to the Agency's regional offices to assist them in their implementation of Part VII of the Act. This tool provides an overview of the official language minority communities (OLMCs) across Canada and outlines several regional CBSA initiatives that support the vitality of OLMCs. It also includes tips and a wealth of resources promoting the implementation of best practices.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development (CED)

9. Business Offices' Official Languages Liaison Officers

CED has a network of official languages liaison officers in their business offices. They are the intermediaries between official languages coordinators and employees in the regions.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

10. Manager's Guide for Implementing Part VII of the Official Languages Act

This tool provides managers with information on their responsibilities under Part VII of the Act, how to meet these responsibilities and the impact of Part VII on their programs.

Lise.Boulay@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-957-7083

11. Official Language Minority Communities Interview Questionnaire

This questionnaire, entitled "Interview with the Association Representing the Official Language Minority Communities," is used by CRA regional representatives to guide their discussions with representatives of the OLMCs, so that they can identify the communities' needs within the CRA's mandate.

Lise.Boulay@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-957-7083

12. Part VII Checklist for Reviewing Operations

This tool helps managers review the impact of their programs on official language minority communities and assesses the full recognition of the use of English and French in their programs.

Lise.Boulay@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-957-7083

13. Partnerships with English Educational Institutions

To increase the representation of Anglophones in the CRA's Quebec Region workforce, the Quebec Regional Call Centre has partnered with Concordia University and the Dawson Cégep, both English-speaking institutions, on a co-op program aimed at recruiting Anglophone students. The program gives students an opportunity to acquire practical and relevant work experience while fulfilling their study program requirements. It also allows the CRA to contribute to the development of English-speaking communities in Quebec by playing the role of responsible corporate employer in these communities. In 2009, this initiative received Concordia University's Outstanding Commitment to CO-OP Award.

Lucie.Veilleux@cra-arc.gc.ca, 514-496-8318

14. Student Ambassador Program

The CRA's Quebec Region has a student ambassador at Concordia University, who conducts various activities, including hosting information booths, in order to inform students of career possibilities in the CRA and the advantages of working at the Agency.

Lucie.Veilleux@cra-arc.gc.ca, 514-496-8318

15. Tour of Surrey Offices

A tour of the Agency's three offices located in Surrey was given to a representative from the Office of Francophone and Francophile Affairs at Simon Fraser University. Two bilingual team leaders gave the tour and information on bilingual employment opportunities was presented by the Corporate Learning Advisor.

Adrienne.Bozsik@cra-arc.gc.ca, 604-775-5672

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

16. Creation of a Generic Presentation on the Agency's Responsibilities towards Official Languages.

The CFIA developed a generic presentation that also includes its responsibilities towards official languages. This presentation is used for the promotion of the Agency by official language minority communities. The presentation will be given by champions to the communities to explore which actions could be put in place to better serve them with respect to the CFIA mandate.

Fotini.Bozionelos@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-5860

Canadian Heritage

17. Interdepartmental Networks of Official Languages Coordinators Contributing to the Implementation of Section 41 (Part VII) of the Official Languages Act in the Regions

British Columbia

Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages Coordinators—British Columbia (INOLC–BC)

Isabelle.Major@pch.gc.ca, 604-666-6933

Alberta

Interdepartmental Official Languages Network of Alberta

This network focuses on the implementation of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Derick.McNeil@pch.gc.ca, 604-666-2454

Saskatchewan

Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages Coordinators—Saskatchewan (INOLC–S)

This network focuses on the implementation of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Frederique.Baudemont@pch.gc.ca, 306-975-5800

Manitoba

Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages—Manitoba (INOL–M)

This network focuses on the implementation of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Diane.Dorge@pch.gc.ca, 204-984-4875

Ontario

Ontario Official Languages Interdepartmental Network (OOLIN)

This network focuses on the implementation of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Sylvie.Paradis@pch.gc.ca, 416-952-2647

Quebec

Interdepartmental Official Languages Network

This network focuses on the implementation of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Jacqueline.Ritchi@pch.gc.ca, 514-283-5895

Working Group on Arts, Culture and Heritage with the English-Speaking Communities of Quebec

Jacqueline.Ritchi@pch.gc.ca, 514-283-5895

Atlantic section 41 Network

This network of regional coordinators is responsible for the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act in the Atlantic provinces.

New-Brunswick

Raphaelle.Valay-Nadeau@pch.gc.ca, 506-851-2302

Prince Edward Island

Marie-Claire.Caouette@pch.gc.ca, 506-851-2302

Nova Scotia

Martin.Paquet@pch.gc.ca, 902-426-8394

Newfoundland and Labrador

James.Prowse@pch.gc.ca, 709-772-5645

18. Support for the Implementation of Part VII of the Official Languages Act

Canadian Heritage helps federal departments and agencies fully contribute to the implementation of Part VII of the Act. The Department coordinates the national network of contact persons for the implementation of section 41 of the Act in federal organizations, facilitates relations between communities and federal organizations and produces a range of information tools, including the following:

  • One-pager "A glance at section 41 of the Official Languages Act"
  • Guide on Part VII—Implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act
  • Capitalizing on its full potential—Implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act
  • Good practices—Implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act
  • Good practices—Fostering the recognition and use of both English and French in Canadian society
  • Tool for reflection on optimizing the contribution of a federal organization, on the basis of its mandate
  • Official Languages Annual Report—Achievements of Designated Federal Institutions—Implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act
  • One-pager "The Canadian Francophonie".

Many of the tools for the implementation of section 41 of the Act can be found on GCpedia.

Mara.Indri-Skinner@pch.gc.ca, 819-994-3577

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC)

19. Document: Best Practices Manual on Francophone Immigration in Canada

This collection of best practices—an innovative tool developed in 2010 by the Metropolis Project in conjunction with the Ministerial Conference on the Canadian Francophonie—is a clear demonstration of the proactive approach taken by the various players from across the country to develop integrated services for Francophone clients. This manual sets out a comprehensive continuum of objectives, actions and results—from community promotion to immigrant recruitment, integration and retention—and reflects the richness of these initiatives.

Kyle.Cyr@cic.gc.ca, 613-960-1008

20. Francophone Immigration Networks

CIC currently supports 13 Francophone immigration networks (FINs) within Francophone minority communities across the country in order to solidify and strengthen efforts to economically, socially and culturally integrate French-speaking immigrants. The FINs focus their energies on the following local and regional activities: collaboration with stakeholders; identification of needs; development of plans and adapted strategies, and support for communities in implementing the plans and strategies.

Kyle.Cyr@cic.gc.ca, 613-960-1008

21. Francophone Immigration Outside Quebec Webpage

Located on CIC's website, this page provides information on Francophone communities in Canada and all the services available to newcomers to these communities. This page is regularly revised to ensure that all the information and links posted on it are current. It also includes a link to a tool available on CIC's site, directing newcomers to free settlement services. In addition, a home page was created to promote greater visibility for the Francophone Immigration Outside Quebec page.

Kyle.Cyr@cic.gc.ca, 613-960-1008

Community Health and Social Services Network (CHSSN)

22. Community Development in English-Speaking Communities in Québec: Lessons Learned from a Participatory Action Research Project

This community development project was carried out from 2009 to 2013 at the Institut national de santé publique in collaboration with the CHSSN. The project objectives were three-fold: to increase knowledge on English-speaking communities in Québec; to develop tools for mobilizing these communities; to support English-speaking communities in implementing a community development approach. The project summary report discusses the conceptual framework for the project as well as the methodology used, followed by portraits of six communities that were studied, reflections on community portraits as a participatory action research method and some lessons learned regarding community development among English-speaking communities in Québec.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

23. Community Health Education Program and Tools

The Community Health Education Program has made it possible to improve access to a range of English-language health and social information in one's community via a variety of mediums: videoconferencing; telephone conferencing; DVD's; community radio (Internet access); and follow-up activities. Many of the community health education tools are available for reference directly from the CHSSN website.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

24. Community Health Promotion Projects

The Community Health Promotion Projects Program aims to improve access to activities and programs promoting health and disease prevention by reinforcing the community sector working with the health and social services centres and public health programs. The program addresses the needs of vulnerable English-speaking groups through activities and programs that promote health and disease prevention; and information in the areas of public health or related programs, such as seniors and persons with loss of autonomy, youth and families, mental health and drug and alcohol addiction. For more information, visit the CHSSN website.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

25. Community Mobilization Model for Improving the Health and Vitality of English-speaking Communities in Quebec

This model was designed to communicate the approach taken by nineteen community health and social services networks which positions them as drivers of change in mobilizing English-speaking communities. These community health and social services networks implement three key action strategies: improving access to health and social services, increasing the availability of health promotion and disease prevention programs, and fostering social innovation. This work is rooted in a number of principles and values that guide the development of the networks, with the ultimate aim of improving the health and well-being of English-speaking communities in Quebec and enhancing community vitality. For more information, please visit the CHSSN website.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

Consortium national de formation en santé (CNFS)

26. Educational Roadmap for Health Services in French [Itinéraire d'études en santé en français]

This information tool is designed for parents, guidance counsellors and teachers of grade 9 to 12 students who want to help them choose a health care career in French. The CNFS (Web site not available in English) has developed this tool to help nurture the next generation of health professionals able to serve Francophones across Canada.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

27. Health Care Study Programs in French [Liste des programmes d'études en santé en français]

This reference provides a list of all current French-language postsecondary health programs sponsored by Health Canada through the Consortium national de formation en santé (Web site not available in English).

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

28. Literature Review of Research on the Health of Official Language Minority Communities

This study, prepared in the context of the 2011 Symposium on Official Languages Research, reviews research activities pertaining to the health of official language minority communities in Canada between 2008 and 2011. Its purpose is to (1) communicate and discuss the current state of official languages research within the health sector, (2) identify gaps and research themes that are relevant for the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-2018: Education, Immigration, Communities, and (3) establish a common approach for consolidating and accessing research data on official languages in Canada. For more information on the CNFS, please visit their website (Web site not available in English).

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

29. Professional Excellence Program [Programme d'excellence professionnelle]

The Professional Excellence Program of the CNFS (Web site not available in English) sponsors noon hour seminars on selected topics of interest to health professionals at the Montfort Hospital and across Eastern Ontario. Seminars are held at the Consortium facilities located within University of Ottawa and the Montfort Hospital and are broadcast on demand to videoconferencing sites located within the colleges and universities across Canada that are members or partners of the Consortium.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

Department of National Defence

30. Defence Administrative Orders and Directives (DAOD) 5039-3: "Support to Official Language Minority Communities and Recognition of English and French in Canadian Society"

Published in July 2010, this directive was developed under Part VII of the Official Languages Act. It aims to encourage corporate stakeholders (i.e. Level 1 coordinators, commanders, managers and employees responsible for developing policies and programs) to take positive measures in support of official language minority communities. These measures include awareness campaigns, consultations and communication.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-995-8963

Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada (FCFA)

31. Community Profiles

Profiles of the Francophone and Acadian Communities of Canada is a compendium of information on Francophone and Acadian communities at the national, provincial and territorial levels. It describes the situation of Canada's Francophonie as a whole and compares the realities of the French fact throughout Canada. Profiles is based on data from the 2006 federal census and is available in both official languages.

Diane Côté, d.cote@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600

32. Community Strategic Plan

One year after the June 2007 Summit of Francophone and Acadian Communities, 40 Francophonie organizations involved in the development of these communities adopted the Community Strategic Plan (Web site not available in English), thus providing a vision for the future of the communities. This 10-year plan for cooperation and mobilization of the Francophone and Acadian communities with respect to the overall results and strategies identified at the summit defines concrete actions to make the summit vision a reality, with short-, medium- and long-term target dates. The plan is the key tool for Francophone and Acadian communities to take charge of their development.

Diane Côté, d.cote@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600

33. Immigration Portal

The portal for immigration (Web site not available in English) in Canada's Francophone and Acadian communities is a gateway to a wealth of information on the communities themselves as well as services and resources for French-speaking immigrants. For over 250 organizations and institutions in various sectors of the Canadian Francophonie, brought together in 13 networks, the portal is also a source of information on all the partners working to recruit, welcome and integrate French-speaking newcomers to Canada.

Marjie Brown, m.brown@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600

34. Map of French Language in Canada

This map, the product of a collaboration between the Ministerial Conference on the Canadian Francophonie and the FCFA , shows at a glance where Canada's French-speaking communities are. It also provides an overview of the communities' vitality at the national and provincial/territorial levels. The map is available in both official languages.

Diane Côté, d.cote@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600

35. The FCFA on Facebook

The FCFA 's Facebook page (Web site not available in English) shows the achievements of Francophone and Acadian communities, provides news about the FCFA and the directions it is taking, and lists interesting articles and resources on La Francophonie and linguistic duality. "Like" our page and gain access to a wealth of information and news about our communities!

Serge Quinty, s.quinty@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600

36. The FCFA on Twitter

The FCFA has two Twitter accounts. The first, @fcfacanada (Web site not available in English), gives live updates on the daily activities of the FCFA and its member organizations. The FCFA is especially prolific during its annual general assemblies and certain major events in which it participates. The second, @fcfaimmigration (Web site not available in English), gives daily updates on recent developments regarding immigration in Francophone and Acadian communities.

Serge Quinty, s.quinty@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600 or Marjie Brown, m.brown@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600

Health Canada

37. Consultation Reports with English and French Linguistic Minority Communities

These reports have helped to lay the foundations of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program, which is one of the elements of the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013–2018: Education, Immigration, Communities. As a result of these consultation reports, Health Canada has created a three-pronged strategy that targets human resources, networking and community health projects and is aimed at improving official language minority communities' access to health services. These reports are available on the Official Language Community Development bureau wiki on Health Canada's intranet and GCpedia.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

38. Official Language Community Development Bureau Wiki

This tool, which can be found on Health Canada's intranet and on GCpedia, provides information to support Health Canada managers and employees with respect to their responsibilities for the development of official language minority communities. All the information provided on the wikis is up to date in both official languages and is a model of bilingual communication in a Web 2.0 context for the Department.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

39. Official Language Minority Communities Studies and Statistics Disseminated or Funded by Health Canada

These studies are Language Barriers in Access to Health Care, prepared by Sarah Bowen for Health Canada, and Health Care Professionals and Official Language Minority Communities in Canada: 2001 and 2006, conducted by Statistics Canada and funded by Health Canada. To improve Anglophone and Francophone minority communities' access to health care, Health Canada has made these documents available as well as a CD-ROM containing statistics on health professionals and Census data on official language minority communities.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

40. Official Languages Health Contribution Program

This program was renewed in March 2013 as part of the federal government's Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-2018: Education, Immigration, Communities. The Program has the following objectives: 1) increased access to bilingual health professionals and intake staff in English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada (EFLMCs); and 2) increased offer of health services for English and French linguistic minority communities within health institutions and communities. A summary of the program is found on the Official Language Community Development Bureau wiki.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

41. Policy to Support Official Language Minority Communities

Health Canada adopted this internal policy in 2004 to encourage its program officials to raise awareness among communities, inform them of program funds that are available and work with them to identify means for improving consultation with them. Under this policy, Health Canada's branches and regional offices providing programs, activities or services for public activities must take into consideration the enhancement of the development of official language minority communities, within the spirit of Part VII of the Official Languages Act.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

Infrastructure Canada (INFC)

42. Engaging Official Language Minority Communities

INFC contributes to the advancement of English and French in Canada by ensuring that communities and non-profit recipients, including official language minority communities (OLMCs), are eligible for funding under infrastructure programs managed by the Department, and by leveraging funding from other levels of government for capital projects that support community development. While the 2014 New Building Canada Fund focuses on infrastructure promoting economic growth, the eligibility of transportation and connectivity investments enables provinces and territories to improve the accessibility of remote communities. The indexed, permanent Gas Tax Fund (2014), designed to address local infrastructure pressures, now includes culture and recreation among its eligible categories of investment, providing an opportunity for local governments to address pressures in key areas of interest to OLMCs. A number of community infrastructure projects funded under INFC 's past programs continue to provide venues for OLMCs to gather and for their culture and language to thrive. These projects have also encouraged the promotion of linguistic duality by exhibiting OLMC culture, history and language to the majority language community.

Kristy.Chapman@infc.gc.ca, 613-960-6389

Justice Canada

43. 2011–2016 Action Plan for the Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act

This is Justice Canada's second five-year action plan for the implementation of section 41 of the Act. It confirms the Department's commitment to act in its areas of responsibility in order to comply with its obligations under section 41 of the Act. The plan differs from the previous one in that it focuses on organizational logic, whereas the previous plan was rooted in community logic. Available online, the 2011–2016 plan also identifies positive steps that go beyond mere compliance with Part VII of the Act.

Michel.Francoeur@justice.gc.ca, 613-954-3187

44. Centre of Expertise—Access to Justice in Official Languages

The Justice in Official Languages (JOL) team is the Department's centre of expertise and reference regarding the application of the departmental policy on the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act (OLA). Department sectors are encouraged to use the JOL team's services, tools and resources. Among other things, the JOL team provides strategic advice aimed at ensuring the implementation of section 41 of the OLA, conducts or supports various types of analysis, such as analyses of various documents in order to evaluate issues from the point of view of the implementation of section 41 of the OLA, and disaggregates analyses according to justice in official languages in studies and evaluations. The JOL team also develops training sessions tailored to the specific needs of sectors and regional offices, including online training, in-person training, and training games and memory aids. They also prepare a variety of PowerPoint presentations, which can be created upon request, in order to inform and educate departmental staff. They manage a SharePoint site, which includes a wealth of resources and data used to support the implementation of section 41 of the OLA, administer a resource centre with more than 1000 publications related to justice in official languages, and collect data on English and French minority communities on a regular basis. The team also uses different modes of communication, including a video on the Centre of Expertise—Access to Justice in Both Official Languages.

Michel.Francoeur@justice.gc.ca, 613-954-3187

45. Departmental Policy Statement

Justice Canada has adopted a policy statement that helps its employees understand the direction established by the Department for the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act. The Department of Justice ensures that those responsible for departmental initiatives within the framework of the Program Alignment Architecture follow the policy. In concrete terms, this means that when implementing organizational strategies, programs and policies, the Department of Justice ensures that the information at the Executive Committee's and staff's disposal allows them to consider the needs and issues of Anglophone and Francophone minority communities in Canada and Canada's objectives of promoting the recognition and use of English and French.

Michel.Francoeur@justice.gc.ca, 613-954-3187

46. "Justice in Official Languages" Newsletter

The Department of Justice puts out an e-newsletter on its activities and initiatives aimed at improving Justice Canada services in both official languages and those of its partners. Access to justice is essential to all communities, including official language minority communities. Published three times a year and distributed to over 550 subscribers, the newsletter comments on various access to justice issues and highlights inspiring practices that are moving access to justice forward in all provinces and territories.

Michel.Francoeur@justice.gc.ca, 613-954-3187

McGill University

47. Training and Retention of Health Professionals Project

The McGill Training and Retention of Health Professionals Project contributes to Quebec's initiatives to ensuring English-speaking Quebecers have access to the full range of health and social services in their own language through measures designed to build and maintain a sufficient complement of health and social services personnel capable of providing services in English. The project is an additional tool to support the implementation and enhancement of regional programs of access to health and social services in English as provided for in the Act respecting health and social services.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

48. Annual Report 2010–2011

Part VII of the Official Languages Act is one of the primary tools for ensuring that linguistic duality remains a value and a characteristic that strengthens our country's unity and contributes to Canada's economic, cultural and social development and international reputation. The 2010–2011 Annual Report of the Commissioner of Official Languages examines the support provided by federal departments and agencies for the development of English-speaking communities in Quebec and French-speaking communities in the rest of Canada, as well as their support for the promotion of linguistic duality in Canadian society. There is no miracle solution or universal cure to ensure that all federal departments and agencies meet their obligations under the Act. Compliance with the Act requires novel approaches and new ways of doing things. Federal organizations must take positive measures by undertaking concrete initiatives.

Nelson.Kalil@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4714

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

49. Regional Official Languages Coordinators

In early 2014, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada established a network of regional Official Languages Coordinators. These coordinators are responsible for Part VII of the Official Languages Act and the establishment of interdepartmental regional cells to foster collaboration between federal institutions in order to meet the needs of minority official languages communities.

Robert.Doyle@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca, 613-952-0267

Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC)

50. Official Languages Toolkits for NCR Tenants

Language toolkits have been given to commercial tenants of PWGSC buildings in Ottawa. From now on, toolkits will also be given to tenants in Gatineau. The toolkit contains language tools, such as a glossary of useful words and expressions; bilingual signage (i.e. "Open/Ouvert" and "Closed/Fermé" signs); badges for practising a second official language (i.e. "Parlez-moi en français s.v.p. J'apprends!"); a leaflet describing language services available to merchants, including low-cost translation services; oral communication workshops given in French and tailored to the service sector; and tips for recruiting bilingual staff. In the same kit, PWGSC provides its commercial tenants with an official languages newsletter in which the Department promotes the Language Portal of Canada as a free, online application and lists the advantages of providing bilingual services.

Linda Van Der Grient, linda.vandergrient@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 819-956-4887

Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN)

51. Facebook Page

The QCGN Facebook page helps spread the word about events organized by the English-speaking community network in Quebec, and encourages informal discussions between fans about issues related to official languages. Pictures of various events, videos and multiple articles can be found on the page. "Like" and follow our page to receive notifications!

Samuel.Lavoie@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044 ext. 257

52. QCGN "Daily Briefing" Electronic Bulletin

The Daily Briefing, which is sent out to more than 800 subscribers every day, contains news about QCGN members and partners throughout the province and includes a press review of issues related to official languages and the English-speaking minority community. It features a searchable archive that allows subscribers to recover past articles. Click here to subscribe.

Samuel.Lavoie@qcgn.ca or info@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044 ext. 257

53. QCGN Website

The QCGN website was revamped in 2010 to better inform its member organizations, provincial and national stakeholders, the media and the public at large. The website is available in both official languages, and its content is constantly updated to reflect issues affecting the development of the English-speaking communities of Quebec. It also contains a great variety of QCGN publications and reports, a media room with press releases and media coverage, a section dedicated to QCGN members, a library containing reference literature, a calendar of upcoming events, and other items, including photos and videos.

Samuel.Lavoie@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044 ext. 257

54. Sheila and Victor Goldbloom Distinguished Community Service Award

In 2009, the Sheila and Victor Goldbloom Distinguished Community Service Award was established by the QCGN to celebrate individuals who have gone above and beyond in contributing to the vitality and understanding of English-speaking Quebec. The award celebrates individuals like Victor and Sheila Goldbloom, who have dedicated their lives to ensuring English-speaking Quebec remains a vibrant community within Quebec and Canada. The award ceremony takes place every October during a celebration of the English-speaking community of Quebec.

Rita.Legault@qcgn.ca or info@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044 ext. 223

55. The Strategic Priorities Forum and the 2012–2017 Community Priorities and Enabling Strategies of the English-speaking Community of Quebec community development plan

The Strategic Priorities Forum is a five-year cyclical process where Quebec's English-speaking community sets its priorities to ensure a vital and sustainable future. Launched in the fall of 2011 with a series of consultations in various regions and sectors of the province, it culminated in a Community Priority Setting Conference on March 23, 2012, where more than 200 community leaders and members achieved consensus on community priorities that would lead the community to a more sustainable and vital future. The QCGN 's Priority Setting Steering Committee (PSSC), which led the process, signed a Declaration of the English-speaking Community of Quebec, which urged the community to work individually and collectively in a collaborative environment to develop and implement strategies that support these priorities. Following the conference, the QCGN and the PSSC also created a community development plan entitled 2012–2017 Community Priorities and Enabling Strategies of the English-speaking Community of Quebec. For details on the process, go to http://www.qcgn.ca/strategic-priorities-forum/.

Stephen.Thompson@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044 ext. 228

56. Twitter Account (@QCGN)

The QCGN Twitter account provides updates on news about the English-speaking communities of Quebec, and includes links to QCGN press releases, upcoming events in the community and other news. We also use the Twitter account to generate discussion surrounding our events as well as to allow our partners and the public to interact and discuss specific topics. We make sure to reply to all comments and questions as quickly as possible. Follow us!

Samuel.Lavoie@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044 ext. 257

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

57. Information Kit for New Francophone Members and Their Families

An information kit is distributed to new Francophone members and their families who are posted to regions where they must work and live in their second official language. These kits contain documentation on the RCMP Official Languages Program, as well as information on the various services and programs available to them in the local official language minority communities.

Nathalie.Cote@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-6192

58. Official Language Minority Communities Satisfaction Questionnaire

To address possible concerns regarding its services, the RCMP consults with official language minority communities at roundtable discussions, where it hands out the above satisfaction questionnaire to ensure that the discussions met the attendees' needs, including the provision of adequate services in their language of choice.

Nathalie.Cote@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-6192

Société Santé en français (SSF)

59. National Survey on the Health of French Linguistic Minority Communities in Canada

With support from Health Canada and Canadian Heritage, the Société Santé en français undertook a pan-Canadian survey of French linguistic minority communities in order to assess their access to health services and to support the renewal of the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-2018: Education, Immigration, Communities. The report on the findings (Web site not available in English) from the survey was released in June 2014.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

60. Rendez-vous Santé en français 2012

The SSF's 6th Rendez-vous Santé en français (Web site not available in English) brought together over 450 participants from across all ten provinces and three territories to review key challenges for the future of health services in French. Several well-known health personalities were on hand to lead discussions on current and emerging health issues facing French linguistic minority communities across Canada.

Roger.Farley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-954-7467

Statistics Canada

61. 2011 Census and 2011 National Household Survey

Statistics Canada released two important products on official languages and official-language minorities in Canada. Released on March 26, 2014, the Portrait of Official-Language Communities in Canada: 2011 Census and 2011 National Household Survey replaces the product of the same name released in DVD format and based on 2006 Census data. This is a statistical portrait of English and French groups defined by either mother tongue or first official language spoken. For each province and territory and for census divisions and their constituent municipalities, using 2011 Census data and 2011 National Household Survey, users can draw a profile of the official-language communities, by gender, based on selected demographic, cultural, education, labour force and income characteristics.

On April 17, 2014, Statistics Canada released a video entitled Portrait of Official-Language Minorities in Canada. It presents a range of information on a variety of topics and issues of interest to official-language minorities and to anyone interested in the past, present and future of official-language minority populations in Canada. It also provides a glimpse at the current situation of the country's francophone and anglophone minorities. The video summarizes and updates the analyses that Statistics Canada released in the Portraits of Official-Language Minorities in Canada series. These portraits are based on a wide range of statistics drawn from the Censuses of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities.

Jean-Pierre.Corbeil@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-2315

62. Portrait of Official-Language Minorities in Canada

In 2011 and 2012, Statistics Canada published 11 detailed provincial and territorial portraits of official-language minorities in Canada on its website. Each portrait contains a wealth of statistics on various characteristics of these minorities. In addition to demographic data, the portraits provide information on areas considered a priority by official language minority communities, such as health, media, arts and culture, immigration and justice. They also include useful information on employment and income characteristics, subjective vitality and linguistic identity. Much of the data in these portraits were taken from the population censuses and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities, which Statistics Canada conducted after the 2006 census.

Jean-Pierre.Corbeil@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-2315

63. Reference Guide—Data on Official Language Minorities

In May 2013, Statistics Canada published the second edition of Statistics Canada Data Sources on Official-Language Minorities, a detailed reference tool on the various sources of language information available to users of Statistics Canada data.

Jean-Pierre.Corbeil@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-2315

 


Communications with and Services to the Public (Part IV of the OLA)

Air Canada

1. Aerovocab Booklet

This booklet provides airport agents and flight attendants with quick and easy access to words frequently used in the airline industry.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

2. French Support Line

A French support line has been made available to all employees in North America, accessible through the Air Canada Call Centre (1-800 number for support in French). The support line offers an additional option to agents who need help in French to serve Francophone customers and cannot obtain assistance from a bilingual colleague within an acceptable time period.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

3. Hello/Bonjour Banners

Hello/Bonjour banners to promote active offer have been installed in flight attendants' communication centres.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

4. Language Pins

These pins tell customers in which language an airport agent or flight attendant can serve them in.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

5. Language Recognition Award

The Dialogue Award was created to recognize the exceptional conduct of front-line employees who support Air Canada's commitment to serve its customers in both of Canada's official languages. Throughout the year, colleagues and supervisors who wish to submit the name of an employee who has demonstrated conduct that reflects the company's values and commitments can fill out the form in the employee portal or simply send an e-mail to Linguistic Affairs. Customers are also invited to submit the name of a deserving employee through a section of enRoute magazine, which is available on aircraft.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

6. Online Module for Raising Awareness on Language Obligations

This module on Air Canada's language obligations was developed for front-line employees to allow them to see, through the customer experience, how to make an active offer, how to intervene when an employee is not bilingual and how to meet customer expectations.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

7. Video on Active Offer

A Bonjour/Hello video has been developed to explain and promote the active offer.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

8. Bilingual Voice Mail/Electronic Messages

This document provides examples of bilingual voice mail/electronic messages along with an explanation of the Official Languages Act requirements as it relates to active offer.

Ginette.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-6508

9. Official Languages Guidelines—ACOA Obligations for Communications with and Services to the Public

This document provides ACOA employees and employees of organizations acting on behalf of ACOA with information on their roles and responsibilities with respect to providing service to the public in both official languages. It also explains ACOA's official languages obligations for offices that are designated bilingual, for those that are designated unilingual and for websites. This document is available on ACOA's intranet site.

Ginette.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-6508

Atlantic Federal Council (Prince Edward Island)

10. Colloquium on Mutual Respect and Active Offer

At this colloquium, public servants in Prince Edward Island attended sessions on mutual respect and the active offer of service in both official languages. The session objectives were to improve client service and increase active offer compliance, to gain an appreciation of values fundamental to serving official language minority community clients, to review obligations under Part IV of the Official Languages Act, to examine principles of mutual respect and to share best practices in service delivery.

Faith.McIntyre@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-566-8139

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

11. National Recruitment Strategy for Border Services Officer Positions

The CBSA has implemented a new common induction model for all entry-level officer positions: the Officer Induction Training Program (OITP). The OITP is designed to provide greater flexibility to the CBSA to respond to official languages needs at the front-line and to increase bilingual capacity. National recruitment, the first phase of OITP, allows us to tailor recruits to the linguistic needs of the organization. Graduates from the OITP can be deployed to any port of entry nation-wide to increase bilingual capacity.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

12. Official Languages Mouse Pad and Pocket Translator

These two tools were launched in 2009 for the Vancouver Olympic Games. Each tool features key phrases for making a quality active offer that officers can refer to quickly. The pocket translator is laminated so that officers can keep it beside their ID card.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

13. Training Session: A Quality Bilingual Greeting (active offer)

This 20-minute online training session helps CBSA employees gain a better understanding of their obligations under the Official Languages Act. The training covers why an active offer is provided and how to provide this service effectively on the phone and in person. Launched in 2009 for the Vancouver Olympic Games, this training is still being used by officers on a regular basis and is available through the CBSA's intranet site.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development

14. Bilingual Out-of-Office Messages

The purpose of this series of bilingual messages is to help employees draft their own greeting messages. The document is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

15. E-mail Signature Block

This tool helps employees draft their bilingual signature block. The document is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

16. Procedure on the Active Offer of Service in Both Official Languages

This document informs employees of the procedure for making an active offer of service in person, by telephone and in writing. It provides sample voice mail messages and signature blocks for employees who hold bilingual or unilingual positions. It is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

17. Bilingual Cue Card

This cue card features key words and useful phrases in English and French that screening officers can refer to quickly to better serve passengers in their official language of choice. It is designed to be attached to screening officers' security pass clips.

Annie.Proulx@catsa-acsta.gc.ca, 613-949-1558

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

18. Employee's Guide to Delivering Services in Both Official Languages

This guide, which can be found in the Official Languages Resource Centre section of the CFIA's intranet, provides information on the roles and responsibilities of employees who are required to provide service in both official languages, an English-French glossary of terms, common expressions in English and French, and tips and reminders for providing service in both official languages in person and over the phone.

Nicola.Sullivan@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-8357

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

19. Active Offer Checklists for Employees and Managers

These checklists are quick reference guides created for employees and managers to ensure delivery of quality bilingual services to clients.

Martine.Senior@cic.gc.ca, 613-437-8835

20. Managers Self-Assessment Checklist for Communications with and Services to the Public

This simple, comprehensive tool has been developed to assist managers in their continued efforts to ensure that their team delivers effective, responsive services to the clients in their preferred official language.

Martine.Senior@cic.gc.ca, 613-437-8835

Correctional Service Canada

21. Active Offer Video

In order to improve communications and services to the public, a video on active offer, of approximately seven minutes' duration, has been developed to educate employees on the importance of greeting clients in both official languages at all times. The video focuses on active offer as an integral part of service excellence and provides practical tips, as well as concrete examples.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

22. Information Sheet on Practical Expressions for Active Offer

This information sheet contains practical expressions with details on their pronunciation to help employees welcome members of the public in English and French, as well as details on how to effectively provide an active offer in person, on the phone and by means of visual symbols in designated bilingual sites.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

23. Pocket Card for Active Offer

This pocket card contains basic expressions designed for unilingual employees working in reception areas who, in certain exceptional circumstances, must greet a member of the public from an official language minority community before referring the person to a bilingual colleague.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

Department of National Defence

24. Active Offer Tent Card

This tent card, entitled Active Offer of Services in Both Official Languages, defines and describes the concept of an active offer of services and suggests concrete ways of putting it into practice in the workplace. It reminds employees working in designated bilingual offices or regions to clearly show their ability to serve the public in both official languages.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-995-8963

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

25. Active Offer Video: At the Heart of Service Excellence

This 3.5-minute video is the first in a series of videos designed to inform employees of their obligations under the Official Languages Act (OLA). At the Heart of Service Excellence was developed to help employees who serve the public understand how to make an active offer of service in both official languages. It informs front-line employees about their obligations under the OLA with regard to communications with and services to the public, and focuses on active offer as an essential part of service excellence. The video includes clear examples on how to greet clients with an active offer of service in both official languages. At the Heart of Service Excellence has also been integrated into the Department's training sessions and online official languages training modules.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

26. Bilingual Keyboards

Service Canada made the decision to provide bilingual keyboards for citizen-use in all service Canada Centres.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

27. Directive on Official Languages Obligations in Unilingual Service Canada Offices

This directive is designed to provide a consistent national approach to service delivery by Service Canada through its unilingual points of service across the country and to ensure that Service Canada meets its official languages obligations under Part IV of the Official Languages Act and related Government of Canada policies.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario

28. Active Offer Toolkit: Bring it! Speak it! Use it!

The active offer toolkit is one of the many ways in which we are helping to build our bilingual capacity at FedDev Ontario. The toolkit is designed to help employees indicate to members of the public that they are free to choose which official language they wish to be served in and, perhaps more importantly, that the employees feel comfortable using both official languages. The toolkit includes information on the active offer process, including instructions and sample messages, an active offer checklist describing key practices for FedDev Ontario offices, frequently used expressions and frequently asked questions. The toolkit also includes greetings to use with the public, FedDev Ontario's voice mail messages and visual cues (such as signs with written text and the official languages symbol), and useful tips to help guide staff in providing bilingual services. This toolkit was distributed to staff and is also available on FedDev Ontario's intranet.

Paul.Chayer@feddevontario.gc.ca, 613-954-7830

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

29. Active Offer Poster

This poster reminds employees of the importance of greeting clients in both official languages at all times to ensure that Canadians are served in their official language of choice in all regions of the country.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

30. Document: Elements of Service to the Public to be Offered in Both Official Languages

This document provides English-Français and Français-English pictograms and all the elements of service to the public that must be offered in both official languages and delivered in the clients' official language of choice.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

31. Frequently Used Bilingual Phrases

This list of frequently used bilingual phrases can be used in all reception situations, whether on the phone or in person.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

32. "Hello/Bonjour" Service to the Public Toolkit

The "Hello/Bonjour" Service to the Public toolkit was created for employees who deal directly with the public and are therefore the first point of contact for millions of Canadians who use both departments' services. The toolkit contains examples of bilingual telephone and e-mail greetings, a list of common phrases in both official languages, an explanation of what employees can do to ensure that they implement the active offer on a daily basis, and many more tools to help employees better serve Canadians in their official language of choice.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

33. "Hello/Bonjour" Sticker

This sticker can be affixed to a computer screen, a telephone receiver or any other readily accessible area to remind employees that they must greet members of the public in both official languages at all times.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

34. "Hello/Bonjour" Video on the Active Offer of Service to the Public

This video, approximately eight minutes long, provides practical tips and concrete examples to make front-line employees aware of the importance of greeting clients in both official languages at all times, so that Canadians are served in their official language of choice in all regions of the country.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

35. "One Moment Please" Card

This card is intended for employees in unilingual regions who must, under certain exceptional circumstances, greet a member of the public from an official language minority community before referring the person to a bilingual colleague.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

36. Policy on Service to the Public

The Policy on Service to the Public stipulates what must be done and made available in both official languages to ensure that Canadians are served in their official language of choice.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

37. Service to the Public Brochure

The Service to the Public brochure contains information on the Official Languages Act and related policies, as well as recommendations on how to effectively serve the Canadian public in both official languages.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

38. The "Hello/Bonjour" Video's Online Comprehension Test

The online test that accompanies the Service to the Public video is available to both departments' employees on Health Canada's and the Public Health Agency of Canada's intranet site. Managers who supervise employees who serve the public must ensure that their employees take the test in order to verify that they fully understand their responsibilities and are familiar with the basics of excellent service to the public, as explained in the video.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

39. Welcoming Messages (on the Telephone, in Person, by E-mail)

This series of bilingual messages helps employees create their own messages.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

Industry Canada

40. Conference Checklist

Managing a public event of local, national or international scope will bring together English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians. This checklist of suggestions will help ensure that the participants feel welcome and know that services will be available in both official languages before, during and after the event.

Jean-Francois.Gauthier@ic.gc.ca, 613-941-9423

National Capital Commission

41. NCC Website

The NCC has a bilingual website, and all NCC programs and services are offered in English and French, the two official languages of Canada. The site has a section on NCC's objectives concerning the Official Languages Act.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, extension 5277

Natural Resources Canada

42. Video on Active Offer

This video ensures that all employees are aware of their obligations with respect to communications and service delivery. In addition to raising awareness among employees, the video provides instructions on how to clearly make an active offer of service in both official languages.

Marie-Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mfarmach@rncan.gc.ca, 613-996-6728

43. "Would you know what to say?" Posters on Active Offer Over the Phone

These posters direct employees to the video on making an active offer of service in both official languages, as well as to the official languages wiki, which has a host of tools to help revitalize the use of both official languages in the Department. The posters are also used to promote and raise awareness of both official languages.

Marie-Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mfarmach@rncan.gc.ca, 613-996-6728

Parks Canada

44. Commercial Leases Toolkit

Forty-five years ago, the Official Languages Act triggered a series of changes in society that contributed to moulding a modern Canadian identity – one that strives to respect the character and aspirations of both major language communities in Canada. As a federal agency, Parks Canada is committed to a leadership role in striving to foster and enhance bilingual services as set out in the Official Languages Act. In its continuing effort to encourage the use of both official languages in Canada, an official language clause regarding bilingual services has been included in all commercial leases issued since 1973. Parks Canada has developed a toolkit aimed at encouraging its commercial tenants to provide services to the public in both official languages. The kit contains practical tips on providing services in both official languages. The toolkit is randomly supplied to 5 to 10 percent of the Agency's existing commercial tenants on an annual basis. The toolkit is also available upon request.

Judy.Hersey@pc.gc.ca, 819-420-5060

45. Hello! Bonjour! Toolkit

The Hello! Bonjour! toolkit is a suite of national training tools consisting of a DVD, a workbook and an audio CD. The bilingual kit contains useful tools that can be applied by staff so that they may become at ease when greeting and serving Canadians across the country and it helps Parks Canada meet its client service objectives. The toolkit is an integral training component within the Parks Canada Quality Service Standards for Visitors, particularly as it pertains to meeting the Agency's first service standard: "Greet you in both official languages."

Contact: lo-ol@pc.gc.ca

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

46. Welcome Messages (Telephone or E-mail)

Before the summer vacation period, a reminder is sent to all employees in bilingual positions concerning the importance of having bilingual out-of-office messages. A series of bilingual messages is posted on the Public Prosecution Service of Canada website to help employees develop their own phone or e-mail message.

Louise.Levesque@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca, 613-960-8396

Public Service Commission of Canada

47. Active Offer Guide

This guide provides practical tips, key phrases and information on how to use standard greetings and salutations, record voice mail greetings and prepare signature blocks. The guide also contains an active offer checklist.

Lyne.Vaillancourt@cfp-psc.gc.ca, 819-420-6628

Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC)

48. Active Offer of Service in Both Official Languages Handbook

This handbook for PWGSC employees provides information on service delivery in both official languages.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

49. Quick Reference on Active Offer

This checklist ensures that PWGSC employees involved in the active offer of service do not overlook anything.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

50. Useful Expressions for Greeting the Public Handbook

This handbook for PWGSC employees contains a list of useful expressions for providing bilingual service.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

51. Official Languages and Social Media

This document was developed by the RCMP New Media Section to inform regional employees of their official languages obligations when using social media sites to communicate with the public. The document includes a list of designated bilingual offices as well as a chart outlining the type of content that is required to be posted in both official languages.

Cynthia.Misener@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-4551

Service Canada—Atlantic Region

52. Team Leader Engagement on Active Offer Monitoring

Service Canada Centre team leaders across the Atlantic Region play an active role in active offer monitoring in their designated offices and send their monitoring results to the regional Business Expertise Unit for analysis. An active offer monitoring tool has been developed to record observations of the active offer of service and to make suggestions or recommendations for improved service. The observation tool identifies key areas to review when monitoring the active offer of service. The tool can be used to discuss progress, issues and recommendations with managers, supervisors and team leaders and to remind them of the importance of complete adherence to the Official Languages Act. It can also be used as a self-help tool for monitoring the active offer of service.

Doug.Wentzell@servicecanada.gc.ca, 902-426-6923

53. Virtual Agent

The Atlantic Region has launched a new initiative for serving Francophone clients in non-designated bilingual offices. The new service method combines best practices that already exist in each province and a new innovative approach involving the Office Communicator software. By law, employees in offices that are not designated bilingual are not required to serve clients in the language of their choice but are obligated to know how to refer them to the nearest bilingual Service Canada Centre (SCC). Referral to the nearest bilingual SCC is not always an option, given demographics. This initiative was therefore developed to better meet the needs of Francophone clients visiting non-designated bilingual sites. With the Virtual Agent initiative, clients now have two options of service—being served on site virtually by the Office Communicator or being referred to the nearest bilingual SCC.

Alain.Chartrand@servicecanada.gc.ca, 506-851-2585

Statistics Canada

54. Personalized Voice Mail Greetings

This list of bilingual messages with instructions helps employees create a voice mail greeting in both official languages. It includes examples of messages for a regular work day and for short and extended absences.

Anik.Demers@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-640


Complaints

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

1. Official Languages Complaints Process

This document, which is available on ACOA's intranet site, explains when and how an ACOA employee can make an official languages complaint.

Ginette.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-6508

Canada Economic Development

2. Directive on the Management of Official Languages Complaints

This directive indicates the roles and responsibilities associated with and steps for investigating and resolving official languages complaints. The document is available on the Agency's intranet site. The Agency also has an online form where customers can inform us of their dissatisfaction (including the official language in which they have been served).

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)–Quebec

3. Creation of a Follow-Up Grill to Complaints

The CFIA's Quebec Operational Centre's Official Languages Committee has put in place a follow-up monitoring system for all complaints received by way of the electronic address. This allows us to document the follow-up that was done with each file.

Joanne.Riendeau@inspection.gc.ca, 418-648-7373 ext. 263

4. E­-mail Address for Receiving Complaints

The CFIA's Quebec Office Official Languages Committee has created an e-mail address for receiving employees' complaints relating to official languages. These complaints are then discussed with the appropriate authorities to find solutions.

Joanne.Riendeau@inspection.gc.ca, 418-648-7373 ext. 263

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

5. Reference Tool for Processing Official Languages Complaints

This document was developed for use by employees of ESDC (including Service Canada and the Labour Program) who are required to deal with official languages complaints. This reference tool provides them with information on how to deal with complaints and investigations from the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages regarding parts IV, V, VI, and VII and section 91 of the Official Languages Act. This guide contains clear, easy-to-follow instructions, procedures and examples.

NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

6. Guidelines for Official Languages Complaints

These guidelines set out the roles and responsibilities of the parties involved in the official languages complaints process.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

7. Document: Filing a Complaint with the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

This document explains when and how to file a complaint with the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. It is available in HTML and PDF formats, or a booklet can be ordered.

Jean-Philippe.Nadeau@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4706


Language of Work (Part V of the OLA)

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

1. Language of Work at ACOA–Rights and Responsibilities

This document, available on ACOA's intranet site, provides information to ACOA employees on their rights and obligations with respect to language of work. It also explains the responsibility of ACOA offices that are designated unilingual and those that are designated bilingual for language of work purposes.

Ginette.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-6508

2. Tips for Chairing a Bilingual Meeting

This document provide tips for chairing bilingual meetings, held in a designated bilingual region for language of work purposes and at which participants from both linguistic communities are present.

Ginette.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-6508

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

3. Language of Work Information Session for Employees and Managers

This information session on language of work rights and obligations is regularly given to employees and managers to raise their awareness of the subject. The presentation covers such subjects as the challenges faced at the CBSA, supervision, the delivery of personal and central services, and communications. The participants discuss case studies based on actual daily events to debunk myths and are provided with tools to effectively manage challenges related to language of work.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

4. Tools to Support Human Resources Advisors and Managers

The CBSA has developed tools related to official languages to facilitate the work of human resources advisors and to support managers when it comes to human resources processes related to official languages. These tools will allow the CBSA to clarify and standardize processes for staffing bilingual positions and determining the linguistic profiles of positions. The introduction of these tools will allow the CBSA to ensure better monitoring of official languages issues and to better exercise its stewardship.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development

5. Bilingual Meetings Poster

This poster is displayed in every meeting room. It encourages employees to speak in their second official language at meetings.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

6. Pyramid on Holding Bilingual Meetings

This pyramid provides a few tips on how to hold bilingual meetings. These pyramids are placed on the tables in the meeting rooms.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

Canada Post

7. Bookmark

This bookmark provides a list of French characters for employees working with an English keyboard.

France.Coulombe@canadapost.ca, 613-734-6398

Canada Revenue Agency

8. Ambassador Program

Last year, one Branch within the Canada Revenue Agency created an Official Languages Ambassador Program. The official languages ambassadors acted as liaison between their respective divisions and the Official Languages Program team members. They organized fun promotional activities at various times during the year (i.e. Olympics, bilingual meetings, musical Fridays and the Christmas calendar), shared information on official languages with their divisional colleagues, provided updates, created or assisted with various official languages event. Their efforts increased the visibility of official languages within each division and promoted conduciveness within the workplace.

Lise.Boisvert-Godin@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-948-7046

9. Strategy to Enable Employees to Receive Training in French

The Ontario Regional Training and Learning team implemented a strategy to enable employees to receive training in French when there are few requests for French sessions. The regional training and learning group explored options such as actively trying to increase registrations and combining training groups with other regions. As a result the session was run successfully with 19 participants. Training and Learning plans to continue using the substantive equality strategy with other courses for which there are few requests for training in French.

Sandra.Paul1@cra-arc.gc.ca, 416-954-4366 or Marie.Maher@cra-arc.gc.ca, 416-973-6489

10. Survey on the Official Language of the Courses being Offered

A Branch within the Canada Revenue Agency created and conducted a survey to obtain employee feedback on the availability of the courses being offered in the employee's language of choice. The Official Languages Program team wanted to have a better understanding behind the high number of course requests (both technical and non-technical) in both official languages. Recommendations on their findings were brought forth to the Training and Learning team.

Julie.Légaré@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-498-7041

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

11. Tent Card for Boardrooms

A tent card is displayed in every boardroom in the National Capital Region and designated bilingual sites across Canada. It serves as a reminder of how to chair bilingual meetings.

Rachelle.Raymond@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-5294

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC)

12. Discussion Sessions Facilitated by the Official Languages Champion

The Official Languages Champion facilitated discussion sessions with Anglophone (Montreal) and Francophone (NCR) employees on the 2011 Public Service Employee Survey Results for Official Languages to tap into employees' experiences and to seek their recommendations on measures that Citizenship and Immigration Canada could implement to improve these areas. A plan to address shortfalls was developed.

Martine.Senior@cic.gc.ca, 613-437-8835

13. Managers' Self-assessment Checklist on Language of Work

The Managers' Self-assessment Checklist on Language of Work was developed to allow managers and supervisors to carry out a simple self-evaluation to help them understand their role and their language of work responsibilities, and to identify areas for improvement.

Martine.Senior@cic.gc.ca, 613-437-8835

14. Poster "Everyone is free to speak in either English or French"

A poster with the slogan "Everyone is free to speak in either English or French" was designed to encourage employees to express themselves in the language of their choice. Posters are mounted on the walls of conference rooms in regions designated bilingual for language of work.

Martine.Senior@cic.gc.ca, 613-437-8835

15. Self-Assessment Checklist for Planning and Chairing Successful Bilingual Meetings

A Self-Assessment Checklist for Planning and Chairing Successful Bilingual Meetings was designed as a tool to guide meeting facilitators and all levels of management in planning and chairing successful meetings and events involving both English-speaking and French-speaking employees.

Martine.Senior@cic.gc.ca, 613-437-8835

16. The 10 Things You Should Know About Language of Work

This tool provides a useful overview of ways to ensure that CIC employees' language of work rights are respected and obligations met.

Martine.Senior@cic.gc.ca, 613-437-8835

Correctional Services Canada (CSC)

17. Chairing Bilingual Meetings Poster

This poster, designed to be displayed in boardrooms, provides tips on chairing meetings in both official languages.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

18. Right to Communicate in the Language of Choice Poster

This poster aims to foster employees' awareness of their right to communicate in their official language of choice in designated bilingual regions.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

19. Tent Card for Boardrooms

This tent card is displayed in boardrooms at sites designated bilingual for work purposes. It is a reminder of what to take into consideration when setting up meetings at designated bilingual sites.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

20. Tool on Language of Work in Bilingual and Unilingual Regions

As CSC has operational units in several regions of the country, the language of work tool was developed to provide employees and managers with information on their rights and obligations, whether they work in bilingual regions or in unilingual regions.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

21. DARE! OSEZ! Brochure

This brochure provides managers with key messages about official languages and includes a questionnaire that managers can use to begin a dialogue on this topic with their employees. It also comes with a DVD of the DARE! OSEZ! video.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-952-3014

Department of National Defence

22. Holding Bilingual Meetings Poster and Brochure

These two items promote bilingual conversations during meetings. They inform employees of their right to speak in either official language at meetings. They also provide tips on favouring the coexistence of both official languages and advice on how to properly chair bilingual meetings.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-995-8963

23. Toolkit for Bilingual Organizations and Units

A promotional too kit to bring awareness was developed for bilingual organizations and units within the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. This kit contains tools such as a brochure entitled Bilingual Organizations and Units - What you need to know!, a printable promotional poster, a self-assessment tool (published by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages), a tent card and brochure on holding bilingual meetings, two presentations on the rights and responsibilities of civilian employees and military members located in BOUs, and generic articles to be customized in newspapers of bilingual regions.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-995-8963

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

24. Bilingual Bonus Eligibility in Acting Appointment of Less Than Four Months

This reference document describes the eligibility criteria for receiving a bilingualism bonus in an acting appointment of less than four months.

Heather.Quinn@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-5030

25. Managers' Responsibilities for Language of Work in Unilingual Regions, Managers' Responsibilities for Language of Work in Bilingual Regions and Distribution of Documents within Designated Bilingual Regions for Language of Work Purposes

These documents were developed to raise managers' awareness of their obligations pertaining to language of work.

Heather.Quinn@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-5030

26. Official Languages Self-Assessment Guide for Managers—for Bilingual Regions for Language of Work Purposes / for Unilingual Regions for Language of Work Purposes

These two guides were developed to support managers in assessing the performance of their organization or work unit in terms of its official languages responsibilities and, based on the results of this self-assessment, to take the necessary actions to correct or improve the situation.

Heather.Quinn@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-5030

27. Table Card for Bilingual Meetings

This table card encourages meeting attendees to use their official language of choice. Each attendee must feel perfectly free to participate, using his or her choice of either English or French or both at the same meeting.

Heather.Quinn@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-5030

28. Toolkit to Cease Payment of the Bilingualism Bonus

This toolkit was developed to help managers meet their official languages obligations and to manage bilingualism bonus cases in various situations.

Heather.Quinn@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-5030

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

29. Bilingual Meetings Poster

This poster outlines the six key elements of successful and efficient meetings in both official languages.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

30. Chart on Language of Work—Services Offered in Both Official Languages

This chart outlines the services that must be provided to employees in their official language of choice in designated bilingual regions, as well as the services that must be available in both official languages in unilingual regions.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

31. Chart on Official Languages in Communications Between Employees

This chart indicates which official language employees should use with their internal clients if they occupy a bilingual position in a designated bilingual region.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

32. Language of Work—It's your right! It's a question of respect! Brochure

This brochure uses a question and answer format to address various themes, such as supervision, work instruments, personal and central services, meetings and the role of senior management.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

33. Language of Work Poster

This poster has been displayed in all conference rooms in designated bilingual regions, to remind everyone of the importance of creating an environment conducive to the use of both official languages and to encourage employees to express themselves in their official language of choice.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

34. Official Languages in Unilingual Regions Brochure

This brochure describes the official languages rights and responsibilities of managers and employees working in unilingual regions.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

35. Policy on Language of Work

This policy outlines employees' official languages rights and responsibilities and managers' obligations. The policy lists all the work tools that must be available in both official languages in designated bilingual regions to ensure that Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada offer a workplace conducive to the use of both official languages.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

36. Policy on Language of Work Support Document

This support document provides additional information on the Policy on Language of Work, particularly with respect to employees' and managers' rights and obligations. It also facilitates the interpretation and understanding of the various sections of the Treasury Board Secretariat's Policy on Language of Work.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

37. Protocol for Managing Bilingual Meetings Checklist

This protocol consists of a checklist that helps managers hold bilingual meetings.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

Infrastructure Canada (INFC)

38. Effective Bilingual Meetings Poster

INFC created a poster providing tips on how to have effective bilingual meetings with suggestions, such as answering questions in the language of the question, encouraging participants to speak in their language of choice and having a bilingual agenda and reference materials. These posters are found in all boardrooms at INFC .

Kristy.Chapman@infc.gc.ca, 613-960-6389

Justice Canada

39. "Help me to improve my English / Aidez-moi à améliorer mon français" Tags and Signs

These tags and signs promote the use of both official languages at work. They are used to encourage more employees to use both official languages in their workplace.

Stephanie.Levis@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-1884

National Capital Commission

40. Guide for Holding Effective Meetings

These tags and signs promote the use of both official languages at work. They are used to encourage more employees to use both official languages in their workplace.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, extension 5277

Natural Resources Canada

41. "I'm writing in my second language"

Natural Resources Canada's Official Languages Action Group has developed a tool to encourage employees to use their second language in written correspondence. The tool consists in an image of a logo modeled on the official languages logo and a slogan that may be added to the signature block, informing e-mail recipients that the sender is writing in his/her second official language. The purpose of the tool is to encourage employees to use their second official language to write to co-workers and reduce their fear of making mistakes, to encourage recipients to be forgiving of spelling errors and potential shifts in meaning by indicating to them visually that the author is not writing in his or her first official language, to allow employees to write in and practise their second official language on a daily basis, and to show respect for the recipient's first official language.

Marie-Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mfarmach@rncan.gc.ca, 613-996-6728

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

42. An Online Self-Assessment Tool for Managers

As part of a study published in March 2011 entitled "Beyond Bilingual Meetings: Leadership Behaviours for Managers," the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages developed the Leadership Competencies Profile for Official Languages and an online self-assessment tool based on this profile for public service managers. With this tool, managers can evaluate themselves and work to improve their performance and ability to manage bilingual personnel. They can measure their progress, identify their strengths and determine areas for improvement. The tool can give managers a clear picture of their ability to create a workplace conducive to the use of both official languages. It can also be used during performance appraisals.

Diane.Allard@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4690

Privy Council Office

43. Official Languages Awareness Guide for Event Planning

The purpose of this guide is to raise organizing committees' awareness of their language obligations during meetings, including interdepartmental meetings, training sessions, public consultations and special events at the Privy Council Office. It is also intended to remove systemic and psychological barriers that could prevent the use of both official languages during meetings and events.

Serge.Lacroix@pco-bcp.gc.ca, 613-952-4837

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

44. Laminated Poster on Bilingual Meetings

This laminated poster outlines six key elements of successful and efficient meetings in both official languages.

Louise.Levesque@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca, 613-960-8396

45. Language Rights

A capsule was published in the PPSC Communiqué reminding employees who work in a bilingual region and who hold bilingual positions or positions where the use of French or English is needed of their right to receive instructions and be evaluated in the language of their choice. A second capsule reminded the presidents and presidents of meetings in the bilingual region of their obligations with regards bilingual meetings.

Louise.Levesque@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca, 613-960-8396

Public Safety Canada

46. Emergency Management Vocabulary

Public Safety Canada created the "Emergency Management Vocabulary," which features more than 200 terms and definitions frequently used in emergency management (EM). It is meant to facilitate collaboration and standardization of EM terminology across the federal government. The publication demonstrates Public Safety's work to promote a common and consistent approach to EM within the Government of Canada as part of its legislative responsibility under the Emergency Management Act, and offers a tangible example of how Public Safety is working to promote the use of both official languages in the EM field.

Andre.Gilbert@ps-sp.gc.ca, 613-990-2491

Public Works and Government Services Canada

47. Chairing Bilingual Meetings Quick Reference

This leaflet contains a checklist for successful bilingual meetings.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

48. Chairing Bilingual Meetings Tent Card

This bound tent card contains pages describing techniques on how to chair bilingual meetings.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

49. Checklist on Language of Work for Managers in Bilingual Regions

This checklist enables managers to communicate effectively in both official languages, to supervise their employees in the official language of their choice, to provide them with tools in the official language of their choice, and to encourage them to maintain their skills in the other official language.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

50. Communication Between Employees

This diagram printed on cardstock shows how to communicate with other regions.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

51. Poster—Bilingual Meeting

This poster reminds employees that they have the right to use their official language of choice during meetings.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

52. Non-Imperative Staffing: What to Do Before Starting the Process

This tool for managers explains what to do before starting a non-imperative staffing process.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

53. Post-Language Training Tool

This tool for managers helps them support employees returning from language training.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

54. Who Chooses the Language of Supervision? Leaflet

This leaflet explains the role of supervisors in regions designated bilingual.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

55. Bilingual E-mail Templates

Every year, as the vacation season approaches, the RCMP 's Directorate of Diversity and Official Languages provides employees with bilingual "Out of Office" templates. In addition to these templates, examples of common e-mails and of corporate holiday wishes are also available to employees. These message templates were created to enable employees to easily fulfill their official languages obligations in their day-to-day communications.

Nathalie.Cote@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-6192

56. Reference Tools on the Language of Communication in the Workplace

These quick reference tools help employees determine which language to use when communicating with other federal employees. The individual and institutional responsibilities with regard to Part V of the Official Languages Act are illustrated in the following four tools/tables: Communications Between Employees—Individual Responsibilities, Services to Employees—Linguistic Rights of Employees, Communications Between Regions—Institutional Responsibilities and Websites—Institutional Responsibilities.

Nathalie.Cote@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-6192

Shared Services Canada

57. Virtual Management Toolkit

Like a growing number of federal public service organizations, Shared Services Canada (SSC) uses new technologies to overcome distance. SSC's employees are spread out over 380 locations in more than 80 different cities across Canada. Many of them are managed virtually by supervisors who are not located on-site. To fully leverage each employee's talents in virtual management situations, SSC has developed a toolkit, which the Department has posted on its Extranet. An important element of this approach is the handling of language of work rights, which the toolkit explicitly deals with.

Guy.Levert@ssc-spc.gc.ca, 613-240-2068

Statistics Canada

58. Bilingual E-mail Templates

These general-use bilingual e-mail templates for absences, meeting invitations, retirements and so on promote internal bilingual communications.

Anik.Demers@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6405

59. Bilingualism Facilitation Program

This program is available to Statistics Canada divisions, branches and fields interested in improving their official languages situation. A facilitator is assigned to a work environment for a specific period of time. His or her role is to advise and support management and employees in creating and maintaining a bilingual workplace. The facilitator proposes solutions tailored to the work environment. He or she suggests customized tools and mechanisms and works with employees to implement them, thus ensuring that they can be easily maintained in the long term.

Anik.Demers@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6405

60. Bilingual Meeting Workshops

These workshops on holding a bilingual meeting and the associated challenges include a rather original in-house video aimed at engaging the participants. In the discussions that follow, the participants learn best practices and are encouraged to apply them.

Anik.Demers@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6405

61. Policy and Table on Staffing Supervisory Positions

Statistics Canada has adopted a policy on staffing supervisory positions in regions designated bilingual for language of work. All director and higher-level positions as well as assistant director and section chief positions with supervisory duties must be staffed at the CBC level or higher. Unit head, team leader and all other supervisory positions must be staffed at the BBB level or higher. To help managers determine the linguistic profile when creating or reviewing a position, the Official Languages Policy Unit has developed a table that clearly outlines the levels at which supervisory positions must be staffed.

Anik.Demers@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6405

Translation Bureau

62. Templates of Telephone Greetings, Voice Mail Messages and E-mail Messages

The Bureau's Directive on Standardization of Telephone Greetings, Voice Mail Messages and E-mail Messages provides various groups of Bureau employees (language professionals, managers, etc.) with bilingual templates created to enable everyone to easily fulfill their official languages obligations in their day-to-day communications.

Josée Leduc, Bureaudelatraduction.TranslationBureau@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

63. Bilingual Meetings

At TBS, weekly Executive Committee (EXCO) meetings alternate between the two official languages, and sectors are encouraged to follow the example.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

64. Bilingual Out-of-Office Messages

Before the summer and holiday period, a reminder is sent to all employees to remember official languages when preparing their out-of-office email and telephone messages. A series of bilingual messages is posted on the Secretariat's infosite to help employees draft their own out-of-office messages.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

65. CBC Strategy for Senior Level Feeder Groups

The CBC Strategy for Senior Level Feeder Groups (with supervisory functions) was put in place to continue to promote a work environment conducive to the use of both official languages. Its objective is to ensure that employees in subordinate positions can work in the official language of their choice. Employees in senior level feeder groups with no supervision can also take language training to the CBC level in preparation for advancement to the executive levels.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

66. Departmental Survey on Language of Work

The TBS developed and conducted a departmental Survey on Language of Work. The objective of this tool was to measure employee satisfaction in this area. The results of the survey will be used to develop TBS's next departmental three-year Official Languages Action Plan by choosing appropriate activities for improvement where necessary.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Veterans Affairs Canada

67. Holding Successful Bilingual Meetings—Newsletter Article

Effective bilingual meetings provide an excellent opportunity to foster an inclusive environment where everyone feels truly welcome and respected. It is also a great way to promote learning at work.

John.Cathcart@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-370-4766

 


Linguistic Profile of Positions

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

1. Determining Linguistic Requirements Form

Hiring managers complete this form, which is available on ACOA's intranet, to determine the language profile of a position. This document helps managers to reflect on the following key elements: delivery of services to the public, the status of the position, supervision of the position and delivery of internal services to employees in designated bilingual regions for language of work purposes.

Ginette.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-6508

2. Information Document on Linguistic Profiles

This document, available on the Agency's intranet, provides hiring managers with an explanation of the various proficiency levels, the various types of service to the public (spoken, written and visual communication), management positions or functions, supervision requirements, and personal and central services.

Ginette.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-6508

Canada Border Services Agency

3. Guidelines on Staffing Bilingual Positions and Identifying Linguistic Profiles

The CBSA has developed guidelines on staffing bilingual positions and identifying linguistic profiles. These guidelines were approved by the Executive Committee and implemented on April 1, 2014. The objective is to establish sound and consistent practices and procedures within the CBSA and to clarify the roles and responsibilities of human resources advisors, managers and the Official Languages Program.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development

4. Departmental Directive on Designating and Determining the Language Requirements of Positions

This directive explains linguistic profile obligations and the importance of completing the supplementary appendix and the profiler. The document is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

Canadian Heritage

5. The Linguistic Profiler and Manager's Guide

The Linguistic Profiler is an online tool that helps Canadian Heritage managers make decisions to ensure that a position's linguistic profile is accurate. The guide provides managers with important facts that will help determine the language designation of a position.

Classification Administration Officer, 819-953-5085

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

6. Directive on the Linguistic Identification of Positions

This directive aims to ensure that the linguistic designation of positions is established appropriately and aligned with statutory obligations under the Official Languages Act and the Treasury Board Secretariat's policies and directives.

Martine.Senior@cic.gc.ca, 613-437-8835

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

7. Chart: Determining the Linguistic Components of an Organization

This chart was developed to help managers identify the factors they must consider when determining the language requirements of positions, establish the linguistic profile of a bilingual position or determine the minimum number of bilingual positions required in their area of responsibility, and thus confirm their bilingual capacity in terms of services to the public and central services.

Heather.Quinn@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-5030

8. Guidelines on Language Requirements of Positions and Staffing of Bilingual Positions

These guidelines, as well as a presentation and questions and answers, were developed to describe the steps managers must take to ensure that language requirements are established for all positions in the Department and that all positions are staffed in compliance with the Official Languages Act and the Public Service Employment Act.

Heather.Quinn@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-5030

9. Standard Linguistic Profile for Employees Delivering Services to Canadians in bilingual Service Canada Centres

In 2013, Service Canada approved a standard linguistic profile of CBC for employees who deliver services to Canadians in bilingual Service Canada Centres. The standardization of the profile will strengthen the quality of service delivery in the minority language and reinforce consistency across the country. A phased-implementation is being undertaken to ensure sustainability of bilingual service delivery while supporting employees who require additional training to meet the new language profile.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

10. Incumbent's Options Form

This form sets out the incumbent's options following a change to the language requirements and/or linguistic profile of his or her position. It must be signed by the employee and the responsible manager once the employee has chosen an option.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

11. Letter: Change from Bilingual to Unilingual Language Requirements

This letter is used to inform employees that the language requirements of their position have been changed from bilingual to unilingual.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

12. Letter: Change from Unilingual to Bilingual Language Requirements—Employee Does Not Meet Requirements

This letter is used to inform employees that the language requirements of their position have been changed from unilingual to bilingual and that they do not meet the new language requirements.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

13. Letter: Change from Unilingual to Bilingual Language Requirements—Employee Meets Requirements

This letter is used to inform employees that the language requirements of their position have been changed from unilingual to bilingual and that they meet the new language requirements.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

14. Letter: Change Made to the Linguistic Profile—Employee Does Not Meet Requirements

This letter is used to inform employees that the linguistic profile of their position has been changed and that they do not meet the new linguistic profile.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

15. Letter: Change Made to the Linguistic Profile—Employee Meets Requirements

This letter is used to inform employees that the linguistic profile of their position has been changed and that they meet the new linguistic profile.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

16. Linguistic Identification of Positions Module

This module ensures that the language requirements of all positions at Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada are set objectively and fulfill the Department's linguistic obligations to the public and to employees.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

Natural Resources Canada

17. How to Objectively Determine the Language Requirements and Linguistic Profiles of Positions

This tool consists of a detailed questionnaire that helps managers easily and objectively determine the language requirements and linguistic profiles of positions.

Marie-Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mfarmach@rncan.gc.ca, 613-996-6728

Public Works and Government Services Canada

18. Reference Guide and Form: Linguistic Review of a Position

This guide and form are tools that enable managers to assess the language obligations associated with a position. These obligations reflect the duties of the employees or their work units, as well as language obligations with respect to services to the public and language of work.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

19. Guide for the Linguistic Identification of Positions

This guide is an instructional tool that helps managers as well as human resources and official languages specialists accurately identify the linguistic requirements of all positions within each work unit at every hierarchical level in order to ensure adequate bilingual capacity throughout the RCMP .

Nathalie.Cote@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-6192

Shared Services Canada

20. Analysis Grid—Determining Language Requirements of Positions and Staffing of Bilingual Positions

This tool helps managers to objectively determine the language requirements of positions, based on the functions, and ensure that the linguistic obligations with respect to service to the public and language of work, as well as obligations regarding communications with other government departments, are met and reflect the principle of equal status of the two official languages in exercising the functions of the position.

Rania.Ayoub@ssc-spc.gc.ca, 613-769-5029

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

21. Determining the Linguistic Profile of Bilingual Positions: Technical or Specialized Linguistic Profiles

Technical or Specialized Linguistic Profiles is a tool similar to the ABC profiler described below. It was designed for bilingual positions requiring the use of technical or specialized language skills (code P). These skills are normally acquired through specialized training or experience. There are five categories of technical or specialized language skills: dictatyping and dictation, professional writing, editing, translation and interpretation, and teaching and testing. A report may also be saved as a PDF document.

Sharon.Ginsberg@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-957-6238

22. Determining the Linguistic Profile of Bilingual Positions: The ABCs of Linguistic Profiles at Your Fingertips

The ABCs of Linguistic Profiles at Your Fingertips is a tool designed to help managers, as well as human resources and official languages specialists, objectively and consistently identify the linguistic profiles of bilingual positions, while applying the Qualification Standards in Relation to Official Languages. It does not replace the standards, but rather helps users apply them. Users are asked to answer a series of questions on a bilingual position's duties that must be carried out in the second official language. By using the tool, managers establish a linguistic profile in a manner that meets TBS's policy requirements. A printable final report presents the profile and the functions associated with a particular position. This report can also be saved as a PDF document. This tool was updated in June 2011.

Sharon.Ginsberg@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-957-6238

23. Information Sessions for Human Resources Advisors and Assistants (Staffing and Classification)

These information sessions, which are offered to human resources advisors and assistants, cover day-to-day official languages issues. Sessions include information on the process of determining language requirements of positions and the linguistic profile of bilingual positions, and coding to be entered into the human resources system with respect to official languages.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC)

24. Linguistic Review of Positions—A Guide for Working Groups

This guide was developed as part of the implementation of VAC's Official Languages Plan. It provides guidance in identifying the linguistic requirements of positions in order to determine the proper linguistic profile.

John.Cathcart@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-370-4766

 


Official Languages Act - Rights and Obligations

Air Canada

1. Brochure on Air Canada's Language Obligations

This brochure explains the Official Languages Act and how it applies to our daily lives; the active offer of service and the importance of serving customers in the official language of their choice; and the procedure to follow when that is not possible. The brochure is distributed to all new-front line employees during the official languages presentation, and is also available on the intranet site.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

2. Online Orientation Kits

A presentation on Air Canada's official languages obligations is included in the employee orientation kit, which is available online.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

3. Official Languages Policy

This integrated policy establishes respect for the linguistic rights of the public ACOA serves as a core value at the Agency and reaffirms ACOA's duty under the Official Languages Act to serve the public in their official language of choice. The policy also reflects ACOA's approach to official languages whereby the commitment to serve the public in their official language of choice is complemented by an undertaking to consider the needs and realities of the official language minority communities in program development and delivery.

Gerry.Morrissey@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-2415

Canada Economic Development

4. Brochure: Linguistic Rights and Responsibilities

This brochure was initially prepared by PWGSC . Tailored to the Agency, it informs employees and managers of their rights and responsibilities in terms of language of work. The document is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

5. Online Training on Official Languages

This online training was developed to inform employees of their rights and obligations concerning Parts IV,V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)

6. Linguistic Duality at Work for You: Your Guide to Official Languages at CMHC

This guide, available on CMHC's intranet, provides CMHC employees with a reference tool on official languages. The Guide provides an overview of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act, and covers key aspects of the administration of official languages at CMHC, including staffing, language testing and training. It also provides employees with information on their rights and responsibilities and contains a frequently asked questions (FAQs) section.

Lisa Johnson, ljohnson@cmhc-schl.gc.ca, 613-748-4533

Canada Revenue Agency

7. Official Languages and You—Online Course

The Canada Revenue Agency faces a great challenge: training employees who are spread across many programs and offices and ensuring that they receive uniform messages containing all the necessary information. The knowledge required for technical training is also used to develop training for managers and employees in order to make them aware of their rights and obligations in other areas—particularly the official languages—that support employees, management and clients. We wanted to develop an online course for all employees that would allow for self-study without being too heavy. The course is divided into five units, which can be completed separately and applied by managers to meetings as needed.

Lise.Boulay@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-957-7083

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA)

8. Policy on Official Languages

This policy outlines CATSA's obligations under parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act and confirms CATSA's commitment to developing programs and procedures that enhance compliance with its requirements under the Act.

Annie.Proulx@catsa-acsta.gc.ca, 613-949-1558

Canadian Heritage

9. Official Languages Intranet

This intranet site is an important source of information for all employees. It includes a section dedicated to parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act, as well as writing resources and other resources on legislation and regulations.

Nicole.McDougall@pch.gc.ca, 819-934-2502

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

10. Digital Signage

Citizenship and Immigration Canada promoted official languages rights and obligations through TV monitors located in the main lobbies of its National Headquarters' towers.

Martine.Senior@cic.gc.ca, 613-437-8835

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

11. Official Languages Act Video: What does it mean for you?

This three-minute video is the second in a series of videos designed to inform Department employees about their obligations under the Act. What does it mean for you? addresses misconceptions about the Act and encourages the audience to learn more about the Act and what it means for them as federal government employees. This video is available for use by the official languages coordinators in fulfilling their role in raising awareness of official languages.

NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Industry Canada

12. Official Languages Filter

The Official Languages filter questionnaire includes a series of questions to make it easier to assess various components of the Official Languages Act and review the official languages obligations that the Department must meet in preparing Treasury Board submissions.

Roda.Muse@ic.gc.ca, 613-954-2783

13. Official Languages Policy

The purpose of this policy is to foster an enabling culture within the Department with respect to the attainment of official languages objectives by committing to offer services of equal quality to the public regardless of the method of communication. We also commit to taking the necessary steps to respect the principle of linguistic equality within the Department and recognize the needs and specific realities of official language minorities regarding programs and community development.

Cecile.Bourdages@ic.gc.ca, 613-954-3671

Infrastructure Canada

14. Official Languages Obligations

This document outlines the obligations of INFC pursuant to parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act. It is posted in both official languages on the Department's internal site for all employees to assess.

Kristy.Chapman@infc.gc.ca, 613-960-6389

Justice Canada

15. Annotated Federal Language Laws in Canada

This e-book, available on the Justice Canada intranet site, contains all federal legislation relating, in whole or in part, to the use of language within government institutions and in private activities. For each of these laws, the book reproduces the relevant case law excerpts and references. It is regularly updated by the Official Languages Directorate — Official Languages Law group. It is an excellent tool to enable jurists and non-jurists to achieve a better understanding of the legal principles applicable to language issues in Canada.

Renée.Soublière@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-2512

16. Charter Checklist

The Charter Checklist (sections 16 to 23) is prepared by the Official Languages Directorate — Official Languages Law team of the Department of Justice. The checklists, available on the intranet of Justice Canada, are designed to assist legal advisors whose practice may not involve extensive experience with the Charter. The checklists describe the content of each of the provisions, set out its purpose and provide a list of decisions pertaining to those specific provisions. They are regularly updated.

Renée.Soublière@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-2512

17. Language Litigation Summary

The Summary of Language Litigation, available on the intranet of Justice Canada, contains a complete summary of all language rights cases currently before the courts in Canada, whether these cases involve the Attorney Canada or not.  This document allows those interested in language rights to follow the evolution of litigation in this sensitive area and to be informed on a regular basis of the latest case developments. It therefore constitutes a privileged communication, information, surveillance and risk management tool.

Renée.Soublière@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-2512

18. Official Languages Act—A Summary

This document provides a general explanation of the various parts of the Act.

Renée.Soublière@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-2512

19. Official Languages Legal Awareness Program

This detailed PowerPoint presentation provides useful information on the purpose, nature and implementation of constitutional official languages rights and of the Official Languages Act.

Renée.Soublière@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-2512 or Alison.Williams@justice.gc.ca, 613-954-3246

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

20. "Language Rights 2009-2011"

This report summarizes and analyzes court decisions on language rights in 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. While not exhaustive, it is intended as a reference tool for people interested in the judicial interpretation of these rights.

Johane.Tremblay@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4870

21. Overview of the Official Languages Act

This overview of the key sections of the Act includes details on service to the public, language of work and promotion of English and French.

Jean-Philippe.Nadeau@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4706

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

22. Linguistic Obligations When Attending Internal or Public Events

A table outlining employees' linguistic obligations when attending internal or public events was posted on the Public Prosecution Service of Canada intranet site and communication to all employees.

Louise.Levesque@ppsc-sppc-gc.ca, 613-960-8396

23. Overview of the Official Languages Act Paper Cube

This paper cube summarizes parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Act.

Louise.Levesque@ppsc-sppc-gc.ca, 613-960-8396

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

24. Official Languages Kit

As part of its awareness campaign entitled "Our Heritage, Our Advantage," the RCMP 's Official Languages Directorate has developed a kit containing many tools designed to inform employees about their official languages rights and obligations. The kits are distributed through the internal employee orientation program, at presentations and during awareness activities.

Nathalie.Cote@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-6192

25. Official Languages Reference Guide

The Official Languages Reference Guide is a tool developed by the RCMP 's Official Languages Directorate to help employees understand and exercise their official languages rights and obligations under the Official Languages Act, the Regulations, and related policies and directives.

Nathalie.Cote@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-6192

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

26. A Description of Official Languages (Communications with and Services to the Public) Regulations

Written for a broad audience, this document presents the Regulations in some detail, so that readers gain a general understanding of their content. Pursuant to section 32 of the Official Languages Act, the Regulations define what constitutes "significant demand" and "nature of office," as referred to in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Act, and spell out the circumstances under which members of the public can communicate with federal institutions and receive services in the official language of their choice.

Viviane.Beaudoin@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-960-1049

27. BUROLIS

BUROLIS is the Government of Canada's publicly accessible database that identifies federal organizations' official languages obligations under the Official Languages (Communications with and Services to the Public) Regulations. This database lists the offices of the departments and agencies subject to the Regulations as well as those required to provide communications and services in both official languages under the Official Languages Act.

Viviane.Beaudoin@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-960-1049

28. Official Languages Policies Web Page

This web page presents all current TBS official languages policies. It includes a link to other TBS policies related to official languages, such as the Federal Identity Program Policy, and a link to relevant legislation.

Sharon.Ginsberg@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-957-6283

29. President of the Treasury Board's Annual Report on Official Languages

In accordance with Part VIII of the Official Languages Act, the President of the Treasury Board has the mandate to table an annual report to Parliament on the status of official languages programs in the various federal departments and agencies for which he is responsible. This annual report covers the application of parts IV, V and VI of the Act.

Chantal.Terrien@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-946-0519


Other Regional Good Practices

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

1. Official Languages Management Committee

This committee provides overall guidance and leadership in terms of official languages and ensures linkage with the Executive Committee. It also ensures the link between of official languages champions, the Finance and Corporate Services and the Policy and Programs directorates' responsibilities related to official languages. It is chaired by the Agency's official languages champion. A Legal Services representative is invited to attend meetings to provide advice, as needed.

Ginette.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-6508

Atlantic Federal Council (Prince Edward Island)

2. Activity in Charlottetown

Organized by the Atlantic Federal Council (Prince Edward Island), Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) and Carrefour de l'Isle Saint Jean (representative of the Francophone minority community) to celebrate Linguistic Duality Day, this activity included a Jeopardy-style game show consisting of a series of questions on the official languages. It provided a forum for friendly rivalry between senior managers from VAC and other federal institutions in P.E.I.

Faith.McIntyre@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-566-8139

3. Activity in Summerside

Organized by the Atlantic Federal Council (Prince Edward Island) and the Canada Revenue Agency to celebrate Linguistic Duality Day, this activity provided public servants with the opportunity to explore their genealogy and heritage with the help of the Musée Acadien and MacNaught History Centre and Archives. The AutoRoute francophone on GCpedia is an online "highway" designed to enable Francophones, Francophiles and Summerside Tax Centre employees to share information on the official languages and the Francophone minority community.

Faith.McIntyre@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-566-8139

4. Atlantic Federal Council Official Languages Committee (Prince Edward Island)

One of the four priorities of the Atlantic Federal Council (Prince Edward Island) is official languages. A member of the council has been named "champion" in support of this priority. Council members have designated individuals in their organizations to be members of the Atlantic Federal Council Official Languages Committee (P.E.I.). The committee is a collaborative network of federal public servants who have a responsibility under the Official Languages Act. The goal of this committee is to create a culture in which linguistic duality is recognized as an integral, positive part of P.E.I.'s federal public service, which is centered on the core values of respect and inclusion. An action plan for 2012–2015 has been developed, focusing on the following three objectives: develop and maintain bilingual capacity, cultivate a culture of linguistic duality and develop vehicles for linguistic duality within P.E.I., and foster dialogue with Francophone and Acadian communities.

Faith.McIntyre@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-566-8139

5. Bilingual Network on GCconnex

The Official Languages Committee of the Atlantic Federal Council (Prince Edward Island) is pleased to host this GCconnex group, which allows you to network in French and keep abreast of activities and resources offered in French by community organizations or the public service. This group belongs to all of you. Therefore, you are encouraged and invited to add French news, resources and events in your community or at work. Please note that the Atlantic Federal Council (P.E.I.) does not necessarily endorse the information and events posted.

Faith.McIntyre@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-566-8139

6. Children's Contest

Children were encouraged to write an essay, draw a picture or take a photo depicting what Linguistic Duality Day meant to them.

Faith.McIntyre@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-566-8139

7. Crossword Puzzle

A Linguistic Duality Day crossword puzzle was distributed to all P.E.I. federal public servants, who were encouraged to complete it to win prizes.

Faith.McIntyre@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-566-8139

Quebec Federal Council (QFC)

8. Official Languages Committee of the Quebec Federal Council

The Official Languages Committee is responsible for bringing together executives and managers in the Quebec Region to exchange information and best practices, as well as develop and implement actions related to parts IV to VII of the Official Languages Act, in accordance with the priorities of the strategic framework of the Quebec Federal Council.

Michel.SaintDenis@pch.gc.ca, 514-283-5797

9. Official Languages Interdepartmental Network (OLIN)

Working under the aegis of the QFC's Official Languages Committee (QFC-OL), the OLIN is composed of representatives of federal departments in Quebec, who are responsible for parts IV to VII of theAct. The network's mandate is to share and/or develop tools and best practices and discuss challenges related to the Act and to provide recommendations to the QFC-OL. Since 2010, one of the network's central goals has been to broaden and strengthen representation of Part VII and, at the same time, increase the focus on official language minority community development, so as to promote a better understanding of the link between Part VII of the Act and aspects of human resource management in the area of official languages.

Kathleen.Wheeley@hc-sc.gc.ca, 514-283-0949

Service Canada—Atlantic Region

10. Official Languages Integrated Approach

The Atlantic Region has developed an integrated approach to the official languages file. With a new official languages coordination role in place, the Official Languages Committee was revamped and now includes advisors and leads from all business lines. The Committee is developing an official languages plan that will integrate all aspects of official languages (including all parts of the Official Languages Act), as well as other topics, including language training, human resources planning, communications with employees and best practices. The new approach will allow for better accountability, efficiency and reporting and will ensure that everything related to the official languages can be found in one place.

Alain.Chartrand@servicecanada.gc.ca, 506-851-2585


Planning, Promotional and Information Tools

Air Canada

1. Banner Pens

Banner pens with an active offer and contact information reminder are distributed to employees at training, on-boarding sessions and other events.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

2. "Linguistics" Tab on Intranet Site

A "Linguistics" tab is available on the employee intranet home page to offer greater visibility of and better accessibility to anything relating to the language policy as well as linguistic services, such as training, translation and tests. The language policy section includes the presentation given to new employees, the roles and responsibilities of official languages champions, audit reports, and promotional messages, such as the one given on Linguistic Duality Day.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

3. Presentation to New Employees

A presentation to new employees is given during initial training. It explains company obligations, customer expectations of staff, and the tools and services available to help the staff do their jobs.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

4. Publication on Official Languages

This publication includes information on Air Canada's official languages policy and procedures, roles and responsibilities, recruitment, contacts, language level requirements by function, signage, the active offer of service and language training options.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

5. ACOA's Official Languages Action Plan

An integrated action plan (Parts IV, V, VI and VII) has been developed to achieve and further enhance the organization's values, practices and overall culture to reflect the linguistic duality of Canadian society.

Ginette.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-6508 or Nicole.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-874-2279

Canada Border Services Agency

6. Award of Excellence in Official Languages

This award was created to recognize and reward employees for outstanding achievements, attitudes and/or behaviours in the area of official languages. Employees can nominate colleagues who, they feel, have demonstrated leadership, initiative and creativity in promoting both official languages. The selected employee or team receives an award during the President's Awards Ceremony.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development

7. Departmental Official Languages Committee

The Agency's Departmental Official Languages Committee ensures that a coordinated approach is taken to implementing parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act. The Committee is made up of the official languages champion, the official languages program coordinator, the Part VII coordinator, two representatives from the Policy and Communications sector and a legal services representative.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

8. Presentations for New Employees

These presentations are available on the Agency's intranet page for new employees. It gives them an overview of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

9. Three-Year Action Plan

The Canada Economic Development action plan is a living plan designed to improve the Agency's performance in terms of meeting its official languages obligations.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

10. Booth during Les Rendez-vous de la Francophonie

The Agency rented a booth with the Pacific Federal Council during Les Rendez-vous de la Francophonie celebration at Sinclair Centre. The booth was staffed with two bilingual employees who provided pamphlets and information on CRA tax and benefits services in addition to career opportunities at the Agency.

Adrienne.Bozsik@cra-arc.gc.ca, 604-775-5672

Canada School of Public Service, Canadian Heritage and Treasury Board Secretariat

11. OL-Pardy! Quiz

This quiz has questions on parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act. It is in PowerPoint format and is available in three versions: English, French and bilingual.

Mara.Indri-Skinner@pch.gc.ca, 819-994-3577

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

12. Procedure on Official Languages for Employees

This procedure provides the Human Resources Branch with instructions on how to manage official languages in the following areas: identification of language requirements, staffing, post-appointment, second language training, records and reporting.

Annie.Proulx@catsa-acsta.gc.ca, 613-949-1558

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

13. Creation of an Official Languages Awards Category

The CFIA created an Official Languages category for the annual President's National Awards. This award recognizes outstanding contributions in the promotion of both official languages either by an individual CFIA employee or by a group of employees.

Nicola.Sullivan@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-8357

14. Guide to Delivering Services in Both Official Languages

This guide provides managers of bilingual offices with information on how to ensure they have competent and efficient teams providing services to English-speaking and French-speaking clients. The guide includes information on establishing the language profiles of positions, recruiting qualified bilingual employees, language training and setting up a bilingual office, as well as a self-evaluation checklist.

Nicola.Sullivan@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-8357

15. Official Languages Network and Action Plan

The CFIA has an official languages committee, called the Official Languages Network, which drafts an action plan outlining events to promote official languages in a given fiscal year.

Martine.Dubuc@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-5722 or Robert.Charlebois@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815 ext. 4322

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)—Quebec

16. Creation of an Official Languages Committee and Annual Action Plan

The CFIA Quebec Area Office has an official languages committee mandated to implement an annual action plan for service to the public, language of work, equitable representation of language groups and advancement of English and French.

Joanne.Riendeau@inspection.gc.ca, 418-648-7373 ext. 263

17. Official Languages Information Capsules

These information capsules on the Agency's various official languages directives are e-mailed periodically to all employees. They remind employees of their obligations with respect to language of work and bilingual services to the public, they give practical advice on e-mail signature blocks, voice mailbox messages, automated e-mail absence messages, and so on, and provide information on useful websites, such as the Language Portal of Canada, TERMIUM Plus® and the Translation Bureau's site.

Sylvie.Brisebois@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815 ext. 4225

Canadian Heritage

18. 2013-2016 Action Plan of the Official Languages Champion and Co-Champion at Canadian Heritage

This three-year action plan contains the commitments of the official languages champion and co-champion during their mandate.

Karine.Andraos@pch.gc.ca, 819-778-0227

Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS)

19. Agenda

This unique planner, entitled "Official Languages enrich us all / Les langues officielles sont une de nos richesses," can be used at any point during the year. The pages on the right-hand side list the days of the week in a generic fashion (Monday to Friday) without any specific dates, which allows the user to add them if desired. There is sufficient space to enter notes or meetings scheduled for that day, and a tip taken from the Language Portal of Canada appears at the bottom of each page. On the top left side of each page is a word of the week with its definition, followed by information on various official languages topics (e.g. a bit of history on the Service's Official Languages Program; a brief overview of the different parts of the Official Languages Act; information on second language evaluations, maintaining language proficiency and active offer; and samples of bilingual voice mail and e-mail messages). The agenda also contains a one-page calendar for each year (2011–2015) as a reference tool, and sections for "My contacts" and "Notes." The 5½" x 8½" agenda has a total of 108 pages and begins with a table of contents for easy reference.

Leeanne Edgar, LOEOLE@smtp.gc.ca, 613-369-2803

20. Award Focusing on Linguistic Duality

The Diversity and Linguistic Duality award was created to recognize and reward exemplary contributions by employees who visibly and actively promote workforce inclusiveness and respect for the active use of both official languages.

Leeanne Edgar, LOEOLE@smtp.gc.ca, 613-369-2803

21. Official Languages Day

CSIS celebrates its linguistic duality by holding an Official Languages Day every year, and has done so since 2010. A number of activities are organized to celebrate and promote linguistic duality, such as notable guest speakers and fun games (Wheel of Official Languages, Charivari, Jeopardy, dictation by our official languages champion, crosswords, etc.). Employees have an opportunity to meet the official languages team at the kiosks, where they can also obtain information on second language learning and maintenance tools, Second Language Evaluation (SLE) testing, commonly used expressions that cannot be translated word for word, etc. In addition, PWGSC representatives were invited to host a kiosk, which allowed our employees to learn more on the tools available through the Translation Bureau (e.g. TERMIUM Plus®, the Language Portal of Canada website).

Leeanne Edgar, LOEOLE@smtp.gc.ca, 613-369-2803

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

22. Official Languages Steering Committee

Citizenship and Immigration Canada's Official Languages Steering Committee, composed of directors general from various sectors and regions, serves as a forum for senior management discussion and strategic guidance to oversee the development, monitoring and assessment of a horizontal, integrated action plan for implementing policies and programs in order to meet departmental obligations under the Official Languages Act.

Kyle.Cyr@cic.gc.ca, 613-960-1008

23. Two Official Languages Subcommittees for parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act

Two subcommittees have been created to enable directors to share information on the official languages, discuss issues affecting their sectors/regions and provide comments and input for departmental initiatives, guidelines, processes and plans.

Martine.Senior@cic.gc.ca, 613-437-8835

Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

24. Blueprint 2020 and Official Languages

This report entitled "Leveraging Bilingualism in the Public Service of the Future" is the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions' contribution to the Blueprint 2020 exercise. This document outlines our response to the three questions posed in the Blueprint 2020 consultations, specifically what the Blueprint 2020 vision means for official languages in the Public Service; what changes, from the perspective of the use of English and French in the Public Service workplace, would have the greatest impact in making that vision a reality; and, what can the Network of official languages champions do to help achieve the Blueprint 2020 vision. An action plan with regard to the Blueprint 2020 engagement exercise has also been developed and submitted to the Clerk of the Privy Council.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-952-3014

25. DARE! OSEZ Video

This video is intended to promote linguistic duality as an individual and organizational value and to encourage the use of best practices by new recruits and all public service employees. Departments, agencies and Crown corporations are encouraged to use this video in their orientation sessions for new employees. It is available on DVD and online.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-952-3014

26. DARE! OSEZ! Website

This website includes all of the tools developed by the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions to support the official languages champions within their organizations. It outlines the roles and responsibilities of the champions and major official languages stakeholders.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-952-3014

27. Governance Checklist

In response to the inclusion of governance, and the role assigned to champions, in the Policy on Official Languages, which came into force in November 2012, the Council of the Network has developed a governance checklist for deputy heads. This checklist will help them establish an appropriate governance structure within their institutions while taking into consideration their institution's size and mandate.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-952-3014

28. Linguistic Duality Day

The second Thursday of September has been designated Linguistic Duality Day throughout the public service. This annual celebration gives federal employees the opportunity to organize activities promoting official languages within their departments, agencies and Crown corporations.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-952-3014

29. Vision 2017—Strategic Plan on Official Languages

The Council of the Network has developed a strategic plan on official languages—Vision 2017—to support the work of official languages champions in departments, agencies and Crown corporations. This plan is supported by an action plan.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-952-3014

Department of National Defence

30. Let's Talk Newsletter

Let's Talk is an electronic publication that addresses official languages in the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. This newsletter provides news, information, tips, expert advice and lessons learned with regard to official languages and allows employees to voice their opinion on various issues and questions. Thanks to this source of information, employees are kept up-to-date on changing issues related to official languages in the Department, their official languages rights and obligations, official languages governance and the various learning options available to them.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-995-8963

31. Various Promotional Items

An information package containing a wide range of promotional tools for employees and official languages coordinators. This kit includes posters, fact sheets on the language rights of civilian and military personnel, Hello/Bonjour stickers, brochures, notepads, bags, pens and calendars. These tools promote the official languages rights and obligations of civilian employees and military members.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-995-8963

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

32. Dashboard for Official Languages

The ESDC Dashboard for Official Languages is published every three months and provides a useful overview of departmental official languages performance. It is a reference tool that brings together key reporting indicators for all aspects of the Official Languages Program, including those used by the Treasury Board Secretariat and the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages to evaluate departments' official languages performance. These indicators are aligned with the Department's established performance indicators to measure service excellence.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

33. Departmental Procedures on the Application of the Public Service Official Languages Exclusion Approval Order

These procedures, as well as a presentation and questions and answers, were developed to ensure that the conditions prescribed by the Public Service Official Languages Exclusion Approval Order and the Public Service Official Languages Appointment Regulations are properly applied in relation to exclusions granted further to non-imperative staffing.

Heather.Quinn@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-5030

34. Handbook for the Personal and Official Use of the Internet and Intraweb

ESDC uses a number of social media tools to share its content and provide access to reliable, up-to-date information about policies, programs, services and initiatives. The Handbook provides the Department with guidance on managing internal or external social media projects and guides employees' personal use of social media. The section of the Handbook dedicated to official languages describes the requirements related to the use of collaborative tools and helps employees understand their obligations with respect to the Official Languages Act for both internal and external communications.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

35. Key Guiding Principles—Official Languages and Human Resources Planning and Staffing Activities

This document contains tips to help managers ensure that their human resources strategies and action plans take into account official languages considerations, which have a major impact on ESDC's obligations and employees' rights.

Heather.Quinn@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-952-5030

36. National Workshop for the Implementation of the Official Languages Act

The National Official Languages Workshop is an important annual event for the Official Languages Program at ESDC. Held over three days, the workshop brings together more than 50 members of the Department's official languages community. The workshop includes presentations on various aspects of implementing the Act at ESDC and training sessions that are designed to improve the official languages community members' understanding of the Department's official languages initiatives and challenges. Representatives of the Treasury Board Secretariat, the Department of Canadian Heritage, Statistics Canada, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages and a special guest from the PWGSC Translation Bureau attended the last workshop and joined in discussions with the participants. Workshop sessions touched on all parts of the Act. This event provides members of the Department's official languages community with an environment conducive to networking and learning and gives them the opportunity to improve their knowledge of official languages, share best practices, seek advice and receive functional direction.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

37. Official Languages Program Digital Display Animation

This 90-second digital display animation was originally developed for the departmental digital display network to raise employees' awareness of official languages and to invite them to visit the new Official Languages Program intranet site. Adapted versions are regularly used to promote official languages events, including Linguistic Duality Day and Les Rendez-vous de la Francophonie.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

38. Official Languages Program SharePoint Site

Using SharePoint, an online platform for the storage, organization, and sharing of information, this site allows members of the Official Languages Network of Coordinators to access documents related to their roles and responsibilities.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

39. Retractable Banner

This banner was created to promote the Official Languages Program during various events within the Department. It shows the "heart" of ESDC's Official Languages Program and has three slogans that represent the three branches responsible for implementing the Official Languages Act at ESDC.

Official Languages:

At the heart of service excellence

At the heart of our organizational values

At the heart of Canadian society

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Federal Youth Network (FYN)

40. Armchair Discussion: Be an Official Languages Champions

Join Graham Fraser, Daniel Watson, Donna Achimov and Keith Spicer for an interactive discussion about the importance of official languages in the workplace. Learn about Canada's two official languages, best practices and tips for becoming an official languages champion in your organization.

Sarah.Reda@csps-efpc.gc.ca, 613-301-1206

41. Reverse Mentoring Inventory

Are you interested in learning more about Web 2.0 or in practicing your second official language? Would you like to find out the advantages of using social media in government? Do you want to keep pace with the Clerk of the Privy Council's priorities of renewing the workplace and embracing new technologies? FYN has officially launched the Reverse Mentoring Initiative and has developed a national mentoring inventory available to executives, managers and public servants looking to learn more about Web 2.0, social media and other topics of interest, such as the official languages. This year, in partnership with the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions, FYN has extended the mentoring offer to include official languages to allow participants to converse one of more mentors of their choice with a view to maintaining and improving the use of their second official language.

Sarah.Reda@csps-efpc.gc.ca, 613-301-1206

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

42. Information Sheets on Official Languages

These Information Sheets on Human Resources were developed to assist both managers and human resources advisors with basic knowledge on Second Language Evaluation (SLE) Testing, language training for statutory requirements and linguistic identification of positions.

Ghislaine.Laporte@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, 613-990-0080

43. Official Languages Action Plan 2014–2017

This document includes specific actions to improve our performance under each part of the Official Languages Act as well as information on our departmental context, assessments and risks.

Ghislaine.Laporte@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, 613-990-0080

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

44. Did you know…

"Did you know…" is a fun initiative that allows employees to familiarize themselves with various facts about official languages. "Did you know…" messages were posted on the Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada's intranet site every two weeks over a period of four months. These brief messages were designed to give employees tidbits of information on official languages that might inspire them to learn more.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

45. Promotional Official Languages Notepad

This handy notepad promotes the use of both official languages among Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada employees.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

Industry Canada

46. Industry Canada Linguistic Duality Strategy

The objective of the Industry Canada Linguistic Duality Strategy is to promote the full recognition and use of English and French in the Department's areas of expertise. The two main objectives are to better exploit the potential, and reap the benefits, of using English and French all across Canada as a Canadian economic strength; and to give Canadians working in the business sector an opportunity to build relationships and foster greater mutual understanding.

Roda.Muse@ic.gc.ca, 613-954-2783

47. Official Languages Action Plan

Industry Canada's integrated action plan sets objectives in terms of expected results, outlines the accountability framework and lists the measures of success which the Department should achieve between 2013 and 2016. The Action Plan ensures that official languages issues are considered in its approach to improving service to the public, creating an environment conducive to the use of both official languages in the workplace and providing support to official languages minority communities by incorporating these values into the Department's operational practices.

Cecile.Bourdages@ic.gc.ca, 613-954-3671

Infrastructure Canada

48. INFRAmation Articles on the Official Languages

Infrastructure Canada has a weekly newsletter called INFRAmation. The official languages champion regularly posts information, articles or promotional materials on a variety of official languages–related subjects in this newsletter.

Kristy.Chapman@infc.gc.ca, 613-960-6389

Justice Canada

49. Common Strategic Considerations Checklist

The Common Strategic Considerations (CSC) Checklist is a questionnaire to help those responsible for departmental policy development to develop policies and programs. It aims to facilitate the consideration of factors that are important in policy development, common to the preparation of all Memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions and broadly applicable to policy and program development in the federal government. For example, the Department of Justice's CSC Checklist asks if the proposed initiative could have an impact in the area of official languages. Among other things, will it have an impact on the organization's capacity to communicate with and offer services to the public in both official languages, or will it have an impact on the vitality and development of minority English and French communities in Canada? If so, the Department offers possible solutions, such as the possibility of implementing an impact mitigation strategy, that promote analysis and informed decision-making.

Sheena.Pahwa@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-4041

National Capital Commission

50. Award of Excellence in Official Languages

This award was created to recognize and reward employees for outstanding achievements, attitudes and/or behaviours in the area of official languages. Employees can nominate colleagues who, they feel, exemplify excellence in official languages. The employee with the most nominations is presented the Award of Excellence in Official Languages during Les Rendez-vous de la Francophonie.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, extension 5277

51. Official Languages Policy Update

The update is based on the Treasury Board Secretariat's Official Languages Policy and guidelines.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, extension 5277

52. Quiz on French and English Expressions

This fun quiz was created in 2011 for employees to celebrate Linguistic Duality Day. The object of the game is to match as many English expressions to their French equivalents. For example, "To have other fish to fry" = "Avoir d'autres chats à fouetter."

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, extension 5277

53. Telephone Greeting and E-mail Signature Protocol

This document serves as a reference tool for employees' voice messaging and e-mail signature. All new employees receive a copy at their orientation session.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, extension 5277

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

54. 2011–2014 Official Languages Action Plan

This action plan consists in a series of specific initiatives that allow NRCan to meet the requirements and act in the spirit of the Official Languages Act and to comply with the Official Languages Regulations and any related policies. Entitled Beyond Obligations: Revitalizing Official Languages at NRCan, this action plan is the impetus for real change, promoting a culture in which the Department proactively assumes its responsibilities under the Act.

Marie-Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mfarmach@rncan.gc.ca, 613-996-6728

55. Governance Structure for the Management of NRCan's Official Languages Program

One of NRCan's most significant accomplishments with respect to official languages is the implementation of an official languages governance structure based on collective leadership and a comprehensive approach. Collective leadership means that all sectors, managers and employees are mobilized and accountable for their obligations under the Official Languages Act. Although overseen by the Executive Committee, which sets key annual priorities and monitors progress, the governance structure is essentially the responsibility of the Official Languages Action Group. This action group is made up of sectoral and regional champions and coordinates the sectors' and regions' implementation of the action plan. It meets on a monthly basis to discuss official languages issues and provides guidance on initiatives. In conjunction with NRCan's Official Languages Expertise Centre, the action group provides the essential tools and support that the sectors need to implement the action plan. This official languages governance model allows the Department to approach issues related to various parts of the Act in an integrated, horizontal fashion. It also allows information to be centralized for more effective reporting and resource management.

Marie-Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mfarmach@rncan.gc.ca, 613-996-6728

56. Guide for Sector Official Languages Champions

This guide was developed to provide sectoral official languages champions with indispensable tools and methods for implementing the Official Languages Program within the Department. It is an integrated tool that consists of six modules. The guide explains how to set up a sectoral governance mechanism for official languages, raise awareness among managers and employees of official languages issues, provide employees and managers with the tools they need, display bilingualism, measure progress, and monitor official languages initiatives. The guide is simple and adaptable, and includes the methods and tools in a single document.

Marie-Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mfarmach@rncan.gc.ca, 613-996-6728

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

57. Beyond Words Newsletter

Beyond Words is an e-newsletter produced by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, showcasing initiatives, celebrations and the use of both official languages by Canadians. E-mail subscription is available.

Antonia.Papadakou@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4702

58. Celebrating Canada: A Guide to a Successful Bilingual Event

Canada's 150th anniversary, which we will celebrate in 2017, is fast approaching, and regional and national activities will be taking place all across the country. But every event—historical, athletic, cultural or artistic, national or international, large or small—can showcase our two official languages. To help you reach this objective, the Office of the Commissioner of Official languages invites you to read Celebrating Canada: A Guide to a Successful Bilingual Event. The guide presents good practices for planning an event that makes both English- and French-speaking Canadians feel welcome and represented.

Andrew.Gibson@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4683

59. "Discover Our Official Languages" Trivia Game

The rich history and culture of Canada's English- and French-speaking communities is explored in this trivia game. The map of Canada will help players locate these communities, which are found throughout the country.

Jean-Philippe.Nadeau@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4706

60. Organizing a Major Sporting Event in Canada: A Practical Guide to Promoting Official Languages

On March 7, 2011, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages published a practical guide for promoting official languages at major national and international sporting events held in Canada. The guide is based on the Final Report on the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games and provides organizers and federal departments and agencies with information, ideas and advice on how to take both of Canada's official languages into consideration when planning a large-scale sporting event. In addition to providing guidance for sporting event organizers, this guide can be useful for organizers of major cultural and artistic events, which involve many similar challenges.

Andrew.Gibson@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4683

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada

61. Official Language Tip of the Month

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada intranet site has an "Official Language Tip of the Month" which provides support and resources for those looking to improve their second language skills.

Anne.Desjardins@priv.gc.ca, 819-994-5553

Privy Council Office (PCO)

62. Official Languages Place Mat

To enable PCO to provide leadership and effective administration in the management of its official languages program, an Official Languages Place Mat was developed. The Official Languages Place Mat highlights the Official Languages Act requirements and the actions PCO has planned to fulfill these requirements.

Serge.Lacroix@pco-bcp.gc.ca, 613-952-4837

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

63. Leadership Competency Profile for Official Languages and Self-Assessment Tool

The Public Prosecution Service of Canada promoted the Leadership Competency Profile for Official Languages, the Self-Assessment tool and the training provided by the Canada School of Public Service to its managers to help them understand their obligations under the Official Languages Act.

Louise.Levesque@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca, 613-960-8396

64. Legal and Jurilinguistic Resources Portal

A capsule was inserted in the PPSC Communiqué announcing Jurisource.ca, which is a portal of judicial and jurilinguistic resources for professionals in the field of justice, gathering in one place all that is done or written with regards to justice. The gateway is a virtual library, made up of powerful search engines, counting millions of resources at all times on: Law, arrests, studies, reports, lexicon, linguistic capsules, Act models, etc. For the time being, the portal primarily focuses on francophone resources. However, it intends on making available a large number of English resources for professionals working in Anglophone minority communities. This tool is unique in that it was created by the legal community and is directly being fed by the latter. The PPSC was one of the partners involved in developing this tool.

Louise.Levesque@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca, 613-960-8396

65. Quiz

The Public Prosecution Service of Canada has produced a quiz for employees to assess their knowledge of official languages. Available online to all employees, the quiz was launched on Linguistic Duality Day. It covers both PPSC's obligations under the Official Languages Act as well as under Part XVII of the Criminal Code.

Robert.Doyle@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca, 613-952-0267

Public Works and Government Services Canada

66. Dialogue Electronic Bulletin

This information bulletin on everything related to the official languages includes a wealth of practical exercises and articles in both official languages.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

67. Did you know? Electronic Capsule

This electronic capsule provides facts on official languages.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

68. Official Languages Action Plan 2012–2015

This action plan is aligned with the RCMP 's corporate strategy, priorities and core values, and focuses on improving performance towards full compliance with the Official Languages Act, particularly with respect to Part IV—Communications with and Service to the Public, Part V—Language of Work, and Part VII—Advancement of English and French.

Nathalie.Cote@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-6192

69. Posters: Preserving our Official Languages…Our Heritage and Identity

These posters were designed for the "Our Heritage, Our Advantage" awareness campaign in order to inform employees about the importance and value that both official languages have within the RCMP and Canadian society.

Nathalie.Cote@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-6192

70. The Dispatch Newsletter

As part of the celebrations marking the 40th anniversary of the Official Languages Act, the RCMP launched a newsletter entitled The Dispatch. This newsletter is published quarterly and features articles, columns and tools on various aspects of official languages.

Nathalie.Cote@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-6192

Statistics Canada

71. Monthly Column in the Employee Newsletter

Living both official languages! is a monthly column that discusses various aspects of official languages in the workplace, including linguistic rights and responsibilities, tips and tricks on maintaining one's second language and available services.

Anik.Demers@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6405

72. Official Languages Coordinators Network

An official languages coordinator has been appointed to listen to the concerns of his or her co-workers. The coordinator identifies situations that enhance or hinder the use of both official languages at work and provides suggestions on how to improve bilingualism.

Anik.Demers@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6405

73. Official Languages Excellence Award

Since 1999, this award has been given out every year by Statistics Canada's Official Languages Committee to recognize major accomplishments, remarkable initiatives and best practices related to the Agency's Official Languages Program.

Anik.Demers@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6405

74. Subcommittee of Official Languages Coordinators

The Subcommittee of Official Languages Coordinators' responsibilities include but are not limited to: identifying situations that enhance or hinder the use of both official languages at work; providing suggestions on how to improve bilingualism; planning and proposing activities aimed at promoting bilingualism.

Anik.Demers@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6405

Translation Bureau

75. Terminology Standardization Committees and Networks

The Translation Bureau belongs to a number of terminology standardization committees and networks, often created at the request of federal departments to standardize the terminology used by their organization or in a specific field. In some cases, the Bureau coordinates or manages the committee's work, which can result in the production of glossaries or other terminological publications (generally available on the Bureau's website). Field experts, language professionals (including terminologists and linguists) and other players in the field sit on these committees.

Ouafa.Nour-el-Alaoui@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 819-956-0820

76. Tip of the Week and Flash Quiz

The Language Portal of Canada's Tip of the Week and Flash Quiz help federal employees improve their language skills in just two minutes a week. The Tip and the Quiz are informative and easy to find (both are accessible from the home page)!

Josée Leduc, noslangues.ourlanguages@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

Transport Canada—NCR Programs

77. Guide to Official Languages in Transfer Payment Programs

This guide is a comprehensive resource developed to provide program managers and officers responsible for developing and implementing transfer payment programs with the guidance and tools required to ensure compliance with parts IV, V and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Kara.Arsenault@tc.gc.ca, 613-990-2887

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

78. Manager's Guide to Official Languages in Human Resources Management

This user-friendly guide, available on TBS's intranet, provides managers with a summary and overview of official languages as they relate to human resources management. This guide includes information on the language requirements of positions, bilingual capacity of the work unit, changes to the language requirements of a position, creating and staffing a position and second language evaluation.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC)

79. Bilingual Crossword

The answers to this crossword are the same in both official languages.

John.Cathcart@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-370-4766

80. Network of Official Languages Ambassadors

The official languages ambassadors of the Portfolio of Veterans Affairs—composed of Veterans Affairs Canada, the Veterans Review and Appeal Board Canada and the Office of the Veterans Ombudsman—act as advisors to the official languages champions. This network of committed individuals provides a forum for exchanging views on the situation at VAC with regard to official languages and helps address challenges and issues related to the implementation of VAC's Official Languages Program.

John.Cathcart@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-370-4766

81. Official Languages Action Plan of the Portfolio of Veterans Affairs 2012–2015

This document outlines the activities planned for engaging all levels of the portfolio in ensuring compliance with the Official Languages Act, respect for employee rights and the creation of a workplace that is conducive to the use of both official languages. It was developed by the Veterans Affairs Official Languages Advisory Committee.

John.Cathcart@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-370-4766

82. Official Languages Instant Award

VAC has a program that recognizes staff for their contributions and achievements in the area of official languages. Our official languages champions usually present these awards to deserving individuals who demonstrate a commitment to linguistic duality resulting in improved employee morale, better work practices or a spirit of cooperation in the workplace.

John.Cathcart@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-370-4766

Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD)

83. Official Languages Lens for Impacts of Grants and Contribution Projects on Western Francophone Communities

Project officers can actively contribute to the economic advancement of the Francophone community through project review. An Official Languages Lens is part of WD's project due diligence requirements, and it is embedded in the Department's project management system. The Official Languages Lens is a short list of questions that help project officers determine whether a project has the potential for positive impacts on the economic development of Francophone communities. This due diligence tool is part of our review of federal horizontal requirements and considerations.

Contact: OLCoordinator@wd-deo.gc.ca


Roles and Responsibilities

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

1. Official Languages Accountability Framework

This framework explains the roles and responsibilities of all employees, starting with the President of ACOA followed by the Official Languages Champion; the members of the Official Languages Management Committee, the Official Languages Integrated Committee, the Human Resources Directorate, and the Policy and Programs Directorate, managers and employees.

Ginette.LeBlanc@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-6508

Canada Border Service Agency (CBSA)

2. Guide for Employees and Managers on Official Languages

This guide is posted on the CBSA's official languages intranet site and can be downloaded easily. The guides explain the roles and responsibilities of each employee with respect to official languages, including service to the public and language of work. The guides also contain information on linguistic profiles, language training, active offer and communications between the regions.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development

3. Official Languages Accountability Framework

This framework sets out the terms and conditions for implementing the Official Languages Act at the Agency. It provides detailed information on the responsibilities of the various stakeholders in this area.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

Canadian Heritage

4. List of Contact Persons for the Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act in Federal Institutions

This is a list of the contact persons responsible for implementing section 41 of the Act at the national level.

Mara.Indri-Skinner@pch.gc.ca, 613-994-3577

Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

5. Role and Responsibilities of the Official Languages Champion

Since duties and governance models can vary from one organization to another, this generic document was designed for departments and agencies to take from it whatever information addresses their particular circumstances with regard to applying the Official Languages Act. It includes a list of sample activities that reflect the role and responsibilities of an official languages champion.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-952-3014

Department of National Defence

6. Role and Competency Profile of Coordinators of Official Languages

This document outlines the roles, responsibilities and competency profiles of the official languages coordinators at all levels within the Department.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-995-8963

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

7. Online Official Languages Training Modules

Two online training modules were developed. The first module, Exercising my Leadership in Official Languages, provides managers with an overview of the various components of the Official Languages Act. Without this essential knowledge, managers are unable to fulfill their official languages roles and responsibilities. The second module, Official Languages and Me, provides employees with relevant information about their day-to-day work, service excellence and maintaining an environment conducive to the use of both official languages.

NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Farm Credit Canada

8. Toolkit for Managers

This official languages toolkit was prepared for Farm Credit Canada managers. The toolkit outlines the managers' responsibilities with respect to official languages, with a focus on how the use of both official languages helps create extraordinary customer and employee experiences (communications with and services to the public and language of work). Very few references are made to the legal aspects of the Official Languages Act; rather, a values-based approach to official languages has been adopted, and using both official languages is presented as a way of doing business and as a matter of respect.

Robert.Jerrett@fcc-fac.ca, 306-780-7651 or MarieFrance.Magnin@fcc-fac.ca, 306-780-3841

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

9. Official Languages Accountability Framework

This framework outlines how the use of both official languages is implemented in both departments. It provides detailed information regarding stakeholders' responsibilities.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

10. Role and Responsibilities of the Official Languages Coordinators

This document lists the official languages coordinators' responsibilities with regard to parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

Justice Canada

11. Official Languages Governance Chart

This chart presents a diagram of the various stakeholders in the governance of official languages within the federal sphere, as well as their respective roles.

Renée.Soublière@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-2512

Natural Resources Canada

12. Official Languages Guide for Managers and Employees

This guide for managers and employees is a compilation of tools involving service to the public and language of work. It sets out the rights and responsibilities of managers and employees with regard to language.

Marie-Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mfarmach@rncan.gc.ca, 613-996-6728

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

13. Lists of Official Languages Contact Persons

These lists include the name and contact information of the person responsible for official languages in each institution that is subject to the Official Languages Act. It also includes contact information for the official languages champions of each institution and each regional federal council. It is updated with the information submitted to TBS by federal organizations. Those on the list are the best points of contact for any questions regarding official languages in a specific federal organization.

Contact: OLCEInformationCELO@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Veterans Affairs Canada

14. Terms of Reference—Official Languages Advisory Committee

This document describes the committee's mandate, structure and responsibilities.

John.Cathcart@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-370-4766


Second Language Evaluation

Air Canada

1. "Linguistics" Tab on Intranet Site

eLang is an online management application for language testing that employees who have to be tested can use to schedule an appointment or consult their language profile at any time.

Caroline.Demers@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6170

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

2. Preparing for Your Second Official Language Training

This guide, which is found in the Official Languages Resource Centre section of the CFIA's intranet, presents information and ideas from various sources to help employees prepare for a second official language course. It outlines the employees' day-to-day work activities, what is expected of a new student, how to handle work related questions from colleagues and how to stay in touch.

Nicola.Sullivan@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-8357

Infrastructure Canada (INFC)

3. Second Language Evaluation (SLE) Testing Guidelines

INFC has included an appendix to its Language Training Guidelines, which outlines when employees may be SLE tested. It also ensures that employees are not SLE tested unnecessarily to avoid congesting the testing system or risk failing to obtain the levels required for their position.

Kristy.Chapman@infc.gc.ca, 613-960-6389

Public Service Commission of Canada

4. Second Language Writing Skills Self-Assessment

For use in staffing bilingual positions, this self-assessment tool is an optional, unsupervised Internet test designed to provide potential applicants with basic information about their second language writing skills in relation to the second language standards. Applicants may use the test results when considering whether to apply for bilingual positions or to invest their time in applying for other positions. The self-assessment tool is available for all bilingual positions where the hiring manager chooses to add it to the job posting.

Contact: Personnel Psychology Centre, CFP.CPP-PPC.PSC@cfp-psc.gc.ca, 819-420-8671

5. Tripartite Review Board and Detailed Feedback

This Board was formed by the Public Service Commission, in conjunction with the Canada School of Public Service's Language Training Centre, to review cases of employees who have been unable to obtain their target level in oral interaction, even after taking the Second Language Evaluation (SLE) Test of Oral Proficiency (TOP) three or more times. The Board will make advisory recommendations on what can be done to improve a candidate's chances of obtaining the target level. Candidates seeking more information about their strengths and weaknesses during their last TOP can request a detailed feedback session with the Personnel Psychology Centre's TOP Quality Control unit.

Contact: CFP.TCO-CQ-QC-TOP.PSC@cfp-psc.gc.ca, 819-420-8766

6. Video: How Well Do I Speak French?

This video explains to federal public service applicants and federal employees who will be taking the Second Language Evaluation (SLE) Test of Oral Proficiency (TOP) what they can expect before and during their test, as well as some tips for preparing for the TOP.

Selma.Incesulu@cfp-pcs.gc.ca, 819-420-8767

Statistics Canada

7. Strategy on the Validity of Second Language Evaluation Results

To maintain a truly bilingual work environment, Statistics Canada has adopted a strategy requiring employees in a bilingual position to have up-to-date Second Language Evaluation (SLE) results. Directors are responsible for developing an action plan for their division. All employees in a bilingual position whose SLE results are expired are invited to take the SLE again, even if these employees remain in the same position (unless they are exempted from further testing). The action plan can include the following measures: discussion with the employee during the performance review, exercises and SLE preparatory workshops, language training, self-learning with reasonable deadlines (for example, two to three months), SLE tests and creation of a bilingual work environment to provide second-language retention.

Anik.Demers@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6405


Second Language Maintenance

Air Canada

1. Specialized and Customized Online Training

Air Canada has developed a specialized and customized online training course to offer greater flexibility to employees who wish to improve their vocabulary, dialogue and expressions at their own pace.

Danielle.Ferrante@aircanada.ca, 604-270-5557

Atlantic Federal Council (Prince Edward Island)

2. "Allons-y en français!" Challenge

The "Allons-y en français!" challenge, sponsored by the Atlantic Federal Council (P.E.I.), ran during the week of Les Rendez-vous de la Francophonie. The goal of this challenge was for employees to participate in as many French activities as possible to increase their awareness of the French language and culture. The challenge was well received. Approximately 25 people from various P.E.I. federal departments participated. In total, 12,855 minutes (214.25 hours) of French activities were recorded during the challenge period. Each participant received a certificate of participation, and prizes were given to the individual and teams who had racked up the most time during the French activities.

Faith.McIntyre@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-566-8139

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

3. "Help Me Practice My English / Aidez-moi à pratiquer mon français" Poster

Created in 2008, employees who want to become more proficient in their second official language can easily download this poster from the CBSA's intranet and display it in their office. The goal is to encourage their colleagues to speak to them in their second official language.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development (CED)

4. Interdepartmental Twinning Program

This program is made possible through the partnership between CED , the Privy Council Office and Western Economic Diversification. This interdepartmental program allows us to access a pool of Anglophone participants, since there are too few Anglophones at CED to maintain such a program. Twinning is a partnership between two participants (one Anglophone and one Francophone) from different departments who want to speak in both official languages in order to maintain their second language skills. It is recommended that participants speak a minimum of 20 minutes in each official language, at least once a week.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

5. "Today, in English please! / Aujourd'hui en français s.v.p.!" Pins

These pins are distributed to Agency employees who wish to practise using their second official language. We are promoting Second Language Thursdays.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

6. Workshops to Develop Second Language Skills

Canada Economic Development offers employees the opportunity to attend workshops to improve their oral and written language skills two hours a week on shared time.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

7. Assistant Commissioner Coffee Chat

In the CRA's Prairie Region, the Assistant Commissioner (head of the region) invited bilingual employees to a French Coffee Chat providing them with an opportunity to practise their French language skills and get to know each other.

Nicole.McGowan@cra-arc.gc.ca, 204-984-1309

8. French Language Retention Sessions

In the CRA's Prairie Region, bilingual employees and employees working on obtaining their Second Language Evaluation (SLE) levels are encouraged to attend weekly French Language Retention Sessions. During these sessions, employees are encouraged to test their skills by doing quizzes on grammar, punctuation, spelling and vocabulary on the Language Portal of Canada's website, reviewing the CRA lexicon, terminology and acronyms used in the Agency and/or viewing francophone television series.

Nicole.McGowan@cra-arc.gc.ca, 204-984-1309

9. Newspapers in the Minority Official Language

In some of the CRA's Prairie Region offices, French language newspapers have been made available to employees to provide them with another opportunity to improve their French reading skills and to make them aware of official language minority community events.

Nicole.McGowan@cra-arc.gc.ca, 204-984-1309

10. Official Language Info-Capsules

Just one of many initiatives for improving or maintaining employees' second official language in the CRA's Quebec Region, these info-capsules consist in weekly bilingual messages posted on an internal television circuit, informing employees on the usage of English or French expressions, along with their equivalent in the other official language.

Lucie.Veilleux@cra-arc.gc.ca, 514-496-8318

11. Presentations in Second Official Language

Some managers at the CRA encourage and support employees who wish to maintain or enhance their second official language skills by providing them with the opportunity to present various materials at team meetings in their second language. They are also provided with the opportunity to chair meetings in their second official language.

Nathalie.Boivin@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-941-5108

12. Toastmasters—Montreal

The Montreal Tax Services Office started its Toastmasters Club—Aim High at CRA Montreal for the French Language Club and Visez haut à l'ARC Montréal for the English Language Club. Alternating weekly meetings—a meeting in French one week and a meeting in English the next—are held at lunch time. The goal is to have participants develop communication and leadership skills in their official language or their second official language.

Lucie.Veilleux@cra-arc.gc.ca, 514-496-8318

13. Toastmasters—Pacific Region

The CRA's Pacific Region supports a French Toastmaster's Club, including its sessions focused on technical terminology. Members of this Club gave a presentation entitled "A Tale of Two Languages" on Linguistic Duality Day. This presentation consisted of humorous monologues on both official languages, followed by an interactive discussion.

Adrienne.Bozsik@cra-arc.gc.ca, 604-775-5672

Canada School of Public Service

14. Online Products for Official Language Acquisition and Maintenance

The School offers public service employees across Canada blended learning solutions and access to online self-assessment tools in English and French to help them independently improve or maintain their second official language proficiency levels. These online self-assessment tools and products include more than 50  second language tools on MyAccount, the School's learning management system; tools to support acquisition and maintenance of second language skills; self-directed language evaluation simulations and assessment products and tools; and access to interactive tools designed to improve comprehension, pronunciation, grammar and writing skills (reading, writing and oral comprehension).

Annie.Levesque@csps-efpc.gc.ca, 613-853-6674

Canadian Commercial Corporation

15. Pictionary: The Game of Quick Draw

To highlight Linguistic Duality Day annually within the Canadian Commercial Corporation, we play Pictionary: The Game of Quick Draw. This fun initiative gives employees at all levels, including the President, the opportunity to enhance their English- and French-language abilities while sharpening their drawing skills!

Julie Guindon, jguindon@ccc.ca, 613-995-3365

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

16. Maintaining your Second Official Language

This toolkit, which is found in the Official Languages Resource Centre section of the CFIA's intranet, presents information and ideas from various sources to help employees apply and maintain their second official language in their day-to-day activities.

Nicola.Sullivan@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-8357

17. Official Languages Resource Centre

This section of the CFIA's intranet site was developed to help CFIA employees find everything they need to apply their second official language and acquire skills to help learn, maintain and improve their second official language.

Nicola.Sullivan@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-8357

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)—Quebec

18. Didactical Material on Official Languages

The Official Languages Committee of the Quebec Operational Centre of the CFIA has acquired didactical material on official languages that include idiomatic expressions in French along with their English equivalents, grammatical exercises in English, and others.

Sylvie.Brisebois@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815 ext. 4225

19. English Lunch and Learn Events

The purpose of these events is to bring employees together at lunchtime to talk in English and thus maintain and improve their second language. The participants must have Level B or C oral proficiency in English. Employees whose mother tongue is English serve as moderators. Participants at the same language level meet at the same time with a moderator for a free discussion in English about a pre-determined subject. No preparation or exercises are expected of the participants. The participants and moderators receive a certificate at the end of the session.

Sylvie.Brisebois@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815 ext. 4225

20. Fridays in English

The Regional Director encourages employees to communicate in English at work every Friday. This enables employees to break the ice and maintain and improve their English, using vocabulary directly related to their work.

Joanne.Riendeau@inspection.gc.ca, 418-648-7373 ext. 263

21. "Learn in Your Car" CDs

These CDs, called "Learn in Your Car—English 1, 2 and 3," are available to staff. This interactive tool enables employees to maintain and improve their English while in their car. Level 1 focuses on the essential travel vocabulary, while levels 2 and 3 contain more conversational elements and go into grammar and vocabulary in more depth. For each level, there are three audio CDs and a listening guide containing the recorded text and grammar notes (total of three hours of listening time each).

Shirley Salah, Coordonnateur.Formation.Québec@inspection.gc.ca 514-283-3815, extension 4271

22. "Parlons anglais" ("Let's Speak English") DVD and CD

This interactive tool has beginner, intermediate and advanced levels. It enables employees to maintain and improve their English. It is based on a three-pronged instructional approach that allows participants to determine their learning priorities and current level, and work at home or in their car to develop both written and spoken language skills. It also has voice recognition for practising pronunciation; vocabulary and grammar exercises; lessons on travel, business and day-to-day life; cultural videos on a number of cities around the world; and an integrated dictionary. It includes a DVD, a CD, a headset with an integrated microphone, an exercise book and a laptop loaned to the participant by the CFIA's Quebec Office.

Shirley Salah, Coordonnateur.Formation.Quebec@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815 ext. 4271

Canadian Heritage

23. Language Buddy Program

The Language Buddy Program pairs employees who wish to improve their second language skills with volunteers who help them practise.

Nicole.McDougall@pch.gc.ca, 819-934-2502

Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

24. DARE! OSEZ! Poster

This poster was developed to support the work of the official languages champions, who are committed to promoting linguistic duality, but especially to encourage federal employees to communicate in their second language and to invite their colleagues to do the same. The poster is a reminder not to worry about making mistakes. The goal is not for employees to communicate flawlessly, but to challenge themselves, maintain and develop their second language skills, and thus become better communicators.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-952-3014

Farm Credit Canada (FCC)

25. French Lab

This lab, which is held every Friday, is for FCC employees who already have the required level for their position and want to maintain, review or improve their second official language. Employees can come as needed, and teachers provide written activities to assist in the learning.

Robert.Jerrett@fcc-fac.ca, 306-780-7651 or MarieFrance.Magnin@fcc-fac.ca, 306-780-3841

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

26. Tips to maintain your second language

This brochure contains quick and easy tips for maintaining language skills.

Ghislaine.Laporte@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, 613-990-0080

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

27. Language Retention Kits: French as a Second Language and English as a Second Language

These two kits offer a full range of resources and tools that can help employees maintain and improve their second language proficiency. One is for maintaining English as a second language and the other for maintaining French as a second language.

Monique.Gasengayire@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-1584

28. Word of the Week

Word of the Week is a fun initiative for employees to learn new words and broaden their vocabulary, in both official languages. A Word of the Week, including a brief definition and an example of its use, was displayed on the Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada's intranet site every two weeks over a period of four months. This initiative gave the employees the opportunity to broaden their vocabulary in both official languages and to use these words in their daily exchanges with their colleagues.

Ginette.Pelletier@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-6045

Justice Canada

29. Competency Development Tool Kit for Communicating in Your Second Official Language

This toolkit is a guide to various useful resources that directs employees and their managers in their search for learning tools and training for improving or maintaining their competencies in their second official language. The toolkit contains information on training, tools and resources to help employees develop and/or maintain their second official language competencies. It also describes the Public Service Commission's Second Language Evaluation test to help Justice Canada employees prepare for it.

Stephanie.Levis@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-1884

Library and Archives Canada (LAC)

30. Language Training Program

Library and Archives Canada's Language Training Program helps employees improve and maintain their skills in their second official language. Part-time training sessions are offered in the fall and winter. Thanks to technology, employees in the regional offices can participate in these sessions with their colleagues from the National Capital Region, providing an opportunity for interaction among employees from different regions. Although the regular program takes a break during the summer, a wide range of workshops on grammar, writing, reading, oral interaction, and verb tenses remain available. Practice workshops for the second language evaluation tests are also offered during the summer, as well as throughout the rest of the year.

Claire.Lalonde@bac-lac.gc.ca, 613-797-3857

31. Language Twinning Program

In September 2013, LAC added a new component to its language training program. The language twinning program is designed to help LAC employees with a level B, C or E in oral interaction improve and maintain their skills in their second official language. The program is open to all LAC employees, including those in the regional offices.

Claire.Lalonde@bac-lac.gc.ca, 613-797-3857

Natural Resources Canada

32. Agreement on Language Skills Transfer

The employee in language training and his/her manager establish a written agreement that identifies the expectations and obligations of each regarding the use of both official languages as languages of work. The agreement clearly states specific tasks and responsibilities when the employee must use his/her second official language and means taken by the manger to ensure his/her support.

Stephanie.Renaud@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca, 613-947-6277

33. "Do you want to practice with me?" Poster

This poster was designed to promote the use of both official languages in the workplace. It clearly demonstrates that employees who display it in their offices wish to communicate in their second language.

Marie-Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mfarmach@rncan.gc.ca, 613-996-6728

Privy Council Office

34. Language Twinning Program

Launched in 2008, this program was developed to promote second language maintenance among Privy Council employees. It involves a partnership between an Anglophone and a Francophone. They converse and help each other in their respective second official languages. A kit that serves as a participant's guide was created for the program. The participants meet once a week for 45 to 60 minutes.

Serge.Lacroix@pco-bcp.gc.ca, 613-952-4837

Public Safety Canada

35. Frunchs

In the fall of 2011, Public Safety employees in the Department's Nova Scotia Region set up Frunchs, i.e. lunches designed to encourage all employees at all levels to practise their second language in a relaxed atmosphere.

Andre.Gilbert@ps-sp.gc.ca, 613-990-2491

Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC)

36. Tips for Maintaining your Second Official Language

This small card contains tips and tricks to help employees maintain their second official language.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Shared Services Canada (SSC)

37. Linguistic Mentoring—Second Language Acquisition and Retention

The Human Resources and Workplace Directorate of SSC has initiated a Lunch & Learn program coordinated by volunteer mentors who facilitate the oral learning of the second language with a group of up to six learners per group at the B, C or E levels in oral French or English. The sessions are run in an informal way: sessions occur during lunches; each learner talks for a few minutes; the mentor then comments on structure, pronunciation and grammar; questions and discussion are encouraged; mentors switch between groups as the program progresses, allowing for different learner feedback. Each mentor brings his/her original approach to the learning experience (often bringing supplementary materials to the classes). Regional participants join by videoconference for each session. At the end of the ten-week program, mentors and learners are offered a Certificate of Recognition in appreciation for their participation, signed by SSC's official languages champions.

David.Salusbury@ssc-spc.gc.ca, 613-618-2104 and Martin.Parent2@ssc-spc.gc.ca, 613-415-7972

Statistics Canada

38. English and French as a Second Language Educational Toolboxes

Using your second official language at every opportunity will help you communicate with more ease and confidence. To help with this, Statistics Canada has developed an English as a Second Language Toolbox and a French as a Second Language Toolbox. These toolboxes provide learners of all levels with a wide variety of resources, ranging from pronunciation to grammar and verb tenses, vocabulary, expressions, and communications strategies.

Abir.Harb@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-1098

Transport Canada—Atlantic Region

39. "Lingo Wednesdays" / "Mercredi en mots" E-mails

The goal of "Lingo Wednesdays" is to support employees' efforts to maintain and develop their second official language by encouraging them to practise it. In this regard, all Transport Canada Atlantic Region employees receive a weekly e-mail featuring advice, tips and games that enable them to increase or reinforce their linguistic knowledge, thus improving their abilities and self-confidence. Wednesday is the day on which employees are encouraged to speak their second official language with each other in the hallways, while on break and during meetings. Of course, they can always speak their second official language on other days of the week, but they are encouraged to make a special effort on Wednesdays.

Ginette.Roy@tc.gc.ca, 506-851-4614

Veterans Affairs Canada

40. Dare Day… Osez Aujourd'hui Program

This program consists of 52 language activities (linguistic capsules) that allow for the integration of second language usage in the workplace. The program takes an innovative approach to the development of second language skills by having employees dedicate one day a week to using a second language.

John.Cathcart@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-370-4766


Second Language Training

Air Canada

1. "I am learning French" Pins

A pin that reads "I am learning French" is offered to all employees who are learning French. Employees who wear it will try to speak French more often, knowing that customers who see the pin will be more patient and understanding. This initiative was implemented after several employees admitted to not making an active offer or even trying to say a few words in French for fear of not understanding the Francophone customer's reply.

Danielle.Ferrante@aircanada.ca, 604-270-5557

2. Language Training Programs

Air Canada has an internal team of teachers who, over the years, have developed language training programs tailored to employees' needs while incorporating daily work scenarios and vocabulary. The courses offered include accelerated training for beginners, passenger announcement workshops, maintenance courses and a "One moment, please" workshop for beginners. The "One moment, please" workshop teaches basic French vocabulary and expressions used in everyday life and work situations. It aims to enable employees to understand customers' requests and either provide them with the key elements of the answers they need or seek the help of a qualified bilingual colleague. Each participant receives self-teaching materials.

Danielle.Ferrante@aircanada.ca, 604-270-5557

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

3. Official Languages Training Guidelines

These guidelines ensure that ACOA employees have appropriate opportunities to develop and maintain their second official language. It supports decision-making with respect to language training, helps with making official language training available to employees and ensures that language training is administered in a consistent, fair and transparent manner. This document is available on ACOA's intranet site.

Rachel.Haché@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-851-2137

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

4. National Language Training Strategy

The CBSA is implementing a new National Language Training Strategy (LTS), a supporting pillar of the CBSA Official Languages Directives. The LTS is establishing and defining CBSA official languages training programs to ensure that consistent training approaches and delivery strategies are applied across the Agency. It will also define learning programs that will effectively help to increase the bilingual capacity within the CBSA and will guide learners and managers in developing successful individual second language learning strategies. Finally, it will establish results based on tracking and reporting processes that measure return on investment.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

5. Testimonial Videos

In Testimonial videos uploaded to the intranet, employees at the CBSA's language school demonstrate their second language skills and explain why bilingualism is important to them. They share their stories on using their second language, thus strengthening the CBSA's proud commitment to representing Canada's linguistic duality—all the while inspiring their colleagues to learn a second language in a fun and exciting manner. In 2012, this initiative received the CBSA's President's Award in the Official Languages category.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canadian Heritage

6. Corporate Official Languages Strategic Fund

This fund assists branches and regions that lack the funds to support their employees' language training needs.

Dominique.Pilon@pch.gc.ca, 819-994-5521

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

7. Internal Part-Time English Language Training Offered from September to June

For English language training, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission provides pronunciation classes that take into account the challenges of Francophone staff members and of those of Asian origin.

Hakima.Adjali@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca, 613-943-9373

8. Internal Part-Time French Language Training Offered from September to June

For French language training, weekly learning plans, available in electronic format, are used so that staff members who are often called upon to work outside the office can access self-learning from anywhere during their absence.

Hakima.Adjali@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca, 613-943-9373

9. Preparation for Second Language Testing

As part of career development, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission offers certain groups a preparation program for Public Service Commission second language evaluation tests. The preparation program which is designed to help employees maximize their chances of achieving their goals, includes immersion weeks, reading test and writing test preparation group workshops and individual simulations for the oral proficiency test.

Hakima.Adjali@cncs-ccsn.gc.ca, 613-943-9373

10. Training by Videoconference for Our Site and Regional Offices

For French language training, training by videoconference allows employees at site offices and regional offices to receive their training with their colleagues in the National Capital Region. The training combines traditional classroom and videoconference training, and encourages all learners to participate actively. It also helps to strengthen their sense of belonging and promotes discussion between employees regardless of their geographic location.

Hakima.Adjali@cncs-ccsn.gc.ca, 613-943-9373

Canadian Security Intelligence Service

11. Booklets: Websites to Learn French or English

The "Répertoire Web – Amélioration du français" and "The Internet Directory for English Language Improvement" are two booklets published by the Centre collégial de développement de matériel didactique. They contain the best websites for learning or improving one of our official languages (more than 150 sites for English learners and more than 135 sites for French learners). CSIS purchased the booklets and makes them available to all employees.

Leeanne Edgar, LOEOLE@smtp.gc.ca, 613-369-2803

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC)

12. Directive on Second Language Training

This directive is designed to ensure that employees have access to second language training in order to meet and maintain the language requirements of bilingual positions in support of Official Languages Act requirements, as well as Public Service Commission and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat policies. The Department also commits to ensuring that employees have access to second language training in order to fulfill their career aspirations. The key objectives of this directive are to ensure that employees have the necessary linguistic capacity to fulfill their official languages obligations, to maintain a work environment that is conducive to the use of both official languages, to improve second language skills to meet future operational needs and to ensure that all employees have access to second language training.

Martine.Senior@cic.gc.ca, 613-437-8835

13. TUTELA

In fall 2012, CIC launched Tutela.ca, a national resource library and community of practice for English as a Second Language (ESL) and French as a Second Language (FSL) professionals across Canada. A shared federal-provincial initiative funded by CIC, the site provides newcomers with broader access to language teaching resources developed by Canadian professionals, and fosters collaboration within the Canadian Language Benchmark and Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (CLB/NCLC) practitioner communities. Tutela.ca features an extensive library of teaching materials and resources in English and French, as well as social networking features that are used in both official languages (e.g. discussion forums, videoconferencing rooms, events calendars and job listings). With over 4,000 users to date, the site supports vibrant communities of practice and enables ESL/FSL professionals to better meet the official language learning needs of newcomers.

Kyle.Cyr@cic.gc.ca, 613-960-1008

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

14. Developmental Language Training Guidelines

This document helps our managers determine priorities for developmental language training; it is quite useful, given the increasing demand for language training in a resource reduction context.

Ghislaine.Laporte@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, 613-990-0080

Infrastructure Canada

15. Language Training Guidelines

The Department has Language Training Guidelines, which outline the program and include an appendix with Second Language Evaluation (SLE) Testing to ensure that all employees have equal access to second language training and testing opportunities. It also ensures that employees are not SLE tested unnecessarily and do not congest the testing system or risk failing to obtain the levels required for their positions.

Kristy.Chapman@infc.gc.ca, 613-960-6389

16. Second Language Training

The Human Resources Branch has put into place a second language training program for all employees, which includes group and individual language training. This program is funded by Human Resources, and participation is determined by the Department's Language Training Guidelines.

Kristy.Chapman@infc.gc.ca, 613-960-6389

Justice Canada

17. Departmental Language Pairing Program

This program is aimed at giving participants a chance to regularly use their second official language outside the classroom. Participants have commented in their evaluation that this activity greatly boosted their confidence in terms of speaking in their second official language.

Stephanie.Levis@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-1884

18. National Capital Region Non-Statutory Language Training Program

These part-time sessions are designed to help employees improve or maintain their oral and/or written and/or reading comprehension skills at level X, A, B or C. Short-term sessions for oral proficiency are available in the spring, fall and winter, while workshops for grammar and oral proficiency, as well as semi-intensive sessions, are available in the summer.

Stephanie.Levis@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-1884

National Capital Commission (NCC)

19. Second Language Training Program

The NCC offers its employees a training program whose main objective is to allow employees to learn, develop and master the two official languages, English and French.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, extension 5277

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

20. French in Action (Language Training)

Part of the language-training curriculum is based on the learner's work description. Throughout his/her training, the learner develops his/her skills to concretely do his/her work in his/her second official language. Furthermore, the learner builds a "toolbox" which contains, for example, specific work-related vocabulary or communication strategies to help them transfer their language sills to the workplace.

Stephanie.Renaud@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca, 613-947-6277

21. Language Training Centre

The NRCan Language School offers NRCan employees in the National Capital Region the opportunity to improve their second-language skills in order to achieve the B or C language proficiency level. By enabling employees to communicate in both official languages, the Department is investing in linguistic duality and placing value on bilingualism.

Stephanie.Renaud@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca, 613-947-6277

22. Self-Study Centre

NRCan offers employees the opportunity to maintain or improve their knowledge of English or French through the self-study centre. The centre has a host of self-learning tools in both official languages. The centre's documentation has been updated and expanded to include the most recent self-learning language tools available. Employees can borrow books, CD-ROMs, audio material and reference documents for a period of two weeks. In addition, employees can meet with an on-site teacher, who can advise them on their choice of tools.

Stephanie.Renaud@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca, 613-947-6277

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

23. Effective Language Training Practices: Online Tool for Federal Institutions

As part of a study published in September 2013 entitled Challenges: The New Environment for Language Training in the Federal Public Service, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has developed an interactive online language training tool. The tool highlights effective practices grouped into 12 categories, including roles and responsibilities, learning methods and language skills maintenance activities. This online tool has been created for individuals at all levels of the federal government and allows users to create their own personalized list of effective practices, simply by exploring various categories and then clicking and dragging their choices to their own language training model. The final product can be printed.

Diane.Allard@col-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4690

24. Web Map of Second-Language Learning Opportunities at Canada's Universities

This map was developed following a study called "Two Languages, a World of Opportunities: Second language learning in Canada's universities." It lists the second language courses, courses taught in the second language, support programs, networking activities and exchange programs offered at Canadian universities. The map is designed especially for students, teachers and parents. Students who wish to continue learning their second language or to maintain their second-language skills can use it as a guide when deciding which university to attend.

Stephanie.Vanderpool@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4693

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada

25. Formal Process for Providing Access to Language Training

To pursue our commitment to ensure that Canadians are effectively served in both official languages, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada established an Official Languages Committee made up of senior representatives of the Office to ensure that scarce resources for language training are most efficiently allocated across the Office. This approach aims to establish and formalize a process for providing access to language training for those who wish to maintain or improve their language skills in order to meet the language requirements of bilingual positions, as well as those who wish to improve their proficiency in their second official language.

Anne.Desjardins@priv.gc.ca, 819-994-5553

Privy Council Office

26. Meeting Challenges in Your Second Official Language Pamphlet

This pamphlet was designed in May 2011. It is intended primarily for participants in the Twinning Program but may also be useful to anyone who wants to improve his or her language skills and/or prepare for the Second Language Evaluation. The subjects addressed are answering open questions, developing ideas and using complex structures.

Serge.Lacroix@pco-bcp.gc.ca, 613-952-4837

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

27. Accelerated English Language Training Program

The RCMP developed this training program to meet the specific needs of newly engaged unilingual Francophone members. This is a 13-week accelerated learning program, which takes place after the Cadet Training Program at Depot, in Regina. The curriculum for this training has a strong policing orientation, and language proficiency development is supported through practical policing scenario-based learning. This complements the existing English Second Language Training Program, which was developed and implemented in 2008. Both programs were designed to prepare Francophone members to work safely in their second official language.

Nathalie.Cote@rcmp-grc.gc.ca, 613-843-6192

Statistics Canada

28. Internal Language Training Program

The Agency's on-site Language Training Centre provides Statistics Canada employees and, occasionally, employees of other departments with an enriching and rewarding experience through its English as a Second Language and French as a Second Language courses designed to meet statutory requirements and support career development (part-time training, full-time training, Second Language Evaluation preparatory workshops and self-paced learning). The Centre's team of professionals provides customized service to guide employees in all aspects of training: planning, pedagogical advice, progress reports, success strategies, information kit for learners and liaison with managers.

Abir.Harb@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-1098

29. Language Teletraining Program in Regional Offices

This in-house learning solution gives regional Statistics Canada employees access to the same part-time career development language courses as employees in the National Capital Regional (NCR). The courses are given in a virtual classroom setting, with the teacher at Statistics Canada's Language Training Centre in the NCR and the students connected via videoconferencing. Thanks to WebEx, the Public Works and Government Services Canada videoconferencing tool, the teletraining program has proven to be very effective.

Abir.Harb@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-1098

30. Leaflet on the Second-Language Proficiency Levels

Knowing the second-language proficiency levels allows employees to develop them with more ease and confidence. The Language Training and Testing Section has developed a leaflet for each second language proficiency test (reading, written expression and oral proficiency) to help employees become familiar with them. Based on qualification standards defined by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, each leaflet provides a detailed explanation of the general second-language proficiency levels (levels A, B and C) associated with positions that require the use of both English and French.

Abir.Harb@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-1098

Translation Bureau

31. Language Training in Canada

This section of the Language Portal of Canada lists Canadian websites that deal with such language training topics as learning or teaching English as a first or second language, learning or teaching French as a first or second language, and literacy. Users will find lists of online tools and reference works, teaching institutions and organizations working in these fields.

Josée Leduc, noslangues.ourlanguages@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

32. Centralized Language Training Program

This program is based on various methods and on an integrated approach that includes traditional courses such as full-time and part-time group training and summer full-time sessions, in either English or French as a second language at the beginner, intermediate and advanced levels. Part-time sessions during the day and evening are also offered, and courses on English or French grammar are made available. Employees who wish to maintain their skills in their second official language may participate in part-time group sessions of one or two hours weekly. These sessions provide informal opportunities to communicate in one's second language. The Secretariat provides employees with material for self-directed learning and skills retention, such as computer-assisted training modules, practice booklets, preparation booklets for the second language evaluation, grammar books, dictionaries, and reading books.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC)

33. Guidelines for Approving Language Training

This document provides guidelines for the recommendation and/or approval of language training.

John.Cathcart@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-370-4766

34. Second Language Learning Strategy

This strategy provides senior management and middle managers with advice to support the acquisition and the maintenance of second language skills and abilities. It is a means to meet key objectives of the Official Languages Action Plan 2012–2015 and is also closely linked to VAC's National Learning Strategy.

John.Cathcart@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-370-4766

35. Second Language Training Dual Commitment Contract

The first priority of our Second Language Learning Strategy is a commitment to actively support language acquisition and maintenance. In support of this priority, VAC has instituted the Second Language Training Dual Commitment Contract. This contract outlines the respective commitments of the employee and the manager. Once managers review and approve second language training requests, employees submit their completed Second Language Training Application along with the Second Language Training Dual Commitment Contract. This ensures that employees fulfill their commitment to their language acquisition or maintenance training, and that supervisors support and encourage employees so that they successfully complete their training and maintain their second language. The contract fosters a collaborative environment in which the employee can pursue his or her language training with clear expectations and outcomes on the part of the manager and employee.

John.Cathcart@vac-acc.gc.ca, 902-370-4766

Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD)

36. Official Languages Training Policy

WD's Guidelines for Learning and Professional Development include guidance on managing training related to staff that do not have a statutory obligation to take language training under the Public Service Official Languages Appointment Regulations.

Patrick.Faulkner@wd-deo.gc.ca, 780-495-2992


Writing Tools and Tips

Air Canada

1. Linguistic Tips

The Linguistic Tips section of Air Canada's intranet is designed to re-establish good language habits by providing employees with the appropriate terminology to use in both official languages while keeping the workplace in mind. It runs regularly in the Company's daily bulletin and on the employee portal.

Émilie.Haché@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6259

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

2. Correspondence Guide/Guide de correspondance

This guide includes information on general style preferences, usage and protocol a well as sample presidential and ministerial correspondence. This document is useful for employees preparing letters or briefing notes for ACOA in English. This document is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Cynthia.Shannon@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-227-5359 or Caroline.Goguen@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-227-7261

3. Did you know…? / Saviez-vous que…?

These documents are a compilation of articles written by the English or French editor over the years. They include writing grammar and/or language tips to assist ACOA employees in the preparation of clear and concise written materials. They are available on the Agency's intranet site.

Cynthia.Shannon@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-227-5359 or Luc.Belzile@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-452-3185 or Caroline.Goguen@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-227-7261

4. Writing for ACOA

This document, which is available in English only, provides general writing guidelines, grammar, spelling and style used by ACOA. It is useful to both employees and external writers preparing reports and documents for the Agency. The document is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Cynthia.Shannon@acoa-apeca.gc.ca, 506-227-5359

Canada Economic Development (CED)

5. English and French Writing Checklist

This tool provides simple spelling and writing rules (abbreviations, figures and numbers, problem cases, punctuation, etc.). The document is available on the CED 's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@dec-ced.gc.ca, 438-992-7816

Canadian Heritage

6. Canadian Heritage English Writing and Style Guide

This guide has a French equivalent, the Guide de rédaction et de style en français à Patrimoine canadien. The objective of the two documents is to promote the correct use of language and ensure consistent style within the Department.

France.Tremblay-Goban@pch.gc.ca, 819-997-6886 or Marie-Anne.Marin@pch.gc.ca, 819-994-4239

Correctional Services Canada (CSC)

7. Word of the Week

CSC's Word of the Week initiative to help enhance staff's knowledge of correct vocabulary in the second language, particularly terminology in the correctional and public service domain, was launched in 2013. The word bank is fed by CSC staff, and the internal newsletter "This Week at CSC" features a word or expression once a week, along with its pronunciation, synonyms and one or two examples of its use in a sentence. This initiative has recently become a monthly issuance, instead of weekly.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

Statistics Canada

8. Statistics Canada Style Guide

This guide and its French equivalent, the Guide de rédaction de Statistique Canada, were developed to answer common questions about grammar, style and page layout that arise when writing texts. Using real-life examples from the field of statistics, these guides help ensure consistent language use across the Agency.

Sally.Fletcher@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6804 or Julie.Morin@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6456

9. Subcommittee on Terminological and Linguistic Standardization

The mandate of this subcommittee is to standardize the Agency's terminology and usage in both official languages to improve the quality and homogeneity of written communications. It reports to Statistics Canada's Official Languages Committee.

Lila.Turenne@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6172

10. term@stat

This terminology databank contains over 25,000 English and French terms specific to the Agency's activities and is available to all of its employees. This tool helps foster terminological standardization, thus improving written communications at Statistics Canada.

Lila.Turenne@statcan.gc.ca, 613-951-6172

Translation Bureau

11. Language Portal of Canada

This website is a one-stop shop for a large number of Canadian language tools and resources developed not only by the federal government but also by provincial and territorial governments, universities and associations. The Portal gives access to of 2,800 Canadian online language resources, including language articles and quizzes, articles written by our contributors in the language field, and writing tips. And with the search function Gateway to English | Le français sans secrets, the user can search simultaneously in 16 Translation Bureau writing tools, the Bureau's Linguistic Recommendations and Reminders, and the hundreds of language resources on the Portal. Whether it's a question of grammar, style, usage, punctuation or vocabulary, the Language Portal of Canada can help all public servants communicate and write more effectively in both official languages.

Josée Leduc, noslangues.ourlanguages@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

12. Language Quizzes

These language quizzes allow federal employees to put their knowledge of English and French to the test. Some questions are easy, but this can be deceiving, as others require a bit more concentration.

Josée Leduc, noslangues.ourlanguages@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

13. Linguistic Recommendations and Reminders

Consistency is key when communicating with the Canadian public. The Bureau therefore provides linguistic recommendations and reminders on various topics to help standardize vocabulary, spelling and usage in government documents.

Josée Leduc, Bureaudelatraduction.TranslationBureau@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

14. TERMIUM Plus®

Managed by the Bureau, TERMIUM Plus® is the Government of Canada's terminology and linguistic data bank. It contains nearly 4 million terms, most of which are in English and French but approximately 220,000 of which are in Spanish and 18,000 of which are in Portuguese. The Government of Canada's first mobile linguistic application, ourlanguages.gc.ca on the go!, was launched in the fall of 2012. It allows mobile phone users to consult TERMIUM Plus® free of charge on the Internet, using their phone. In addition to providing the latest terminology in nearly all fields, TERMIUM Plus® can find complete expressions and equivalents for acronyms, initialisms or abbreviations in either official language.

Josée Leduc, Bureaudelatraduction.TranslationBureau@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

15. Translation Bureau Publications

Over the years, the Bureau has developed over 600 glossaries and vocabularies containing terms specific to departments' various fields of activity. Some recent glossaries include the Social Media Glossary, the Access to Information Glossary (Fascicle 1), the Remote Predictive Mapping Glossary and the Family Law Glossary. The most recent ones, as well as other publications, can be consulted online or downloaded from the Bureau's website. The same goes for issues of Language Update, the Translation Bureau's journal, which provides solutions to common writing and translation problems, articles on new terms, and language industry news.

Josée Leduc, Bureaudelatraduction.TranslationBureau@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

16. Writing Tools

The Canadian Style, Writing Tips, the Dictionnaire des cooccurrences, ConjugArt and the Guide du rédacteur are just a few of the writing tools provided by the Translation Bureau. Offering solutions to many language problems in English and French, the various tools are grouped together on one page of the Language Portal of Canada. They are arranged so that when you select the type of language problem that interests you (grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, etc.), the tools best able to meet your needs are highlighted.

Josée Leduc, noslangues.ourlanguages@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300


To share your accomplishments and success stories for the 2015 edition of this Collection, please contact:

Diane Lalonde-Spring
National Coordinator
Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions
Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca
613-952-3014