2017 Collection of Official Languages Resources

Author: Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions
Date: 2017
ISSN: 1929-7572 Collection of Official Languages Resources

Table of contents

Message from the Clerk of the Privy Council

Hello! Bonjour!

As we celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation this year, there is no better time to reflect on the rich history of our bilingual country, and our bilingual public service.

Bilingualism is a pillar of our federal public service. Public servants take tremendous pride in their work and in their ability to serve Canadians in both official languages. This is one of our greatest strengths—one which we must continue to foster and develop now and in the years to come.

That is why the Working Group on the Use of Official Languages in the Workplace was established last year to look at ways of improving the use of both official languages in the public service. Consultations with public servants at all levels are underway, and I look forward to receiving the Working Group's final recommendations, which will inform how we coordinate our efforts and resources on official languages going forward, including the Government of Canada's next action plan on official languages.

The 2017 Collection of Official Languages Resources contains more than 500 official languages tools and best practices. It shares valuable ideas on how to promote the use of both official languages in the workplace and how we can build an even more bilingual public service in the future.

I hope you will use these tools and encourage your colleagues to use them as well. Whether the tools are used directly or as models to advance the Official Languages Program in your own organization, there is something useful for everyone in the 2017 Collection.

Together, we are building a strong, bilingual, public service of the future.

Michael Wernick 
Clerk of the Privy Council and Secretary to the Cabinet

Message from the Chair of the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

Hello! Bonjour!

The Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions is extremely proud to share with you the 2017 Collection of Official Languages Resources, a compilation of more than 530 official languages tools, resources and best practices that reflect the collective efforts and experience of the community of official languages champions and practitioners.

Seventeen best practices were selected following the 2015 and 2016 Spotlight on the Top Best Practices on Official Languages contests and presented at the Dragons' Den-style events during the Best Practices Forum on Official Languages held on December 4, 2015, and November 30, 2016. They have been inserted in this revised and expanded Collection. I am pleased that many of you have been inspired to adopt and implement them in your organizations. As per your request, the Council of the Network will continue to gather and share best practices to assist you in promoting work environments that are conducive to the use of both official languages.

The 150th anniversary of Confederation provides us with a historic opportunity to celebrate linguistic duality and to foster recognition of English and French in Canadian society. It is the perfect occasion to encourage a cultural change and to make official languages part of our fabric. This can be done by championing a culture that enables employees to take responsibility for developing and maintaining their proficiency in their second official language and by encouraging them to use the official language of their choice during meetings and when preparing written materials and emails. Another best practice that we strongly support is providing employees in bilingual regions with the necessary information and tools to make an active offer of service in both official languages.

The 2017 Collection of Official Languages Resources clearly demonstrates your leadership and dedication to linguistic duality and we are grateful for your efforts in moving linguistic duality in the Canadian public service beyond being an obligation to becoming a symbol of leadership, respect, understanding and communication with others. The Council of the Network will continue to support you in your work. This year, we will work with Official Languages Champions to update our strategic plan while respecting our vision for a bilingual public service that protects, recognizes and celebrates its diversity through the use and promotion of both English and French.

As leaders, we must continue to build and support the public service of the future, continually pushing the boundaries, and be inspired by the successes we have achieved in official languages. As a network, we will continue to promote success and to work collaboratively with you and our key partners in order to reach our full potential and make sustainable progress.

I would also like to encourage you to continue sharing your accomplishments and success stories with us. Please contact Diane Lalonde-Spring, the National Coordinator of the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions, at diane.lalonde-spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca or 613-668-9617 to provide your input.

Thanks to your leadership and commitment, linguistic duality has clearly become an integral part of Canada's public service. I look forward to actively pursuing our work together!

Debbie Beresford-Green
Chair of the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champion

Advancement of English and French (Part VII of the OLA)

Air Canada

1. Partnerships

Air Canada develops and maintains relationships and partnerships with various organizations connected to the Francophone community across Canada, in order to understand their reality and to better serve these French-speaking communities outside Quebec. We participated in various job fairs, mainly in Calgary, Edmonton, Bathurst, St. John's and Toronto, to increase both our visibility and our number of bilingual candidates, and to better reach and connect with these communities. We created relationships with organizations such as the ACFA, Accès-Emploi and Connexion Carrière in order to be better integrated and represented in Francophone communities outside Quebec. We attended various events promoting official languages, such as the Gala de la Francophonie de Calgary, the Festival du Voyageur held in the Winnipeg community, the Festival franco-ontarien in the National Capital Region, the Vancouver Festival d'été francophone, the Franco-Fête de Toronto and Les Rendez-vous de la Francophonie. The enRoute Film Festival, which offers great visibility for Canadian film students and emerging filmmakers, is promoted via our in-flight entertainment system on board Air Canada flights.

Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

2. RDÉEACOA Committee

This committee is a collaborative body composed of members of the Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité (RDÉE) and ACOA. Each affiliate organization from each of the four Atlantic provinces has a representative on the committee, which serves as a means of gathering feedback from the official language minority communities (OLMCs) on how the government is responding to their needs in the area of economic development. The committee meets twice a year, on average, and maintains a constant dialogue with the OLMCs. The creation of the committee is a best practice that yields positive results, as it provides a forum for exchanging information on the development of an economic strategy with the OLMCs in Atlantic Canada.

Gerry.Morrissey@canada.ca, 506-378-1179

3. Regional Coordinators Committee—Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act

This committee is responsible for ACOA's implementation of Part VII of the Act. Each regional office is represented on the committee by coordinators responsible for issues related to Part VII of the Act. The committee serves many purposes, including evaluating project proposals from the community under the Economic Development Initiative, considering policy and program issues at ACOA from an official-languages perspective and maintaining a dialogue with official language minority communities.

Nicole.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-380-5043

4. Regional Coordinator's Toolbox—Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act

The Agency developed a toolbox within an internal SharePoint workspace for the Regional Coordinators Committee to serve as an orientation tool for account managers in their role as regional coordinators in the implementation of Part VII of the Act. The toolbox includes reference documents and tools provided by Canadian Heritage and other departments as well as some created by ACOA. The SharePoint also includes the Agency's Official Languages Policy, the coordinators' role (particularly their role on the RDÉEACOA Committee), the workings of the various committees, the Agency's action plan and report on achievements, and other relevant information.

Nicole.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-380-5043

British Columbia Federal Council

5. Annual Consultation with Official Language Minority Communities

The British Columbia Federal Council organizes an annual consultation with the official language minority communities of the Pacific on the second Friday in November. The event precedes the annual general assembly of the Federation of Francophones of British Columbia and enables a dialogue between the official language minority communities and the Official Languages Committee of the British Columbia Federal Council.

Marc.Grignon@tc.gc.ca, 604-666-0012

6. Celebration of the Francophonie in Vancouver

As part of Les Rendez-vous de la Francophonie, the British Columbia Federal Council, in partnership with the Francophone community of British Columbia, participates in the organization of the "Celebration of Francophonie in Vancouver." This event takes place on March 20, the official Day of the Francophonie in British Columbia, as well as the official Journée internationale de la Francophonie. The event includes a trade show with information kiosks for the public and for federal employees, the presentation of the Official Languages Award of Excellence from the British Columbia Federal Council and the Cornouiller d'or award from the Fédération des Francophones de la Colombie-Britannique, as well as various activities highlighting the artistic creativity of the Francophone community of British Columbia. The celebration brings together various partners in about 40 kiosks, including federal departments and agencies, as well as provincial agencies, Francophone organizations and community groups from British Columbia.

Marc.Grignon@tc.gc.ca, 604-666-0012

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

7. Partnership with Collège Boréal

In 2011, a partnership between the CBSA and Collège Boréal was established to train border services officers from the CBSA's Southern Ontario Region in their second language. This partnership is a success, as it allows officers to receive language training and thus improve their second language skills. Thanks to this partnership, the CBSA has established a close relationship with representatives of the French community in southern Ontario, raised awareness of the hiring process and determined what changes should be made to better reflect their reality.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

8. Presentation on Part VII of the Official Languages Act and Official Language Minority Communities

A presentation called "Focus on Linguistic Communities" was uploaded to the CBSA's intranet and sent to the Agency's regional offices to assist them in their implementation of Part VII of the Act. This tool provides an overview of the official language minority communities (OLMCs) across Canada and outlines several regional CBSA initiatives that support the vitality of OLMCs. It also includes tips and a wealth of resources promoting the implementation of best practices.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development Agency for the Quebec Regions (CED)

9. Business Offices' Official Languages Liaison Officers

CED has a network of official languages liaison officers in their business offices. They are the intermediaries between official languages coordinators and employees in the regions.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

10. Sharing External Postings with QCGN

All CED positions displayed externally are sent to the Quebec Community Groups Networks (QCGN). QCGN promotes them to its community.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

11. Manager's Guide for Implementing Part VII of the Official Languages Act

This tool provides program managers with information on their responsibilities under Part VII of the Act, how to meet these responsibilities and the impact of Part VII on their external programs.

Sari.Abdallah@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-853-0611

12. Official Language Minority Communities Interview Questionnaire

This document, entitled "Official Language Minority Communities Interview Questionnaire," is used by the CRA regional representatives to guide their discussions with representatives of the Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs), so that they can identify the communities' needs within the CRA's mandate. This tool adopted a more coordinated targeted approach with functional authorities at the CRA for the timely distribution of information relevant to OLMCs. It also broadened the scope of the Agency's Outreach Plan to raise awareness of CRA initiatives with the OLMCs.

Sari.Abdallah@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-853-0611

13. Partnerships with English Educational Institutions

To increase the representation of Anglophones in the CRA's Quebec Region workforce, the Quebec Regional Call Centre has partnered with Concordia University and the Dawson Cégep, both English-speaking institutions, on a co-op program aimed at recruiting Anglophone students. The program gives students an opportunity to acquire practical and relevant work experience while fulfilling their study program requirements. It also allows the CRA to contribute to the development of English-speaking communities in Quebec by playing the role of responsible corporate employer in these communities. In 2009, this initiative received Concordia University's Outstanding Commitment to CO-OP Award.

Sari.Abdallah@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-853-0611

14. Part VII Checklist for Reviewing Operations

This tool helps managers review the impact of their programs on official language minority communities and assesses the full recognition of the use of English and French in their programs.

Sari.Abdallah@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-853-0611

Canada School of Public Service

15. Guide for New Regional Official Languages Coordinators

The School has developed an internal guide for new regional official languages coordinators that covers the accountability framework for official languages as well as the roles and responsibilities of official languages coordinators.

Robert.Beaumier@canada.ca, 613-853-6369

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

16. Creation of a Generic Presentation on the Agency's Responsibilities towards Official Languages

The CFIA developed a generic presentation that also includes its responsibilities towards official languages. This presentation is used for the promotion of the Agency by official language minority communities. The presentation will be given by champions to the communities to explore which actions could be put in place to better serve them with respect to the CFIA mandate.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

17. Structured Approach with Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs)

To ensure that its services to the public are tailored to the needs of second-language minority communities in the country, the CFIA initiated a structured approach with members of its Network. It aims to meet the short-term and long-term needs of associations representing OLMCs by discussing our respective missions and exploring avenues of cooperation. In order to do this, the CFIA has developed a digital presentation that summarizes its mission and its activities as well as its official language–related objectives and activities. The CFIA also plans to conduct information workshops with its management teams to inform them about their roles and responsibilities regarding official languages, and particularly OLMCs, in order to develop a systematic official languages "window" for any activities, program development and other actions.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

Canadian Heritage

18. Interdepartmental Networks of Official Languages Coordinators Contributing to the Implementation of Section 41 (Part VII) of the Official Languages Act in the Regions

British Columbia

Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages Coordinators—British Columbia (INOLC–BC)

Isabelle.Major@canada.ca, 604-417-1490

Alberta

Interdepartmental Official Languages Network of Alberta
This network focuses on the implementation of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Sophie.Gauthier@canada.ca, 780-495-8383

Saskatchewan

Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages Coordinators—Saskatchewan (INOLC–S)
This network focuses on the implementation of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Erica.Potie@canada.ca, 306-261-4128

Manitoba

Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages—Manitoba (INOL–M)
This network focuses on the implementation of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Diane.Dorge@canada.ca, 204-984-4875

Ontario

Ontario Official Languages Interdepartmental Network (OOLIN)
This network focuses on the implementation of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Michael.Morin@canada.ca, 613-299-1646

Quebec

Working Group on Arts, Culture and Heritage with the English-Speaking Communities of Quebec

Jacqueline.Ritchi@canada.ca, 514-283-5895

Atlantic section 41 Network

This network of regional coordinators is responsible for the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act in the Atlantic provinces.

New-Brunswick
Julie.Levesque2@canada.ca, 506-851-3319

Prince Edward Island
Marie-Claire.Caouette@canada.ca, 506-962-5134

Nova Scotia
Martin.Paquet@canada.ca, 902-426-8394

Newfoundland and Labrador
Manon.Avoine@canada.ca, 709-725-0035

19. Support for the Implementation of Part VII of the Official Languages Act

Canadian Heritage helps federal departments and agencies fully contribute to the implementation of Part VII of the Act. The Department coordinates the national network of contact persons for the implementation of section 41 of the Act in federal organizations, facilitates relations between communities and federal organizations and produces a range of information tools, including the following:

  • One-pager "A glance at section 41 of the Official Languages Act"
  • Guide on Part VII—Implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act
  • Capitalizing on its full potential—Implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act
  • Good practices—Implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act
  • Good practices—Fostering the recognition and use of both English and French in Canadian society
  • Tool for reflection on optimizing the contribution of a federal organization, on the basis of its mandate
  • Official Languages Annual Report—Achievements of Designated Federal Institutions—Implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act
  • One-pager "The Canadian Francophonie"
  • An official languages short film (Part VII Clip).

Many of the tools for the implementation of section 41 of the Act can be found on GCpedia.

Sarah.Boily@canada.ca, 819-934-9195

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)

20. CRTCOLMCs Discussion Group

The CRTC established a CRTCOLMCs discussion group as part of its implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act. The group is made up of spokespersons for official language minority community organizations and CRTC stakeholders (senior managers, sectoral coordinators and OLA section 41 implementation officers). The group meets twice a year to find ways to maximize OLMCs' participation in the CRTC's public proceedings to ensure that their realities are taken into account in deliberations leading to CRTC decisions.

Frédéric.Janelle@crtc.gc.ca, 819-997-4608

21. Lens 41

The CRTC has developed a tool, Lens 41, which is incorporated into its decision-making process in order to include the objectives set out in section 41 of the Official Languages Act. All information documents regarding the CRTC's public proceedings include a section where staff can, if appropriate, indicate issues concerning official languages and Official Language Minority Communities in order to ensure that their vitality and development are enhanced.

Frédéric.Janelle@crtc.gc.ca, 819-997-4608

Community Health and Social Services Network (CHSSN)

22. Community Development in English-Speaking Communities in Québec: Lessons Learned from a Participatory Action Research Project

This community development project was carried out from 2009 to 2013 at the Institut national de santé publique in collaboration with the CHSSN. The project objectives were three-fold: to increase knowledge on English-speaking communities in Québec; to develop tools for mobilizing these communities; to support English-speaking communities in implementing a community development approach. The project summary report discusses the conceptual framework for the project as well as the methodology used, followed by portraits of six communities that were studied, reflections on community portraits as a participatory action research method and some lessons learned regarding community development among English-speaking communities in Québec.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

23. Community Health Education Program and Tools

The Community Health Education Program has made it possible to improve access to a range of English-language health and social information in one's community via a variety of mediums: videoconferencing; telephone conferencing; DVD's; community radio (Internet access); and follow-up activities. Many of the community health education tools are available for reference directly from the CHSSN website.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

24. Community Health Promotion Projects

The Community Health Promotion Projects Program aims to improve access to activities and programs promoting health and disease prevention by reinforcing the community sector working with the health and social services centres and public health programs. The program addresses the needs of vulnerable English-speaking groups through activities and programs that promote health and disease prevention; and information in the areas of public health or related programs, such as seniors and persons with loss of autonomy, youth and families, mental health and drug and alcohol addiction. For more information, visit the CHSSN website.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

25. Community Mobilization Model for Improving the Health and Vitality of English-speaking Communities in Quebec

This model was designed to communicate the approach taken by nineteen community health and social services networks which positions them as drivers of change in mobilizing English-speaking communities. These community health and social services networks implement three key action strategies: improving access to health and social services, increasing the availability of health promotion and disease prevention programs, and fostering social innovation. This work is rooted in a number of principles and values that guide the development of the networks, with the ultimate aim of improving the health and well-being of English-speaking communities in Quebec and enhancing community vitality. For more information, please visit the CHSSN website.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

Consortium national de formation en santé (CNFS)

26. Educational Roadmap for Health Services in French [Itinéraire d'études en santé en français]

This information tool is designed for parents, guidance counsellors and teachers of grade 9 to 12 students who want to help them choose a health care career in French. The CNFS has developed this tool to help nurture the next generation of health professionals able to serve Francophones across Canada.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

27. Health Care Study Programs in French [Liste des programmes d'études en santé en français]

This reference provides a list of all current French-language postsecondary health programs sponsored by Health Canada through the Consortium national de formation en santé.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

28. Professional Excellence Program [Programme d'excellence professionnelle]

The Professional Excellence Program of the CNFS sponsors noon hour seminars on selected topics of interest to health professionals at the Montfort Hospital and across Eastern Ontario. Seminars are held at the Consortium facilities located within University of Ottawa and the Montfort Hospital and are broadcast on demand to videoconferencing sites located within the colleges and universities across Canada that are members or partners of the Consortium.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

Department of National Defence

29. Defence Administrative Orders and Directives (DAOD) 5039-3: "Support to Official Language Minority Communities and Recognition of English and French in Canadian Society"

Published in July 2010, this directive was developed under Part VII of the Official Languages Act. It aims to encourage corporate stakeholders (i.e. Level 1 coordinators, commanders, managers and employees responsible for developing policies and programs) to take positive measures in support of official language minority communities. These measures include awareness campaigns, consultations and communication.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-901-8881

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

30. Official Languages Minority Communities (OLMCs) Standardized Consultation Process and SharePoint

In order to fulfill its obligations to report on its consultations under Part IV of the Official Languages Act with Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs), ESDC established and schematized a standardized consultation process. This consultation process, which is hosted on a SharePoint, helps employees organize local consultations with OLMCs and provides them with the reporting tools and forms allowing the users throughout the Department to employ a uniform and coherent approach when reporting. Users can also produce reports on past consultations, as well as build repertoires of OLMC organizations.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada (FCFA)

31. Community Profiles

Profiles of the Francophone and Acadian Communities of Canada is a compendium of information on Francophone and Acadian communities at the national, provincial and territorial levels. It describes the situation of Canada's Francophonie as a whole and compares the realities of the French fact throughout Canada. Profiles is based on data from the 2006 federal census and is available in both official languages.

Diane Côté, d.cote@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600, ext. 4

32. Community Strategic Plan

One year after the June 2007 Summit of Francophone and Acadian Communities, 40 Francophonie organizations involved in the development of these communities adopted the Community Strategic Plan (not available in English), thus providing a vision for the future of the communities. This 10-year plan for cooperation and mobilization of the Francophone and Acadian communities with respect to the overall results and strategies identified at the summit defines concrete actions to make the summit vision a reality, with short-, medium- and long-term target dates. The plan is the key tool for Francophone and Acadian communities to take charge of their development.

Diane Côté, d.cote@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600, ext. 4

33. Immigration Portal

The portal for immigration in Canada's Francophone and Acadian communities is a gateway to a wealth of information on the communities themselves as well as services and resources for French-speaking immigrants. For over 250 organizations and institutions in various sectors of the Canadian Francophonie, brought together in 13 networks, the portal is also a source of information on all the partners working to recruit, welcome and integrate French-speaking newcomers to Canada.

Yasmina Kotevski, y.kotevski@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600, ext. 2

34. Map of French Language in Canada

This map, the product of a collaboration between the Ministerial Conference on the Canadian Francophonie and the FCFA, shows at a glance where Canada's French-speaking communities are. It also provides an overview of the communities' vitality at the national and provincial/territorial levels. The map is available in both official languages.

Diane Côté, d.cote@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600, ext. 4

35. The FCFA on Facebook

The FCFA's Facebook page (not available in English) shows the achievements of Francophone and Acadian communities, provides news about the FCFA and the directions it is taking, and lists interesting articles and resources on La Francophonie and linguistic duality. "Like" our page and gain access to a wealth of information and news about our communities!

Serge Quinty, s.quinty@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600, ext. 1

36. The FCFA on Twitter

The FCFA has two Twitter accounts. The first, @fcfacanada, gives live updates (not available in English) on the daily activities of the FCFA and its member organizations. The FCFA is especially prolific during its annual general assemblies and certain major events in which it participates. The second, @fcfaimmigration, gives daily updates (not available in English) on recent developments regarding immigration in Francophone and Acadian communities.

Serge Quinty, s.quinty@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600, ext.1 or Yasmina Kotevski, y.kotevski@fcfa.ca, 613-241-7600, ext. 2

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

37. Network of Part VII Coordinators

DFO has established a network of Coordinators in its regions and the Canadian Coast Guard for Part VII of the Official Languages Act. These Coordinators work to provide leadership for Part VII in their respective areas, including meeting with Official Language Minority Communities, sharing information, and collaborating internally and externally to support the spirit and letter of Part VII. The network of Coordinators is an important part of DFO's efforts to fulfill its Part VII obligations in a way that takes into account differences between different parts of the country.

Sarah.Kuiack@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, 613-993-0982

38. Official Languages Impact Analysis Form

The Department has developed an Official Languages Impact Analysis Form that is used to support its internal work by assisting officials in thinking through possible official languages implications. The impact analysis includes questions related to Part VII, as well as Parts IV, V, and VI. This helps DFO work to meet its Part VII obligations.

Sarah.Kuiack@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, 613-993-0982

39. Template for Tracking Part VII Work

The Department has developed a template to support its efforts to meet its Part VII obligations. This template is reviewed annually in the spirit of continuous improvement, and adjustments are made as needed.

Sarah.Kuiack@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, 613-993-0982

Health Canada

40. Consultation Reports with English and French Linguistic Minority Communities

These reports have helped to lay the foundations of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program, which is one of the elements of the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013–2018: Education, Immigration, Communities. As a result of these consultation reports, Health Canada has created a three-pronged strategy that targets human resources, networking and community health projects and is aimed at improving official language minority communities' access to health services. These reports are available on the Official Language Community Development bureau wiki on Health Canada's intranet and GCpedia.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

41. Official Language Community Development Bureau Wiki

This tool, which can be found on Health Canada's intranet and on GCpedia, provides information to support Health Canada managers and employees with respect to their responsibilities for the development of official language minority communities. All the information provided on the wikis is up to date in both official languages and is a model of bilingual communication in a Web 2.0 context for the Department.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

42. Official Language Minority Communities Studies and Statistics Disseminated or Funded by Health Canada

These studies are Language Barriers in Access to Health Care, prepared by Sarah Bowen for Health Canada, and Health Care Professionals and Official Language Minority Communities in Canada: 2001 and 2006, conducted by Statistics Canada and funded by Health Canada. To improve Anglophone and Francophone minority communities' access to health care, Health Canada has made these documents available as well as a CD-ROM containing statistics on health professionals and Census data on official language minority communities.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

43. Official Languages Health Contribution Program

This program was renewed in March 2013 as part of the federal government's Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-2018: Education, Immigration, Communities. The Program has the following objectives: 1) increased access to bilingual health professionals and intake staff in English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada (EFLMCs); and 2) increased offer of health services for English and French linguistic minority communities within health institutions and communities. A summary of the program is found on the Official Language Community Development Bureau wiki.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

44. Open Call for Proposals under Health Canada's Official Languages Health Contribution Program 2013-2018

Health Canada launched an open call for proposals under its Official Languages Health Contribution Program 2013-2018 for initiatives to address the health care challenges faced by English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada. As a result, several innovative projects were funded, such as the setting up of a multidisciplinary Francophone clinic in Calgary and the inclusion of language preference on the health card of Prince Edward Islanders, which will help to measure and improve their access to high-quality health services.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

45. Policy to Support Official Language Minority Communities

Health Canada adopted this internal policy in 2004 to encourage its program officials to raise awareness among communities, inform them of program funds that are available and work with them to identify means for improving consultation with them. Under this policy, Health Canada's branches and regional offices providing programs, activities or services for public activities must take into consideration the enhancement of the development of official language minority communities, within the spirit of Part VII of the Official Languages Act.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

46. Establishment of IRCC's Official Languages Secretariat

In 2014, IRCC established the Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) to provide a focal point responsible for the coordination of IRCC's obligations regarding the implementation of Part VII of the Official Languages Act (OLA). The OLS has undertaken various initiatives, including the launch of an awareness campaign to ensure that IRCC senior management and employees understand the Department's obligations under Part VII of the OLA. IRCC has also put in place a robust governance structure to ensure an integrated approach and consideration of official languages issues across the Department. The OLS was also created to support the Official Languages Champion and senior managers in their leadership activities and in the development of official languages action plans within the Department.

Contact: IRCC.OL.Secretariat-Secretariat.LO.IRCC@cic.gc.ca

47. Francophone Immigration Networks

IRCC currently supports 13 Francophone immigration networks (FINs) within Francophone minority communities across the country in order to solidify and strengthen efforts to economically, socially and culturally integrate French-speaking immigrants. The FINs focus their energies on the following local and regional activities: collaboration with stakeholders; identification of needs; development of plans and adapted strategies, and support for communities in implementing the plans and strategies.

Contact: IRCC.OL.Secretariat-Secretariat.LO.IRCC@cic.gc.ca

48. IRCC-Francophone Minority Communities (FMC) Committee

The IRCC-FMC Committee (Part VII) was created in 2013 and consists of 15 members: 7 from IRCC, 7 from FMCs and 1 representative from the provincial and territorial governments. The bi-annual meetings are an invaluable opportunity for dialogue between IRCC and community stakeholders in Francophone immigration. These activities allow for discussions on issues and the search for solutions.

Contact: IRCC.OL.Secretariat-Secretariat.LO.IRCC@cic.gc.ca

49. Presentation on IRCC's Obligations under Part VII of the Official Languages Act (OLA)

The Official Languages Secretariat team has developed a one-hour bilingual presentation to improve understanding of the Department's obligations under Part VII of the OLA. This presentation aims to raise awareness among managers as well as employees at the operational level based on branches' needs. Some tools and videos that were shared by other federal organizations through the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions are also used as support to this presentation.

Contact: IRCC.OL.Secretariat-Secretariat.LO.IRCC@cic.gc.ca

50. Use of New Media in Promotion of Francophone Minority Communities (FMC) Abroad

Visa offices abroad are organizing information sessions via Web conferencing, which makes it possible to reach a large number of candidates from around the world. A series of web conferences was organized with the help of the provinces and territories (with the exception of Quebec), and others were organized in collaboration with the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne (FCFA) to promote life in French and Francophone minority communities. Another series on employment opportunities in the various sectors of the Canadian economy was also organized. The growing use of social media (Facebook and Twitter) should also be noted, given their growing popularity worldwide, as they make it possible to reach a broader, more diverse audience.

Contact: IRCC.OL.Secretariat-Secretariat.LO.IRCC@cic.gc.ca

Infrastructure Canada (INFC)

51. Engaging Official Language Minority Communities

INFC contributes to the advancement of English and French in Canada by ensuring that communities and non-profit recipients, including official language minority communities (OLMCs), are eligible for funding under infrastructure programs managed by the Department, and by leveraging funding from other levels of government for capital projects that support community development. While the 2014 New Building Canada Fund focuses on infrastructure promoting economic growth, the eligibility of transportation and connectivity investments enables provinces and territories to improve the accessibility of remote communities. The indexed, permanent Gas Tax Fund (2014), designed to address local infrastructure pressures, now includes culture and recreation among its eligible categories of investment, providing an opportunity for local governments to address pressures in key areas of interest to OLMCs. A number of community infrastructure projects funded under INFC's past programs continue to provide venues for OLMCs to gather and for their culture and language to thrive. These projects have also encouraged the promotion of linguistic duality by exhibiting OLMCs culture, history and language to the majority language community.

Melanie.Laflamme2@canada.ca, 613-941-3167

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED)

52. Follow-up Committees

The Follow-up Committees (one Francophone and one Anglophone) are a consultative mechanism that allows representatives of ISED, regional development agencies and national community organizations to continue engaging in dialogue and consulting one another on an ongoing basis as well as identifying current economic development issues affecting Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs). These meetings are an opportunity for organizations representing OLMCs and federal institutions to work together and identify strategies and potential solutions and to support the Economic Development Initiative within the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-2018. A minimum of three meetings is held annually, either by conference call or face-to-face.

Linda.Garand@canada.ca, 613-889-7996

53. ISED Express

ISED Express is an electronic bulletin used to communicate with official language minority communities (OLMCs). ISED Express features a series of articles of interest to better inform economic development stakeholders in OLMCs and federal institutions. The bulletin is published three times a year and is hosted on the department's website. It's a best practice because the bulletin showcases articles stemming from federal institutions as well from Francophone and Anglophone minority community organizations. This strengthens the promotion of linguistic duality because it provides the general public with a clear understanding of issues affecting OLMCs. Moreover, the Department, through the bulletin, increases access to relevant business and regulations information for OLMCs.

Linda.Garand@canada.ca, 613-889-7996

Justice Canada

54. Departmental Network of Coordinators Responsible for the Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act

The Departmental Network of Coordinators Responsible for the Implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act (OLA), or Network 41, is one of the pillars of the implementation of section 41 of the OLA within the Department of Justice Canada. The network is made up of regional, program and policy coordinators. Regional coordinators are Department of Justice Canada lawyers. They work closely with the Official Languages Directorate (OLD), program and policy coordinators from the Department and their counterparts from other departments in their respective regions. They are also responsible for establishing close ties with community organizations. Program coordinators are responsible for managing the transfer payment programs, while policy coordinators help implement and evaluate these programs. The OLD manages Network 41, provides members with a collaborative SharePoint platform, organizes numerous work sessions via telepresence and holds an annual meeting in which members can network and coordinate future activities.

Michel.Francoeur@justice.gc.ca, 613-957-4967

Library and Archives Canada (LAC)

55. Working Group on Part VII of the Official Languages Act

To support LAC in meeting its obligations under Part VII of the Official Languages Act (OLA) and to foster the development of Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs), a working group was established. One of the objectives of the group is to learn about these communities, their realities and their needs. Each year, this working group meets with the OLMCs' representatives, the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada (FCFA) and the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN). In addition to allowing LAC to gain a better appreciation of the realities, challenges and needs of the OLMCs, these meetings help promote LAC's collections and services, and identify potential collaborations.

Claire.Lalonde@canada.ca, 613-797-3857

McGill University

56. Training and Retention of Health Professionals Project

The McGill Training and Retention of Health Professionals Project contributes to Quebec's initiatives to ensuring English-speaking Quebecers have access to the full range of health and social services in their own language through measures designed to build and maintain a sufficient complement of health and social services personnel capable of providing services in English. The project is an additional tool to support the implementation and enhancement of regional programs of access to health and social services in English as provided for in the Act respecting health and social services.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

57. Annual Report 2010–2011

Part VII of the Official Languages Act is one of the primary tools for ensuring that linguistic duality remains a value and a characteristic that strengthens our country's unity and contributes to Canada's economic, cultural and social development and international reputation. The 2010–2011 Annual Report of the Commissioner of Official Languages examines the support provided by federal departments and agencies for the development of English-speaking communities in Quebec and French-speaking communities in the rest of Canada, as well as their support for the promotion of linguistic duality in Canadian society. There is no miracle solution or universal cure to ensure that all federal departments and agencies meet their obligations under the Act. Compliance with the Act requires novel approaches and new ways of doing things. Federal organizations must take positive measures by undertaking concrete initiatives.

Nelson.Kalil@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4714

58. Early Childhood: Fostering the Vitality of Francophone Minority Communities

On October 3, 2016, the Commissioner of Official Languages released a report titled Early Childhood: Fostering the Vitality of Francophone Minority Communities. The report presents an overview of early childhood in Francophone minority communities in order to identify key issues and opportunities. It also contains recommendations addressed to the Government of Canada, given the federal government's commitment under Part VII of the Official Languages Act and the resulting obligations of federal institutions.

Marjie.Brown@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4788

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

59. Regional Official Languages Coordinators

In early 2014, the PPSC established a network of regional Official Languages Coordinators. These coordinators are responsible for Part VII of the Official Languages Act and the establishment of interdepartmental regional cells to foster collaboration between federal institutions in order to meet the needs of minority official languages communities.

Robert.Doyle@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca, 613-952-0267

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

60. Official Languages Toolkits for National Capital Region Tenants

Language toolkits have been given to commercial tenants of PSPC buildings in the National Capital Region. The toolkit contains language tools, such as a glossary of useful words and expressions; bilingual signage (i.e. "Open/Ouvert" and "Closed/Fermé" signs); badges for practising a second official language (i.e. "Parlez-moi en français s.v.p. J'apprends!"); a leaflet describing language services available to merchants, including low-cost translation services; oral communication workshops given in French and tailored to the service sector; and tips for recruiting bilingual staff. In the same kit, PSPC provides its commercial tenants with an official languages newsletter in which the Department promotes the Language Portal of Canada and lists the advantages of providing bilingual services.

Linda Van Der Grient, linda.vandergrient@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 873-469-3304

Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN)

61. Facebook Page

The QCGN Facebook page helps spread the word about events organized by the English-speaking community network in Quebec. The page shares news and photos, including pictures of various events and articles about the QCGN and the community. It also encourages informal discussions between followers about issues related to official languages. "Like" and follow our page to receive notifications!

Guillaume.Lajoie@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044, ext. 227

62. Network News

The QCGN's Network News is a bi-monthly newsletter that goes out to more than 500 stakeholders and member organizations of the QCGN as well as members of the English-speaking community network. The newsletter, which includes a column from the President on the activities of the QCGN, contains stories about our projects and activities, plus features and stories about our members and stakeholders. The goal of this newsletter is to keep the community informed about the activities of the Network. You can view recent issues of the Network News on our website, where you can also subscribe at this link: http://qcgn.ca/news/network-news/.

Rita.Legault@qcgn.ca or info@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044, ext. 223

63. QCGN "Daily Briefing" Electronic Bulletin

The Daily Briefing, which is sent out to more than 1,200 subscribers every day, is an electronic clipping service that includes news and views from and about our Network and community throughout the province as well as articles on issues that affect Quebec's English-speaking minority community and official language minority communities in Canada and beyond. It features a searchable archive that allows subscribers to recover past articles. Click here to subscribe.

Guillaume.Lajoie@qcgn.ca , 514-868-9044, ext. 227

64. QCGN Website

The QCGN website underwent a major facelift in 2016 with a brand new look and updated content to better inform member organizations, community stakeholders, provincial and national partners, the media and the general public. With the majority of content published in both official languages, the website is constantly updated to reflect current issues affecting the development of Quebec's English-speaking communities. As well as a news feed on the landing page, it contains a section dedicated to QCGN members, a large variety of QCGN, community and government publications and resources, a media room with press releases and media coverage, and a calendar of upcoming events in the network and community.

Guillaume.Lajoie@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044, ext. 227

65. Sheila and Victor Goldbloom Distinguished Community Service Award

The Sheila and Victor Goldbloom Distinguished Community Service Award was established by the QCGN in 2009 to celebrate individuals who have gone above and beyond in contributing to the vitality and understanding of English-speaking Quebec. The award celebrates individuals like Victor and Sheila Goldbloom who have dedicated their lives to ensuring English-speaking Quebec remains a vibrant community within Quebec and Canada. The award ceremony takes place every October during a celebration of the English-speaking community of Quebec.

Rita.Legault@qcgn.ca or info@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044, ext. 223

66. The Strategic Priorities Forum and the 2012–2017 Community Development Plan

The Strategic Priorities Forum is a five-year cyclical process where Quebec's English-speaking community sets its priorities to ensure a vital and sustainable future. Launched in the fall of 2011 with a series of consultations in various regions and sectors of the province, it culminated in a Community Priority Setting Conference on March 23, 2012, where more than 200 community leaders and members achieved consensus on community priorities that would lead the community to a more sustainable and vital future. The QCGN's Priority Setting Steering Committee (PSSC), which led the process, signed a Declaration of the English-speaking Community of Quebec, which urged the community to work individually and collectively in a collaborative environment to develop and implement strategies that support these priorities. Following the conference, the QCGN and the PSSC also created a community development plan entitled 2012–2017 Community Priorities and Enabling Strategies of the English-speaking Community of Quebec. For details on the process, go to http://qcgn.ca/home/community-priorities.

Stephen.Thompson@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044, ext. 228

67. The Young Quebecers Leading the Way Award

The Young Quebecers Leading the Way Award was established by The Quebec Community Groups Network, the Fondation Notre Home Foundation and CBC Quebec in 2015 to recognize and celebrate the outstanding achievements of young English-speaking Quebecers who are engaged in innovative initiatives that create change in our communities. For this award, leadership is defined broadly and not limited to leaders of specific organizations and projects. The main objective of the Young Quebecers Leading the Way Award is to celebrate the leadership and innovative thinking of engaged young English-speaking Quebecers.

Rita.Legault@qcgn.ca or info@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044, ext. 223

68. Twitter Account (@QCGN)

The QCGN Twitter feed shares links and updates on news about the QCGN and the English-speaking communities of Quebec and links to QCGN press releases. We also use the Twitter account to generate discussion surrounding our events as well as to allow our partners and the public to interact and discuss specific topics. Follow us!

Guillaume.Lajoie@qcgn.ca, 514-868-9044, ext. 227

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

69. Information Kit for New Francophone Officers and Their Families

An information kit is distributed to new Francophone officers and their families who are posted to regions where they must work and live in their second official language. These kits contain documentation on the RCMP Official Languages Program, as well as information on the various services and programs available to them in the local official language minority communities.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

70. Network of Stakeholders

The RCMP sits on the Network of Stakeholders working in the field of justice and security. The goals include exchanging information about practices, mechanisms and knowledge pertaining to justice and security issues in the area of official languages. It is also intended to enable institutions in the Network to develop shared mechanisms for consulting and engaging with communities, to make services available to Anglophone and Francophone minorities.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

71. Official Language Minority Communities Satisfaction Questionnaire

To address possible concerns regarding its services, the RCMP consults with Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs) at roundtable discussions, where it hands out the above satisfaction questionnaire to ensure that the discussions met the attendees' needs, including the provision of adequate services in their language of choice.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

72. Pan-Canada Training Program

This program was developed in partnership with the Centre canadien de français juridique inc. (CCFJ). The first training session took place in February 2016 at the RCMP Police Training Academy in Regina, Saskatchewan. This training session brought together about sixty participants including Crown attorneys, probation officers, court interpreters and court clerks from all provinces and territories (except Ontario and Quebec). The goal of this program is to help improve French language skills, specifically within the judicial context. This knowledge and information will undoubtedly allow participants to improve their work with the French-speaking litigants, thus helping to improve access to judicial services in French within the communities across Canada.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

73. RCMP Community Roundtables

The RCMP consults with Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs) on a regular and permanent basis through its regional roundtables. Three are established in the Northwest region, more precisely in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.  These working groups allow the RCMP and the Francophone communities to better understand each other's priorities and mandate, and to identify areas for OLMCs development.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Société Santé en français (SSF)

74. National Survey on the Health of French Linguistic Minority Communities in Canada

With support from Health Canada and Canadian Heritage, the Société Santé en français undertook a pan-Canadian survey of French linguistic minority communities in order to assess their access to health services and to support the renewal of the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-2018: Education, Immigration, Communities. The report on the findings from the survey was released in June 2014.

Roger.Guillemette@canada.ca, 613-952-2035

Statistics Canada

75. 2011 Census and 2011 National Household Survey

Statistics Canada released two important products on official languages and official-language minorities in Canada. Released on March 26, 2014, the Portrait of Official-Language Communities in Canada: 2011 Census and 2011 National Household Survey replaces the product of the same name released in DVD format and based on 2006 Census data. This is a statistical portrait of English and French groups defined by either mother tongue or first official language spoken. For each province and territory and for census divisions and their constituent municipalities, using 2011 Census data and 2011 National Household Survey, users can draw a profile of the official-language communities, by gender, based on selected demographic, cultural, education, labour force and income characteristics.

On April 17, 2014, Statistics Canada released a video entitled Portrait of Official-Language Minorities in Canada. It presents a range of information on a variety of topics and issues of interest to official-language minorities and to anyone interested in the past, present and future of official-language minority populations in Canada. It also provides a glimpse at the current situation of the country's francophone and anglophone minorities. The video summarizes and updates the analyses that Statistics Canada released in the Portraits of Official-Language Minorities in Canada series. These portraits are based on a wide range of statistics drawn from the Censuses of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities.

Jean-Pierre.Corbeil@canada.ca, 613-850-4762

76. Portrait of Official-Language Minorities in Canada

In 2011 and 2012, Statistics Canada published 11 detailed provincial and territorial portraits of official-language minorities in Canada on its website. Each portrait contains a wealth of statistics on various characteristics of these minorities. In addition to demographic data, the portraits provide information on areas considered a priority by official language minority communities, such as health, media, arts and culture, immigration and justice. They also include useful information on employment and income characteristics, subjective vitality and linguistic identity. Much of the data in these portraits were taken from the population censuses and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities, which Statistics Canada conducted after the 2006 census.

Jean-Pierre.Corbeil@canada.ca, 613-850-4762

77. Reference Guide—Data on Official Language Minorities

In May 2013, Statistics Canada published the second edition of Statistics Canada Data Sources on Official-Language Minorities, a detailed reference tool on the various sources of language information available to users of Statistics Canada data.

Jean-Pierre.Corbeil@canada.ca, 613-850-4762

Communications with and Services to the Public (Part IV of the OLA)

Air Canada

1. Aerovocab Booklet

This booklet provides airport agents, baggage agents and flight attendants with quick and easy access to words frequently used in the airline industry.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

2. French Support Line

A French support line has been made available to all employees worldwide, accessible through the Air Canada Call Centre (1-800 number for support in French). The support line offers an additional option to agents who need help in French to serve Francophone customers and cannot obtain assistance from a bilingual colleague within an acceptable time period.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

3. Hello/Bonjour Banners

Hello/Bonjour banners to promote active offer have been installed in flight attendants' communication centres and are also used in different events/activities.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

4. Language Pins

These pins tell customers in which language an airport agent or flight attendant can serve them in.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

5. Language Recognition Award

The Dialogue Award was created to recognize the exceptional conduct of front-line employees who support Air Canada's commitment to serve its customers in both of Canada's official languages. Throughout the year, colleagues and supervisors who wish to submit the name of an employee who has demonstrated conduct that reflects the company's values and commitments can nominate the person via our recognition program platform "Shine" on our portal. Through a section of enRoute magazine, which is available onboard, customers are also invited to submit the name of an employee recognized for providing excellent service in the customer's language of choice.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

6. Online Module for Raising Awareness on Language Obligations

This module on Air Canada's language obligations was developed for front-line employees to allow them to see, through the customer experience, how to make an active offer, how to intervene when an employee is not bilingual and how to meet customer expectations.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

7. Video on Active Offer

A Bonjour/Hello video has been developed to explain and promote the active offer.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

8. Bilingual Voice Mail/Electronic Messages

This document provides examples of bilingual voice mail/electronic messages along with an explanation of the Official Languages Act requirements as it relates to active offer.

Ginette.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-851-6508

9. Official Languages Guidelines—ACOA Obligations for Communications with and Services to the Public

This document provides ACOA employees and employees of organizations acting on behalf of ACOA with information on their roles and responsibilities with respect to providing service to the public in both official languages. It also explains ACOA's official languages obligations for offices that are designated bilingual, for those that are designated unilingual and for websites. This document is available on ACOA's intranet site.

Ginette.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-851-6508

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

10. Official Languages Pocket Translator

This tool was launched in 2009 for the Vancouver Olympic Games. It features key phrases for making a quality active offer that officers can refer to quickly. The pocket translator is laminated so that officers can keep it beside their ID card.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

11. Training Session: A Quality Bilingual Greeting (active offer)

This 20-minute online training session helps CBSA employees gain a better understanding of their obligations under the Official Languages Act. The training covers why an active offer is provided and how to provide this service effectively on the phone and in person. Launched in 2009 for the Vancouver Olympic Games, this training is still being used by officers on a regular basis and is available through the CBSA's Self-Service Portal.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development Agency for the Quebec Regions (CED)

12. Bilingual Out-of-Office Messages

The purpose of this series of bilingual messages is to help employees draft their own greeting messages. The document is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

13. E-mail Signature Block

This tool helps employees draft their bilingual signature block. The document is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

14. Procedure on the Active Offer of Service in Both Official Languages

This document informs employees of the procedure for making an active offer of service in person, by telephone and in writing. It provides sample voice mail messages and signature blocks for employees who hold bilingual or unilingual positions. It is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

15. Bilingual Cue Card

This cue card features key words and useful phrases in English and French that screening officers can refer to quickly to better serve passengers in their official language of choice. It is designed to be attached to screening officers' security pass clips.

Rhoda.Boyd@catsa-acsta.gc.ca, 613-949-6463

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

16. Employee's Guide to Delivering Services in Both Official Languages

This guide, which can be found in the Official Languages Resource Centre section of the CFIA's intranet, provides information on the roles and responsibilities of employees who are required to provide service in both official languages, an English-French glossary of terms, common expressions in English and French, and tips and reminders for providing service in both official languages in person and over the phone.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

17. Mousepad to Promote the Active Offer of Service

The CFIA has designed a mousepad to highlight the importance of the active offer and to raise awareness of the CFIA Complaints Portal. This mousepad shows how the active offer can be made and reminds all employees that it should be done at all times.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

18. Official Languages Training Module for New Agency Inspectors

To help the Agency's new inspectors understand the key role that official languages plays at the Agency and in their service to Canadians, the CFIA developed and introduced the Official Languages Training Module for delivery at the CFIA Pre-Requisite Employment Program (PREP) for Agency inspectors.

Jean.Chiasson@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6672

19. Video on the Active Office of Service

The CFIA has launched the "Active Offer of Service in Designated Bilingual Offices" video. The Active Offer video, available to all employees via the Official Languages Centre section of the CFIA's intranet, is intended for employees and managers who work in offices that must provide bilingual services to the public as required under the Official Languages Act.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

Correctional Service Canada (CSC)

20. Active Offer Video

In order to improve communications and services to the public, a video on active offer, of approximately seven minutes' duration, has been developed to educate employees on the importance of greeting clients in both official languages at all times. The video focuses on active offer as an integral part of service excellence and provides practical tips, as well as concrete examples.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

21. Information Sheet on Practical Expressions for Active Offer

This information sheet contains practical expressions with details on their pronunciation to help employees welcome members of the public in English and French, as well as details on how to effectively provide an active offer in person, on the phone and by means of visual symbols in designated bilingual sites.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

22. Pocket Card for Active Offer

This pocket card contains basic expressions designed for unilingual employees working in reception areas who, in certain exceptional circumstances, must greet a member of the public from an official language minority community before referring the person to a bilingual colleague.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

Department of National Defence

23. Active Offer Tent Card

This tent card, entitled Active Offer of Services in Both Official Languages, defines and describes the concept of an active offer of services and suggests concrete ways of putting it into practice in the workplace. It reminds employees working in designated bilingual offices or regions to clearly show their ability to serve the public in both official languages.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-901-8881

24. Template PowerPoint Presentations on Part IV

Presentations have been prepared for offices that provide services to the public. These include Public Affairs Offices, Recruiting Centres and Detachments, and Joint Rescue Coordination Centres. The presentations highlight the right of members of the public to be served in the official language of their choice and contain consistent messaging for all employees.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-901-8881

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

25. Active Offer Video: At the Heart of Service Excellence

This 3.5-minute video is the first in a series of videos designed to inform ESDC's employees of their obligations under the Official Languages Act (OLA). At the Heart of Service Excellence was developed to help employees who serve the public understand how to make an active offer of service in both official languages. It informs front-line employees about their obligations under the OLA with regard to communications with and services to the public, and focuses on active offer as an essential part of service excellence. The video includes clear examples on how to greet clients with an active offer of service in both official languages. At the Heart of Service Excellence has also been integrated into the Department's training sessions and online official languages training modules. The video is available on GCpedia.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

26. Bilingual Keyboards

Since 2013, ESDC provides bilingual keyboards for citizen use in all Service Canada Centres across the country.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

27. Cheat Sheet: Part IV Official Languages Obligations and the Use of Web Communications and Social Media

ESDC has developed a concise and creative cheat sheet which is a colourful quick reference tool outlining key information based on the Treasury Board of Canada's Official Languages Policy and related instruments associated with web and social media communications with the public. It includes various sections organized by topic. Each topic summarizes a requirement related to the institution's obligations under Part IV of the Official Languages Act. The cheat sheet serves as a helpful reminder for employees who are required to develop and edit content for the web and social media. It does not alter, extend or override existing TBS policy instruments. Cheat sheet available on GCpedia.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

28. Directive on Official Languages Obligations in Bilingual Service Canada Centres and Scheduled Outreach Sites

This directive is designed to provide a consistent national approach to service delivery through ESDC's bilingual points of service and scheduled outreach sites across the country and to ensure that the Department meets its official languages obligations under Part IV of the Official Languages Act and related Government of Canada policies. In implementing the directive, the Department has started the standardization of the language profiles of Citizen Service Officer positions, implemented a national standard for determining the minimum number of bilingual positions required in a bilingual office, and deployed a standardized Official Language Minority Communities consultation process.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

29. Directive on Official Languages Obligations in Unilingual Service Canada Offices

This directive, which was created in December 2011, is designed to provide a consistent national approach to service delivery through unilingual points of service across the country and ensure that ESDC meets its official languages obligations under Part IV of the Official Languages Act and related Government of Canada policies.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

30. Mutual Assistance between Offices – Atlantic

Since 2012, offices in the Atlantic Region of ESDC have been assisting each other to serve Francophone clients in unilingual offices. By law, employees in unilingual offices are not required to serve clients in the language of their choice but must be able to refer them to the nearest bilingual Service Canada Centre (SCC). Referral to the nearest bilingual SCC is not always the best option, given the region's demographics. This initiative was therefore developed to better meet the needs of Francophone clients visiting unilingual offices. Using the instant messaging software, an agent in a unilingual office can communicate with colleagues located in neighbouring bilingual offices in order to identify an available bilingual agent to serve the Francophone client. Thanks to this initiative, clients now have two service options: being served on site by communicating on the phone with a bilingual agent located in a nearby office or being referred to the nearest bilingual SCC.

Francine.Guerette@servicecanada.gc.ca, 506-777-6428

31. Team Leader Engagement on Active Offer Monitoring

Service Canada Centre team leaders across the Atlantic Region of ESDC play an active role in active offer monitoring in their designated offices and send their monitoring results to the regional Business Expertise Unit for analysis. An active offer monitoring tool has been developed to record observations of the active offer of service and to make suggestions or recommendations for improved service. The observation tool identifies key areas to review when monitoring the active offer of service. The tool can be used to discuss progress, issues and recommendations with managers, supervisors and team leaders and to remind them of the importance of complete adherence to the Official Languages Act. It can also be used as a self-help tool for monitoring the active offer of service.

Becky.Savoie@servicecanada.gc.ca, 902-536-4006

32. Telephone Interpretation Service – Service Canada Centres

As of August 15, 2011, ESDC offers an official languages telephone interpretation service in all its Service Canada unilingual offices, which provides immediate access to a professional interpreter. This service aims to enhance the experience of Canadians who prefer to be served in the minority official language and is part of ESDC's commitment to provide excellent service to Canadians in both official languages.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario

33. Active Offer Toolkit: Bring it! Speak it! Use it!

The active offer toolkit is one of the many ways in which we are helping to build our bilingual capacity at FedDev Ontario. The toolkit is designed to help employees indicate to members of the public that they are free to choose which official language they wish to be served in and, perhaps more importantly, that the employees feel comfortable using both official languages. The toolkit includes information on the active offer process, including instructions and sample messages, an active offer checklist describing key practices for FedDev Ontario offices, frequently used expressions and frequently asked questions. The toolkit also includes greetings to use with the public, FedDev Ontario's voice mail messages and visual cues (such as signs with written text and the official languages symbol), and useful tips to help guide staff in providing bilingual services. This toolkit was distributed to staff and is also available on FedDev Ontario's intranet.

Patrick.Giroux@canada.ca, 416-543-2422

Global Affairs Canada (GAC)

34. Toolkits on Official Languages and on Active Offer of Service

The kits were designed to respond to employee needs regarding official languages and to increase bilingual capacity within Global Affairs Canada. These kits include a process for active offer of services and give instructions and examples of messages. They are accessible on the Intranet in order to inform employees on their roles and responsibilities and to encourage them to integrate official languages into their daily work environment. Those kits help employees provide an active verbal, written or visual offer, hold bilingual meetings and provide key phrases to offer bilingual service by telephone, e-mail, or in person. They also include tools for promoting and raising awareness of official languages.

Suzanne.Tannouri@international.gc.ca, 343-203-2003

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

35. Active Offer Poster

This poster reminds employees of the importance of greeting clients in both official languages at all times to ensure that Canadians are served in their official language of choice in all regions of the country.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

36. Directive on Communications with and Services to the Public

The objective of this directive is to present the rights of the public to be served in the official language of their choice in all designated bilingual offices and to assist managers and employees at Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada who communicate with and provide services to the public in understanding and meeting their obligations in this regard.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

37. Document: Elements of Service to the Public to be Offered in Both Official Languages

This document provides English-Français and Français-English pictograms and all the elements of service to the public that must be offered in both official languages and delivered in the clients' official language of choice.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

38. Frequently Used Bilingual Phrases

This list of frequently used bilingual phrases can be used in all reception situations, whether on the phone or in person.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

39. Guide on Elements of Communications with and Services to the Public to be Provided in Both Official Languages

The purpose of this guide is to set out and ensure respect of the public's right to be served in the official language of their choice by institutions subject to the Official Languages Act. This guide is also intended to inform managers and employees who serve the public about elements that must be made available to the public in both official languages. These elements are described in this guide.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

40. "Hello/Bonjour" Service to the Public Toolkit

The "Hello/Bonjour" Service to the Public toolkit was created for employees who deal directly with the public and are therefore the first point of contact for millions of Canadians who use both departments' services. The toolkit contains examples of bilingual telephone and e-mail greetings, a list of common phrases in both official languages, an explanation of what employees can do to ensure that they implement the active offer on a daily basis, and many more tools to help employees better serve Canadians in their official language of choice.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

41. "Hello/Bonjour" Sticker

This sticker can be affixed to a computer screen, a telephone receiver or any other readily accessible area to remind employees that they must greet members of the public in both official languages at all times.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

42. "Hello/Bonjour" Video on the Active Offer of Service to the Public

This video, approximately eight minutes long, provides practical tips and concrete examples to make front-line employees aware of the importance of greeting clients in both official languages at all times, so that Canadians are served in their official language of choice in all regions of the country.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

43. "One Moment Please" Card

This card is intended for employees in unilingual regions who must, under certain exceptional circumstances, greet a member of the public from an official language minority community before referring the person to a bilingual colleague.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

44. One-Pager: Communications with and Services to the Public

This document is available to all managers and employees of Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada. It gives an overview of our obligations on services to the public and includes the following subjects: active offer and services to the public, use of social media, order of precedence of the official languages, communications with Canadian citizens who speak languages other than English and French, and contracts. 

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

45. Service to the Public Brochure

The Service to the Public brochure contains information on the Official Languages Act and related policies, as well as recommendations on how to effectively serve the Canadian public in both official languages.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

46. The "Hello/Bonjour" Video's Online Comprehension Test

The online test that accompanies the Service to the Public video is available to both departments' employees on Health Canada's and the Public Health Agency of Canada's intranet site. Managers who supervise employees who serve the public must ensure that their employees take the test in order to verify that they fully understand their responsibilities and are familiar with the basics of excellent service to the public, as explained in the video.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

47. Welcoming Messages (on the Telephone, in Person, by E-mail)

This series of bilingual messages helps employees create their own messages.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

48. Managers Self-Assessment Checklist for Communications with and Services to the Public

This simple, comprehensive tool has been developed to assist managers in their continued efforts to ensure that their team delivers effective, responsive services to the clients in their preferred official language.

Contact: CIC-OL-LO@cic.gc.ca

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED)

49. Conference Checklist

Managing a public event of local, national or international scope will bring together English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians. This checklist of suggestions will help ensure that the participants feel welcome and know that services will be available in both official languages before, during and after the event.

Dominique.Jolicoeur@canada.ca, 343-291-3150

50. From Bonjour to Au revoir Bilingual Card with Key Phrases for Service on the Telephone or in Person

This card features key words and useful phrases in English and French that employees can refer to quickly to better serve clients in their official language of choice. (The card is available electronically and on paper.)

Dominique.Jolicoeur@canada.ca, 343-291-3150

51. Guides on the Active Offer of Service in Both Official Languages

These guides contain information and procedures for employees to provide an active offer of service across a variety of service delivery channels. ISED adapted these guides – one for the Active Offer in Quebec, with French first, and one for the Active Offer in all other provinces and territories, with English first – that were originally developed by the Public Service Commission of Canada to help departmental employees serve clients across the country in the official language of their choice. The guides are available on the Department's intranet site.

Dominique.Jolicoeur@canada.ca, 343-291-3150

National Capital Commission (NCC)

52. NCC Website

The NCC has a bilingual website, and all NCC programs and services are offered in English and French, the two official languages of Canada. The site has a section on NCC's objectives concerning the Official Languages Act.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, ext. 5277

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

53. Video on Active Offer

This video ensures that all employees are aware of their obligations with respect to communications and service delivery. In addition to raising awareness among employees, the video provides instructions on how to clearly make an active offer of service in both official languages.

Marie Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mariemadeleine.chourouba@canada.ca, 343-292-8455

54. "Would you know what to say?" Posters on Active Offer Over the Phone

These posters direct employees to the video on making an active offer of service in both official languages, as well as to the official languages wiki, which has a host of tools to help revitalize the use of both official languages in the Department. The posters are also used to promote and raise awareness of both official languages.

Marie Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mariemadeleine.chourouba@canada.ca, 343-292-8455

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

55. Bilingual Greetings in Federal Institutions: Let's talk about it!

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has noted that federal institutions struggle to provide an active offer routinely and consistently in situations where they are in direct contact with the public. However, despite attempts to rectify the situation, a number of institutions continue to experience difficulties. In light of this situation, the Office of the Commissioner wanted to determine whether certain factors, such as human or environmental factors, contribute to problems regarding the provision of active offer. This study, which was published in July 2016, explores the work environments and the individual mindedness and beliefs that can help ensure a successful active offer or result in an inadequate one.

Diane.Allard@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4690

Parks Canada

56. Commercial Leases Toolkit

Forty-five years ago, the Official Languages Act triggered a series of changes in society that contributed to moulding a modern Canadian identity – one that strives to respect the character and aspirations of both major language communities in Canada. As a federal agency, Parks Canada is committed to a leadership role in striving to foster and enhance bilingual services as set out in the Official Languages Act. In its continuing effort to encourage the use of both official languages in Canada, an official language clause regarding bilingual services has been included in all commercial leases issued since 1973. Parks Canada has developed a toolkit aimed at encouraging its commercial tenants to provide services to the public in both official languages. The kit contains practical tips on providing services in both official languages. The toolkit is randomly supplied to 5 to 10 percent of the Agency's existing commercial tenants on an annual basis. The toolkit is also available upon request.

Judy.Hersey@pc.gc.ca, 819-420-5060

57. Hello! Bonjour! Toolkit

The Hello! Bonjour! toolkit is a suite of national training tools consisting of a video, a workbook and an audio CD. The bilingual kit contains useful tools that can be applied by staff so that they may become at ease when greeting and serving Canadians across the country and it helps Parks Canada meet its client service objectives. The toolkit is an integral training component within the Parks Canada Quality Service Standards for Visitors, particularly as it pertains to meeting the Agency's first service standard: "Greet you in both official languages."

Contact: LO-OL@pc.gc.ca

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

58. Welcome Messages (Telephone or E-mail)

Before the summer vacation period, a reminder is sent to all employees in bilingual positions concerning the importance of having bilingual out-of-office messages. A series of bilingual messages is posted on the PPSC website to help employees develop their own phone or e-mail message.

Contact: Human Resources Administration Unit, HRAU-UARH@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca

Public Service Commission of Canada

59. Active Offer Guide

This guide provides practical tips, key phrases and information on how to use standard greetings and salutations, record voice mail greetings and prepare signature blocks. The guide also contains an active offer checklist.

Lyne.Vaillancourt@cfp-psc.gc.ca, 819-420-6628

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

60. Active Offer of Service in Both Official Languages Handbook

This handbook for PSPC employees provides information on service delivery in both official languages.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

61. Quick Reference on Active Offer

This checklist ensures that PSPC employees involved in the active offer of service do not overlook anything.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

62. Useful Expressions for Greeting the Public Handbook

This handbook for PSPC employees contains a list of useful expressions for providing bilingual service.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

63. Name Tags for Bilingual Police Officers

The public will be able to easily locate RCMP officers who are able to communicate and provide services in both official languages. Police officers who occupy a bilingual position will now be identified by the official languages symbol displayed on the name tag of their uniform.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

64. Official Languages and Social Media

This document was developed by the RCMP New Media Section to inform regional employees of their official languages obligations when using social media sites to communicate with the public. The document includes a list of designated bilingual offices as well as a chart outlining the type of content that is required to be posted in both official languages.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Statistics Canada

65. Personalized Voice Mail Greetings

This list of bilingual messages with instructions helps employees create a voice mail greeting in both official languages. It includes examples of messages for a regular work day and for short and extended absences.

Jean.Duval@canada.ca, 613-404-2402

Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC)

66. Bilingual Out-of-Office Messages

Prior to the holiday season, an e-mail with a template of bilingual out-of-office messages is sent to all employees as a reminder of official languages obligations for out-of-office e-mail and telephone messages. The template can be used to help employees draft their own out-of-office messages.

Contact: VAC.CorporateResourcing-RessourcementMinisteriel.ACC@vac-acc.gc.ca

Complaints

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

1. Official Languages Complaints Process

This document, which is available on ACOA's intranet site, explains when and how an ACOA employee can make an official languages complaint.

Ginette.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-851-6508

Canada Economic Development Agency for the Quebec Regions (CED)

2. Directive on the Management of Official Languages Complaints

This directive indicates the roles and responsibilities associated with and steps for investigating and resolving official languages complaints. The document is available on the Agency's intranet site. The Agency also has an online form where customers can inform us of their dissatisfaction (including the official language in which they have been served).

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

3. Creation of a Complaints Follow-Up Grid

The CFIA has put in place a follow-up monitoring system for all complaints received by way of the electronic address. This allows us to document the follow-up that was done with each file.

Pierre.Girard@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6670

4. E-mail Address for Receiving Complaints

The CFIA has created an e-mail address for receiving employees' complaints relating to official languages. These complaints are then discussed with the appropriate authorities to find solutions.

Pierre.Girard@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6670

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

5. Reference Tool for Processing Official Languages Complaints

This document was developed for use by employees of ESDC who are required to deal with official languages complaints. This reference tool provides them with information on how to deal with complaints and investigations from the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages regarding parts IV, V, VI, and VII and section 91 of the Official Languages Act. This guide contains clear, easy-to-follow instructions, procedures and examples.

NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

6. Strategy for the Processing of Complaints

ESDC developed a strategy for processing official languages complaints received from the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages (OCOL). A comprehensive review of the official languages complaints resolution internal processes was carried out and each process graphically documented to clearly define the roles and responsibilities of all key players. To consult the processes, refer to the GCpedia page. In addition, a complaints case management business solution was built in a SharePoint 2010 environment.  The solution includes libraries and a database to record and manage each phase of the official languages  complaints resolution processes.  It provides ESDC's official languages centres of expertise with the ability to manage OCOL complaints efficiently, access accurate and detailed complaint information in real time, and extract data to produce various statistical executive reports.

NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

7. Guidelines for Official Languages Complaints

These guidelines set out the roles and responsibilities of the parties involved in the official languages complaints process.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

8. Document: Filing a Complaint with the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

This document explains when and how to file a complaint with the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. It is available in HTML and PDF formats, or a booklet can be ordered.

Antonia.Papadakou@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4702

Language of Work (Part V of the OLA)

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

1. Language of Work at ACOA–Rights and Responsibilities

This document, available on ACOA's intranet site, provides information to ACOA employees on their rights and obligations with respect to language of work. It also explains the responsibility of ACOA offices that are designated unilingual and those that are designated bilingual for language of work purposes.

Ginette.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-851-6508

2. Tips for Chairing a Bilingual Meeting

This document provide tips for chairing bilingual meetings, held in a designated bilingual region for language of work purposes and at which participants from both linguistic communities are present.

Ginette.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-851-6508

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

3. Information Session on Language of Work for Human Resources Advisors

This session aims to train HR advisors on obligations related to staffing of bilingual positions. It addresses acting appointments, administrative measures, linguistic profiles and complaints.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

4. Tools to Support Human Resources Advisors and Managers

The CBSA has developed tools related to official languages to facilitate the work of human resources advisors and to support managers when it comes to human resources processes related to official languages. These tools will allow the CBSA to clarify and standardize processes for staffing bilingual positions and determining the linguistic profiles of positions. The introduction of these tools will allow the CBSA to ensure better monitoring of official languages issues and to better exercise its stewardship.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development Agency for the Quebec Regions (CED)

5. Bilingual Meetings Poster

This poster is displayed in every meeting room. It encourages employees to speak in the language of their choice during meetings.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

6. Pyramid on Holding Bilingual Meetings

This pyramid provides a few tips on how to hold bilingual meetings. These pyramids are placed on the tables in the meeting rooms.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

Canada Post

7. Bookmark

This bookmark provides a list of French characters for employees working with an English keyboard.

France.Coulombe@canadapost.postescanada.ca, 613-734-6398

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

8. Ambassador Program

Last year, one Branch within the CRA created an Official Languages Ambassador Program. The official languages ambassadors acted as liaison between their respective divisions and the Official Languages Program team members. They organized fun promotional activities at various times during the year (i.e. Olympics, bilingual meetings, musical Fridays and the Christmas calendar), shared information on official languages with their divisional colleagues, provided updates, created or assisted with various official languages event. Their efforts increased the visibility of official languages within each division and promoted conduciveness within the workplace.

Sari.Abdallah@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-853-0611

Canada School of Public Service

9. Bilingual Meetings

An informal video explaining how to hold bilingual meetings is available on the School's intranet.

Robert.Beaumier@canada.ca, 613-853-6369

10. Checklist for Chairing Bilingual Meetings

The School has designed an official languages job aid in the form of a checklist for chairing bilingual meetings. Employees interested in using it will find it in poster form in all the meeting rooms and online on the Official Languages page of the School's intranet.

Robert.Beaumier@canada.ca, 613-853-6369

11. Language of Communication between Regions

The Canada School of Public Service (the School) developed a simplified infographic called Language of Communication between Regions. The infographic's purpose is to assist employees in choosing the appropriate official language for communication with regions and with people who have diverse linguistic designations.

Robert.Beaumier@canada.ca, 613-853-6369

12. Vox Pop on the Culture of Bilingualism

As part of Linguistic Duality Day, the School released a video on the culture of bilingualism at the School. This speaker's corner was conducted during National Public Service Week and features employees who share their experiences and thoughts on what working in a bilingual environment means to them.

Robert.Beaumier@canada.ca, 613-853-6369

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

13. Language of Work Video

The CFIA has developed a Language of Work video to ensure that all employees and managers are aware of their obligations when communicating with each other as public servants in bilingual and unilingual regions as well as when delivering internal services.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

14. Tent Card for Boardrooms

The CFIA provides a tent card that is displayed in every boardroom in the National Capital Region and designated bilingual sites across Canada. It serves as a reminder of how to chair bilingual meetings.

Rachelle.Raymond@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-5294

Canadian Heritage

15. Bilingual Meeting Poster

This poster has been displayed in all conference rooms in designated bilingual regions to offer practical tips for chairs of meetings and participants in order to create an environment conducive to the use of both official languages.

Karine.Andraos@canada.ca, 819-778-0227

16. Guidelines on Language of Work in the Department of Canadian Heritage

The guidelines serve to establish the difference between the use of both official languages in bilingual regions and in unilingual regions and to clarify a number of points concerning the language of work.

Karine.Andraos@canada.ca, 819-778-0227

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)

17. Official Languages and You! Personnel Guide

The CRTC has prepared an employee guide entitled Official Languages and You! The guide is about 20 pages long and provides an overview of the Official Languages Act in plain language to facilitate reader comprehension, allowing employees and managers to familiarize themselves with their rights and responsibilities as federal public servants. It provides information on the recourse available to employees, the responsibilities of each CRTC sector, and suggestions for holding bilingual meetings.

Veronique.Geoffroy@crtc.gc.ca, 819-639-3896

Correctional Service Canada (CSC)

18. Chairing Bilingual Meetings Poster

This poster, designed to be displayed in boardrooms, provides tips on chairing meetings in both official languages.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

19. Right to Communicate in the Language of Choice Poster

This poster aims to foster employees' awareness of their right to communicate in their official language of choice in designated bilingual regions.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

20. Tent Card for Boardrooms

This tent card is displayed in boardrooms at sites designated bilingual for work purposes. It is a reminder of what to take into consideration when setting up meetings at designated bilingual sites.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

21. Tool on Language of Work in Bilingual and Unilingual Regions

As CSC has operational units in several regions of the country, the language of work tool was developed to provide employees and managers with information on their rights and obligations, whether they work in bilingual regions or in unilingual regions.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

22. DARE! OSEZ! Brochure

This brochure provides managers with key messages about official languages and includes a questionnaire that managers can use to begin a dialogue on this topic with their employees. It also comes with a DVD of the DARE! OSEZ! video.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-668-9617

Department of National Defence

23. Holding Bilingual Meetings Poster and Brochure

These two items promote bilingual conversations during meetings. They inform employees of their right to speak in either official language at meetings. They also provide tips on favouring the coexistence of both official languages and advice on how to properly chair bilingual meetings.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-901-8881

24. Toolkit for Bilingual Organizations and Units

A promotional toolkit to bring awareness was developed for bilingual organizations and units within the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. This kit contains tools such as a brochure entitled Bilingual Organizations and Units - What you need to know!, a printable promotional poster, a self-assessment tool (published by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages), a tent card and brochure on holding bilingual meetings, two presentations on the rights and responsibilities of civilian employees and military members located in BOUs, and generic articles to be customized in newspapers of bilingual regions.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-901-8881

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

25. Bilingualism Bonus Eligibility in Acting Appointment of Less Than Four Months

This reference document describes the eligibility criteria for receiving a bilingualism bonus in an acting appointment of less than four months.

Mélanie.Brassard@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-6925

26. Language of Work at a Glance

This one-pager was developed by ESDC to raise managers' awareness of their obligations pertaining to language of work.

Mélanie.Brassard@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-6925

27. Managers' Responsibilities for Language of Work in Unilingual Regions, Managers' Responsibilities for Language of Work in Bilingual Regions

These two explanatory documents were developed to raise managers' awareness of their obligations pertaining to language of work.

Mélanie.Brassard@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-6925

28. Official Languages Self-Assessment Guide for Managers—for Bilingual Regions for Language of Work Purposes / for Unilingual Regions for Language of Work Purposes

These two guides were developed to support managers in assessing the performance of their organization or work unit in terms of its official languages responsibilities and, based on the results of this self-assessment, to take the necessary actions to correct or improve the situation.

Mélanie.Brassard@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-6925

29. Table Card for Bilingual Meetings

This table card encourages meeting attendees to use their official language of choice. Each attendee must feel perfectly free to participate, using his or her choice of either English or French or both at the same meeting.

Mélanie.Brassard@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-6925

30. Toolkit to Cease Payment of the Bilingualism Bonus

This toolkit was developed to help managers meet their official languages obligations and to manage bilingualism bonus cases in various situations.

Mélanie.Brassard@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-6925

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

31. Bilingual Meetings Poster

This poster outlines the six key elements of successful and efficient meetings in both official languages.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

32. Chart on Language of Work—Services Offered in Both Official Languages

This chart outlines the services that must be provided to employees in their official language of choice in designated bilingual regions, as well as the services that must be available in both official languages in unilingual regions.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

33. Chart on Official Languages in Communications Between Employees

This chart indicates which official language employees should use with their internal clients if they occupy a bilingual position in a designated bilingual region.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

34. Directive on Language of Work

The objective of this directive is to specify the rights and obligations of managers and employees with regard to the use of English and French at work to create and maintain a working environment that fosters the use of both official languages in designated bilingual regions for language-of-work purposes.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

35. Guide on Language of Work in Designated Bilingual Regions

This guide explains what needs to be done to create and maintain a work environment conducive to the use of both official languages to communicate with employees in designated bilingual regions, while allowing them to use the official language of their choice. This guide describes the rights and obligations of managers and employees in designated bilingual regions.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

36. Language of Work—It's your right! It's a question of respect! Brochure

This brochure uses a question and answer format to address various themes, such as supervision, work instruments, personal and central services, meetings and the role of senior management.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

37. Language of Work Poster

This poster has been displayed in all conference rooms in designated bilingual regions, to remind everyone of the importance of creating an environment conducive to the use of both official languages and to encourage employees to express themselves in their official language of choice.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

38. Official Languages in Unilingual Regions Brochure

This brochure describes the official languages rights and responsibilities of managers and employees working in unilingual regions.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

39. One-pager: Language of Work

This document is available to all managers and employees of Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada. It gives an overview of our obligations on language of work and includes the following categories: bilingual positions in designated bilingual regions, all positions in designated bilingual regions, and unilingual regions.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

40. Protocol for Managing Bilingual Meetings Checklist

This protocol consists of a checklist that helps managers hold bilingual meetings.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

41. Tent Card for Bilingual Meetings

The tent card has two objectives: the first one is to invite employees to use the official language of their choice during meetings in designated bilingual regions; and the second objective is to remind meeting chairs of their role to ensure that all participants understand what is being said in the second language; therefore, if needed, the president provides a summary of the discussion in the other official language.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

42. Managers' Self-Assessment Checklist on Language of Work

The Managers' Self-Assessment Checklist on Language of Work was developed to allow managers and supervisors to carry out a simple self-evaluation to help them understand their role and their language of work responsibilities, and to identify areas for improvement.

Contact: CIC-OL-LO@cic.gc.ca

43. Self-Assessment Checklist for Planning and Chairing Successful Bilingual Meetings

A Self-Assessment Checklist for Planning and Chairing Successful Bilingual Meetings was designed as a tool to guide meeting facilitators and all levels of management in planning and chairing successful meetings and events involving both English-speaking and French-speaking employees.

Contact: CIC-OL-LO@cic.gc.ca

44. Tent Card for Bilingual Meetings

IRCC has developed a tent card to encourage bilingual meetings. Made of solid plastic for durability, it measures 30.5 cm long by 12.7 cm high. It incorporates the official blue sign for bilingual services and there is a note that says "Bilingual meetings, everyone is free to speak in English or French". On one side, the English version is written first and French is second. On the other side, it's the French version first and English second so that it can be used in any boardroom in all regions designated as bilingual across Canada and respect the order of the official languages.

Contact: CIC-OL-LO@cic.gc.ca

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)

45. INAC's Official Languages Ambassadors' Network "You have the floor! / Vous avez la parole!" Counter Card

The "You have the floor! / Vous avez la parole!" counter card serves as a visual reminder for staff to speak in the official language of their choice during meetings. The cards will be placed on the tables of meeting rooms in regions designated as bilingual for language-of-work purposes.

Nelson.Ferguson@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca, 819-639-6874

Infrastructure Canada (INFC)

46. Effective Bilingual Meetings Poster

INFC created a poster providing tips on how to have effective bilingual meetings with suggestions, such as answering questions in the language of the question, encouraging participants to speak in their language of choice and having a bilingual agenda and reference materials. These posters are found in all boardrooms at INFC.

Melanie.Laflamme2@canada.ca, 613-941-3167

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED)

47. Apprentice Tool

The tool consists of an image with a note that employees may add to the top of e-mails when writing in their second official language in informal internal communications. Inserting this image at the top of e-mails aims to encourage employees to write in their second official language by reducing the fear of making mistakes, and to encourage recipients to be understanding of spelling mistakes and errors in word choices. This tool was created by Natural Resources Canada, who agreed to share it with us. It has been adapted to meet the needs of ISED.

Roda.Muse@canada.ca, 343-291-3049 or Samantha.Moonsammy@canada.ca, 613-762-2819

48. Tent Cards for Boardrooms

The Department has developed tent cards featuring the Department's logo and its official languages slogan, "Two Languages, One Voice." The tent cards have been distributed to all boardrooms to remind users that they are free to use the official language of their choice during meetings.

Roda.Muse@canada.ca, 343-291-3049 or Samantha.Moonsammy@canada.ca, 613-762-2819

Justice Canada

49. Bilingual Meetings Brochure

The Bilingual Meetings Brochure provides a list of best practices for chairing a bilingual meeting as well as participating in one.

Isabelle.MacDonald@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-1893

50. List of Best Practices: Creating a Bilingual Workplace

This one-page document provides a list of best practices for managers and supervisors involved in creating a work environment conducive to the use of both official languages.

Isabelle.MacDonald@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-1893

Library and Archives Canada (LAC)

51. Survey on Language of Work

LAC conducts an annual survey with all employees on the Language of Work. Answers provided enable LAC to understand the trends, progress and challenges in regards to the language of work at LAC. They also help in improving implementation of the Official Languages Act and in contributing to creating and maintaining a work environment conducive to the use of both official languages.

Claire.Lalonde@canada.ca, 613-797-3857

National Capital Commission (NCC)

52. Guide for Holding Effective Meetings

This guide is intended for meeting organizers and participants and will help them to hold bilingual meetings. The guide specifies that all meeting documents should be distributed in both official languages, greetings to internal meetings must be in both official languages and that employees have the right to use the official language of their choice.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, ext. 5277

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

53. "I'm writing in my second language" – Apprentice Tool

Natural Resources Canada's Official Languages Action Group has developed a tool to encourage employees to use their second language in written correspondence. The tool consists in an image of a logo modeled on the official languages logo and a slogan that may be added to the signature block, informing e-mail recipients that the sender is writing in his/her second official language. The purpose of the tool is to encourage employees to use their second official language to write to co-workers and reduce their fear of making mistakes, to encourage recipients to be forgiving of spelling errors and potential shifts in meaning by indicating to them visually that the author is not writing in his or her first official language, to allow employees to write in and practise their second official language on a daily basis, and to show respect for the recipient's first official language. This tool was presented at a Dragons' Den–type event during the 2015 Best Practices Forum on Official Languages and was adopted by a number of organizations.

Marie Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mariemadeleine.chourouba@canada.ca, 343-292-8455

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

54. An Online Self-Assessment Tool for Managers

As part of a study published in March 2011 entitled "Beyond Bilingual Meetings: Leadership Behaviours for Managers," the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages developed the Leadership Competencies Profile for Official Languages and an online self-assessment tool based on this profile for public service managers. With this tool, managers can evaluate themselves and work to improve their performance and ability to manage bilingual personnel. They can measure their progress, identify their strengths and determine areas for improvement. The tool can give managers a clear picture of their ability to create a workplace conducive to the use of both official languages. It can also be used during performance appraisals.

Diane.Allard@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4690

55. Effective Practices for Chairing Bilingual Meetings

In regions designated as bilingual for language of work purposes, employees have the right to work and be supervised in the official language of their choice. This includes meetings in which they participate. Participation of all employees can be optimized by using the Effective practices for chairing bilingual meetings guide and the Take action! tool. In addition, to illustrate the effective practices put forth in the guide, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages developed a video on holding bilingual meetings.

Danielle.Muise@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4686

Parks Canada

56. The Beavers' Den Official Languages Initiative

The Beavers' Den Official Languages Initiative challenged employees to pitch their best ideas on how to encourage and support bilingualism in the workplace and in operational activities. The Beavers' Den offered the participants the chance to win a grand prize in development funding. A total of four teams stepped up and presented their ideas to a specially created Beavers' Den featuring Parks Canada's Official Languages Co-Champions and other members of Parks Canada's senior management community. The recorded episodes presented employees with ideas for promoting bilingualism within the Agency's work environment. The event was held each week for a duration of five weeks and the videos were shared with Parks Canada employees.

Contact: LO-OL@pc.gc.ca

Privy Council Office (PCO)

57. Official Languages Awareness Guide for Event Planning

The purpose of this guide is to raise organizing committees' awareness of their language obligations during meetings, including interdepartmental meetings, training sessions, public consultations and special events at the Privy Council Office. It is also intended to remove systemic and psychological barriers that could prevent the use of both official languages during meetings and events.

Karen.McCallum@pco-bcp.gc.ca, 613-948-6678

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

58. Laminated Poster on Bilingual Meetings

This laminated poster outlines six key elements of successful and efficient meetings in both official languages.

Contact: Human Resources Administration Unit, HRAU-UARH@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca

59. Language Rights

A capsule was published in the PPSC Communiqué reminding employees who work in a bilingual region and who hold bilingual positions or positions where the use of French or English is needed of their right to receive instructions and be evaluated in the language of their choice. A second capsule reminded the presidents and presidents of meetings in the bilingual region of their obligations with regards bilingual meetings.

Contact: Human Resources Administration Unit, HRAU-UARH@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca

Public Safety Canada

60. Emergency Management Vocabulary

Public Safety Canada created the "Emergency Management Vocabulary," which features more than 200 terms and definitions frequently used in emergency management (EM). It is meant to facilitate collaboration and standardization of EM terminology across the federal government. The publication demonstrates Public Safety's work to promote a common and consistent approach to EM within the Government of Canada as part of its legislative responsibility under the Emergency Management Act, and offers a tangible example of how Public Safety is working to promote the use of both official languages in the EM field.

Stéphanie.Durand@canada.ca, 613-991-2799

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

61. Chairing Bilingual Meetings Quick Reference

This leaflet contains a checklist for successful bilingual meetings.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

62. Chairing Bilingual Meetings Tent Card

This bound tent card contains pages describing techniques on how to chair bilingual meetings.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

63. Checklist on Language of Work for Managers in Bilingual Regions

This checklist enables managers to communicate effectively in both official languages, to supervise their employees in the official language of their choice, to provide them with tools in the official language of their choice, and to encourage them to maintain their skills in the other official language.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

64. Communication Between Employees

This diagram printed on cardstock shows how to communicate with other regions.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

65. Non-Imperative Staffing: What to Do Before Starting the Process

This tool for managers explains what to do before starting a non-imperative staffing process.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

66. Poster—Bilingual Meeting

This poster reminds employees that they have the right to use their official language of choice during meetings.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

67. Post-Language Training Tool

This tool for managers helps them support employees returning from language training.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

68. Who Chooses the Language of Supervision? Leaflet

This leaflet explains the role of supervisors in regions designated bilingual.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

69. Bilingual E-mail Templates

Every year, as the vacation season approaches, the RCMP's Directorate of Diversity and Official Languages provides employees with bilingual "Out of Office" templates. In addition to these templates, examples of common e-mails and of corporate holiday wishes are also available to employees. These message templates were created to enable employees to easily fulfill their official languages obligations in their day-to-day communications.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

70. Reference Tools on the Language of Communication in the Workplace

These quick reference tools help employees determine which language to use when communicating with other federal employees. The individual and institutional responsibilities with regard to Part V of the Official Languages Act are illustrated in the following four tools/tables: Communications Between Employees—Individual Responsibilities, Services to Employees—Linguistic Rights of Employees, Communications Between Regions—Institutional Responsibilities and Websites—Institutional Responsibilities.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Shared Services Canada (SSC)

71. Virtual Management Toolkit

Like a growing number of federal public service organizations, SSC uses new technologies to overcome distance. SSC's employees are spread out over 380 locations in more than 80 different cities across Canada. Many of them are managed virtually by supervisors who are not located on-site. To fully leverage each employee's talents in virtual management situations, SSC has developed a toolkit, which the Department has posted on its Intranet. An important element of this approach is the handling of language of work rights, which the toolkit explicitly deals with.

Yannick.Dallaire@canada.ca, 613-617-7411

Statistics Canada

72. Bilingual E-mail Templates

These general-use bilingual e-mail templates for absences, meeting invitations, retirements and so on promote internal bilingual communications.

Jean.Duval@canada.ca, 613-404-2402

73. Bilingual Meeting Workshops

These workshops on holding a bilingual meeting and the associated challenges include a rather original in-house video aimed at engaging the participants. In the discussions that follow, the participants learn best practices and are encouraged to apply them.

Jean.Duval@canada.ca, 613-404-2402

74. Policy and Table on Staffing Supervisory Positions

Statistics Canada has adopted a policy on staffing supervisory positions in regions designated bilingual for language of work. All director and higher-level positions as well as assistant director and section chief positions with supervisory duties must be staffed at the CBC level or higher. Unit head, team leader and all other supervisory positions must be staffed at the BBB level or higher. To help managers determine the linguistic profile when creating or reviewing a position, the Official Languages Policy Unit has developed a table that clearly outlines the levels at which supervisory positions must be staffed.

Jean.Duval@canada.ca, 613-404-2402

Translation Bureau

75. Templates of Telephone Greetings, Voice Mail Messages and E-mail Messages

The Bureau's Directive on Standardization of Telephone Greetings, Voice Mail Messages and E-mail Messages provides various groups of Bureau employees (language professionals, managers, etc.) with bilingual templates created to enable everyone to easily fulfill their official languages obligations in their day-to-day communications.

Contact: Bureaudelatraduction.TranslationBureau@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

76. Bilingual Meetings

At TBS, weekly Executive Committee (EXCO) meetings alternate between the two official languages, and sectors are encouraged to follow the example.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

77. Bilingual Out-of-Office Messages

Before the summer and holiday period, a reminder is sent to all employees to remember official languages when preparing their out-of-office e-mail and telephone messages. A series of bilingual messages is posted on the Secretariat's infosite to help employees draft their own out-of-office messages.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

78. CBC Strategy for Senior Level Feeder Groups

The CBC Strategy for Senior Level Feeder Groups (with supervisory functions) was put in place to continue to promote a work environment conducive to the use of both official languages. Its objective is to ensure that employees in subordinate positions can work in the official language of their choice. Employees in senior level feeder groups with no supervision can also take language training to the CBC level in preparation for advancement to the executive levels.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

79. Communications Between Regions Diagram

This document contains a diagram that illustrates communications between employees of federal institutions as well as between those employees and central and common services agencies. It also covers communications between federal institutions and their own employees, outside of personal and central services or supervision, which are covered by the Directive on Official Languages for People Management. The diagram is available on the online platform used by the community of persons responsible for Official Languages in federal institutions.

Sharon.Ginsberg@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-266-6764

80. Departmental Survey on Language of Work

The TBS developed and conducted a departmental Survey on Language of Work. The objective of this tool was to measure employee satisfaction in this area. The results of the survey will be used to develop TBS's next departmental three-year Official Languages Action Plan by choosing appropriate activities for improvement where necessary.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Linguistic Profile of Positions

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

1. Determining Linguistic Requirements Form

Hiring managers complete this form, which is available on ACOA's intranet, to determine the language profile of a position. This document helps managers to reflect on the following key elements: delivery of services to the public, the status of the position, supervision of the position and delivery of internal services to employees in designated bilingual regions for language of work purposes.

Ginette.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-851-6508

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

2. Directive on Linguistic Identification of Positions

The CBSA is taking positive steps to increase the bilingual capacity of its supervisors in bilingual regions in order to create an environment conducive to the use of both official languages. The CBSA has updated its Directive on Linguistic Identification of Positions to include supervisory positions set at BBB/BBB or higher and EX minus one supervisory positions at CBC/CBC. These profiles are the new standard for CBSA supervisors in bilingual regions going forward. Supervisors who do not meet this standard will be granted specialized language training over the next two years.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development Agency for the Quebec Regions (CED)

3. Departmental Directive on Designating and Determining the Language Requirements of Positions

This directive explains linguistic profile obligations and the importance of completing the supplementary appendix and the profiler. The Linguistic Profiler is an online tool that helps Canadian Heritage managers make decisions to ensure that a position's linguistic profile is accurate. The guide provides managers with important facts that will help determine the language designation of a position. The document is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

Canadian Heritage

4. Manager's Guide

This guide provides managers with important elements that help determine the language designation of a position.

Contact: Classification Administration Officer, 819-953-5085

Correctional Service Canada (CSC)

5. Official Languages and Human Resources Activities

The Correctional Service of Canada's tool entitled Official Languages and Human Resources Activities provides human resources advisors and managers with an overview of official languages requirements as they apply to human resource management. Its purpose is to ensure that the language requirements of positions in various staffing actions are established in accordance with the Official Languages Act (OLA) and the Qualification Standards in relation to Official Languages.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

6. Chart: Determining the Linguistic Components of an Organization

This chart was developed to help managers identify the factors they must consider when determining the language requirements of positions, establish the linguistic profile of a bilingual position or determine the minimum number of bilingual positions required in their area of responsibility, and thus confirm their bilingual capacity in terms of services to the public and central services.

Mélanie.Brassard@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-6925

7. Guidelines on Identifying Language Requirements of Positions

These guidelines, as well as a presentation and questions and answers, were developed to describe the steps managers must take to ensure that language requirements are established for all positions in ESDC and that all positions are staffed in compliance with the Official Languages Act and the Public Service Employment Act.

Mélanie.Brassard@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-6925

8. Standard Linguistic Profile for Employees Delivering Services to Canadians in bilingual Service Canada Centres

In 2013, Service Canada approved a standard linguistic profile of CBC for employees who deliver services to Canadians in bilingual Service Canada Centres. The standardization of the profile will strengthen the quality of service delivery in the minority language and reinforce consistency across the country. A phased-implementation is being undertaken to ensure sustainability of bilingual service delivery while supporting employees who require additional training to meet the new language profile.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

9. Directive on the Linguistic Identification of Positions

The objective of this directive is to guide sub-delegated managers in objectively determining the positions' linguistic identification based on the functions and duties of the positions.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

10. Incumbent's Options Form

This form sets out the incumbent's options following a change to the language requirements and/or linguistic profile of his or her position. It must be signed by the employee and the responsible manager once the employee has chosen an option.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

11. Letter: Change from Bilingual to Unilingual Language Requirements

This letter is used to inform employees that the language requirements of their position have been changed from bilingual to unilingual.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

12. Letter: Change from Unilingual to Bilingual Language Requirements—Employee Does Not Meet Requirements

This letter is used to inform employees that the language requirements of their position have been changed from unilingual to bilingual and that they do not meet the new language requirements.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

13. Letter: Change from Unilingual to Bilingual Language Requirements—Employee Meets Requirements

This letter is used to inform employees that the language requirements of their position have been changed from unilingual to bilingual and that they meet the new language requirements.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

14. Letter: Change Made to the Linguistic Profile—Employee Does Not Meet Requirements

This letter is used to inform employees that the linguistic profile of their position has been changed and that they do not meet the new linguistic profile.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

15. Letter: Change Made to the Linguistic Profile—Employee Meets Requirements

This letter is used to inform employees that the linguistic profile of their position has been changed and that they meet the new linguistic profile.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

16. Linguistic Identification of Positions Module

This module ensures that the language requirements of all positions at Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada are set objectively and fulfill the Department's linguistic obligations to the public and to employees.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

17. Directive on the Linguistic Identification of Positions

This directive aims to ensure that the linguistic designation of positions is established appropriately and aligned with statutory obligations under the Official Languages Act and the Treasury Board's policies and directives.

Contact: CIC-OL-LO@cic.gc.ca

18. Interactive Tool for Determining the Official Language of Supervision

This tool is an interactive window in which simple questions are asked: where is the employee located, what is the linguistic profile of his/her position, where is the manager located, what is the linguistic profile of his/her position? The user simply makes a selection in the drop-down menu and the answer is provided automatically.

Contact: CIC-OL-LO@cic.gc.ca

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (INFC)

19. Guidelines on Language Requirements of Positions and Staffing of Bilingual Positions

ISED has developed Guidelines on Language Requirements of Positions and Staffing of Bilingual Positions to ensure that language requirements for all positions are established and that positions are staffed in compliance with the Official Languages Act and the Public Service Employment Act, to fulfill the organization's official languages obligations to the public and to its employees. These Guidelines are consistent with the official languages policies and directives of the Treasury Board of Canada.

Dominique.Jolicoeur@canada.ca, 343-291-3150

Justice Canada

20. Directive on Language Requirements of Positions and Staffing of Bilingual Positions

The Departmental Directive on Language Requirements of Positions and Staffing of Bilingual Positions was developed to ensure that the language requirements of all departmental positions are established in a consistent and objective manner, and that positions are staffed in compliance with the Official Languages Act and the Public Service Employment Act, thus enabling the organization to fulfill its official language obligations to the public and to its employees.

Isabelle.MacDonald@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-1893

21. Form: Language Requirements of the Position

This form serves to facilitate the linguistic identification process, in compliance with the departmental Directive on Language Requirements of Positions and Staffing of Bilingual Positions. Managers must complete and submit this form when requesting the creation of a new position and when requesting the modification to the language requirements of an existing position.

Isabelle.MacDonald@justice.gc.ca, 613-941-1893

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

22. How to Objectively Determine the Language Requirements and Linguistic Profiles of Positions

This tool consists of a detailed questionnaire that helps managers easily and objectively determine the language requirements and linguistic profiles of positions.

Marie Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mariemadeleine.chourouba@canada.ca, 343-292-8455

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

23. Reference Guide and Form: Linguistic Review of a Position

This guide and form are tools that enable managers to assess the language obligations associated with a position. These obligations reflect the duties of the employees or their work units, as well as language obligations with respect to services to the public and language of work.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

24. Guide for the Linguistic Identification of Positions

This guide is an instructional tool that helps managers as well as human resources and official languages specialists accurately identify the linguistic requirements of all positions within each work unit at every hierarchical level in order to ensure adequate bilingual capacity throughout the RCMP.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Shared Services Canada (SSC)

25. Analysis Grid—Determining Language Requirements of Positions and Staffing of Bilingual Positions

This tool helps managers to objectively determine the language requirements of positions, based on the functions, and ensure that the linguistic obligations with respect to service to the public and language of work, as well as obligations regarding communications with other government departments, are met and reflect the principle of equal status of the two official languages in exercising the functions of the position.

Contact: SSC.OL-LO.SPC@canada.ca

26. Decision Tree and Supporting Scenarios to Assist in Determining the Language Requirements of Supervisory Positions

To assist Management and Human Resources Advisors with the application of article 6.1.2 of the Directive of Official Languages for People Management, the Official Languages Unit of SSC has developed a short document including scenarios and chart in the form of a decision tree. It is intended to assist the Sub-Delegated Managers to determine the language required for the supervision.

Contact: SSC.OL-LO.SPC@canada.ca

27. HR Management Guide to Determine the Linguistic Profiles of Positions

This reference guide was specifically developed for the Sub-Delegated Managers and Human Resources Advisors. The document equips Human Resources Advisors with the necessary information to help management in understanding the importance of objectively establishing the linguistic profile of the positions, the roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders, as well as the key elements to be considered during this exercise.

Contact: SSC.OL-LO.SPC@canada.ca

28. Strategy and Process for the Review of Position Language Requirements

Given the context of SSC, a plan and process to review the language requirements of all the positions within the Department was developed and adopted. This initiative is part of SSC's official language action plan and serves to ensure that the linguistic profiles are established objectively, according to the functions of the positions. This strategy and process can be used by any federal organization.

Contact: SSC.OL-LO.SPC@canada.ca

29. Strategy and Process to Implement Official Languages Requirements (i.e., Increasing Language Requirements for Supervisor/Management Positions in Bilingual Regions)

Following the Commissioner of Official Language's recommendation to make CBC/CBC the minimum language proficiency requirement for manager and supervisor positions in bilingual regions, SSC has developed a strategy and a departmental approach to raise the language requirements of these positions. This approach can be used for different analysis purposes and any review of the position requirements in federal organizations.

Contact: SSC.OL-LO.SPC@canada.ca

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

30. Determining the Linguistic Profile of Bilingual Positions: The ABCs of Linguistic Profiles at Your Fingertips

The ABCs of Linguistic Profiles at Your Fingertips is a tool designed to help managers, as well as human resources and official languages specialists, objectively and consistently identify the linguistic profiles of bilingual positions, while applying the Qualification Standards in Relation to Official Languages. It does not replace the standards, but rather helps users apply them. Users are asked to answer a series of questions on a bilingual position's duties that must be carried out in the second official language. By using the tool, managers establish a linguistic profile in a manner that meets Treasury Board's policy requirements. A printable final report presents the profile and the functions associated with a particular position. This report can also be saved as a PDF document. This tool was updated in June 2011.

Sharon.Ginsberg@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-266-6764

31. Information Sessions for Human Resources Advisors and Assistants (Staffing and Classification)

These information sessions, which are offered to human resources advisors and assistants, cover day-to-day official languages issues. Sessions include information on the process of determining language requirements of positions and the linguistic profile of bilingual positions, and coding to be entered into the human resources system with respect to official languages.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Official Languages Act – Rights and Obligations

Air Canada

1. Brochure on Air Canada's Language Obligations

This brochure explains the Official Languages Act and how it applies to our daily lives; the active offer of service and the importance of serving customers in the official language of their choice; and the procedure to follow when that is not possible. The brochure is distributed to all new-front line employees during the official languages presentation, and is also available on the intranet site.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

2. Online Orientation Kit for New Employees

A presentation on Air Canada's official languages obligations is included in the employee orientation kit, which is available online.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

3. Official Languages Policy

This integrated policy establishes respect for the linguistic rights of the public ACOA serves as a core value at the Agency and reaffirms ACOA's duty under the Official Languages Act to serve the public in their official language of choice. The policy also reflects ACOA's approach to official languages whereby the commitment to serve the public in their official language of choice is complemented by an undertaking to consider the needs and realities of the official language minority communities in program development and delivery.

Gerry.Morrissey@canada.ca, 506-378-1179

Canada Economic Development Agency for the Quebec Regions (CED)

4. Brochure: Linguistic Rights and Responsibilities

This brochure was initially prepared by Public Services and Procurement Canada. Tailored to the Agency, it informs employees and managers of their rights and responsibilities in terms of language of work. The document is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

5. Online Training on Official Languages

This online training was developed to inform employees of their rights and obligations concerning Parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)

6. Linguistic Duality at Work for You: Your Guide to Official Languages at CMHC

This guide, available on CMHC's intranet, provides CMHC employees with a reference tool on official languages. The Guide provides an overview of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act, and covers key aspects of the administration of official languages at CMHC, including staffing, language testing and training. It also provides employees with information on their rights and responsibilities and contains a frequently asked questions (FAQs) section.

Roxanne Gallagher, rgallagh@cmhc-schl.gc.ca, 613-748-4516

Canada School of Public Service

7. Self-assessment Tool for Official Languages Best Practices

This self-assessment tool is an instrument to help employees reflect on their official languages responsibilities. The tool also provides clear examples of best practices that can be adopted in order to cultivate linguistic duality at work. The annexes and references found in the tool help readers refresh or expand on their knowledge of aspects of the Official Languages Act. A version of the tool has also been adapted for all public servants. This version is available through the School's GCcampus catalogue.

Robert.Beaumier@canada.ca, 613-853-6369

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA)

8. Policy on Official Languages

This policy outlines CATSA's obligations under parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act and confirms CATSA's commitment to developing programs and procedures that enhance compliance with its requirements under the Act.

Rhoda.Boyd@catsa-acsta.gc.ca, 613-949-6463

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

9. Employee's Guide to Official Languages

An Employee's Guide to Official Languages at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency outlines how the Agency is meeting its legislative obligations regarding official languages. This guide allows employees – regardless of their first official language – to quickly understand the different parts of the Act that the Agency is subject to.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

10. Online Course: Official Languages at the CFIA

This interactive, self-directed online course is designed to increase CFIA employees' and managers' awareness and knowledge of the CFIA's Official Languages Program, particularly with respect to employees' rights and responsibilities, managers' responsibilities, and the importance of providing services to members of the public in the official language of their choice, including the active offer of service. This course comes courtesy of the Canada Revenue Agency and has been adapted to reflect the CFIA's obligations and practices.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

11. Official Languages Act Video: What does it mean for you?

This three-minute video is the second in a series of videos designed to inform Department employees about their obligations under the Act. What does it mean for you? addresses misconceptions about the Act and encourages the audience to learn more about the Act and what it means for them as federal government employees. This video, which is available on GCpedia, supports the official languages coordinators in fulfilling their role in raising awareness of official languages.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

12. Official Languages Models

Three models were developed: one for communications and services, one for language of work and another for official languages ​​and supervision. These models are in the form of a wheel whose centre is the reason for the model. The next two layers summarize the obligations, rights and things to remember for each theme. These models, specifically the one for management, can be brought to management discussion tables and serve as bases for reflection. They allow all employees at all levels to see and understand what is expected of them and the key points to consider for each theme. An explanatory document comes with each model.

Contact: CIC-OL-LO@cic.gc.ca

13. Presentation on Managers' Official Languages Obligations

The Human Resources official languages team developed a one-hour bilingual presentation to improve the understanding of manager's obligations regarding official languages. The presentation focuses on language of work, language of supervision, communications between regions, language of written communications, language of meetings, working groups, service to the public or central and personal services to employees, and precedence order for language rights.

Contact: CIC-OL-LO@cic.gc.ca

Infrastructure Canada (INFC)

14. Official Languages Obligations

This document outlines the obligations of INFC pursuant to parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act. It is posted in both official languages on the Department's internal website for all employees.

Melanie.Laflamme2@canada.ca, 613-941-3167

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED)

15. Official Languages Filter

The Official Languages filter questionnaire includes a series of questions to make it easier to assess various components of the Official Languages Act and review the official languages obligations that the Department must meet in preparing Treasury Board submissions, policies or programs.

Linda.Garand@canada.ca, 613-889-7996

16. Official Languages Policy

The purpose of this policy is to foster an enabling culture within the Department with respect to the attainment of official languages objectives by committing to offer services of equal quality to the public regardless of the method of communication. We also commit to taking the necessary steps to respect the principle of linguistic equality within the Department and recognize the needs and specific realities of official language minorities regarding programs and community development.

Dominique.Jolicoeur@canada.ca, 343-291-3150

17. Orientation Sessions for New Employees

ISED holds quarterly orientation sessions for new employees, during which employees are made aware of their obligations and rights with respect to official languages.

Dominique.Jolicoeur@canada.ca, 343-291-3150

Justice Canada

18. Annotated Federal Language Laws in Canada

This e-book, available on Justipedia, contains all federal legislation relating, in whole or in part, to the use of language within government institutions and in private activities. For each of these laws, the book reproduces the relevant case law excerpts and references. It is regularly updated by the Official Languages Directorate —Law Team. It is an excellent tool to enable jurists and non-jurists to achieve a better understanding of the legal principles applicable to language issues in Canada.

Note: In July 2017, the Annotated Language Laws of Canada will be published on Justipedia, the Open Government Portal and CanLII as part of Justice Canada's contributions to the Canada 150 celebration. This publication will be made available to the public for free, and will cover all constitutional, federal, provincial and territorial language laws. The publication will also incorporate case law excerpts that interpret these language provisions.

Michel.Francoeur@justice.gc.ca, 613-957-4967

19. Charter Checklist

The Charter Checklist (sections 16 to 23) is prepared by the Official Languages Directorate — Law Team of the Department of Justice. The checklists, available on the intranet of Justice Canada, are designed to assist legal advisors whose practice may not involve extensive experience with the Charter. The checklists describe the content of each of the provisions, set out its purpose and provide a list of decisions pertaining to those specific provisions. They are regularly updated.

Michel.Francoeur@justice.gc.ca, 613-957-4967

20. Language Litigation Summary

The Summary of Language Litigation, available on Justipedia, contains a complete summary of all language rights cases currently before the courts in Canada, whether these cases involve the Attorney General Canada or not. This document allows those interested in language rights to follow the evolution of litigation in this sensitive area and to be informed on a regular basis of the latest case developments. It therefore constitutes a privileged communication, information, surveillance and risk management tool.

Michel.Francoeur@justice.gc.ca, 613-957-4967

21. Official Languages Act—A Summary

This document provides a general explanation of the various parts of the Official Languages Act.

Michel.Francoeur@justice.gc.ca, 613-957-4967

22. Official Languages Legal Awareness Program

This detailed PowerPoint presentation provides useful information on the purpose, nature and implementation of constitutional official languages rights and of the Official Languages Act.

Michel.Francoeur@justice.gc.ca, 613-957-4967

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

23. "Language Rights 2009-2011"

This report summarizes and analyzes court decisions on language rights in 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. While not exhaustive, it is intended as a reference tool for people interested in the judicial interpretation of these rights.

Pascale.Giguere@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4869

24. Overview of the Official Languages Act

This overview of the key sections of the Act includes details on service to the public, language of work and promotion of English and French.

Antonia.Papadakou@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4702

Parks Canada

25. Checklist – Official Languages Obligations When Contracting Out Services

The Checklist on Official Languages Obligations when contracting out services is mandatory for all new third-party agreements. It was created to support managers in ensuring that official languages obligations are met in regard to contracting services. This checklist is a new element that has been added to the contracting guide and published on the Parks Canada Intranet. Examples of official languages clauses have been added and are also to be included in agreements that are being renewed. The aim is to focus on delivering services of equal quality in both official languages. The checklist must be printed, completed and added to the contracting or other appropriate file for reference and audit purposes. This allows Parks Canada to monitor implementation and progress.

Contact: LO-OL@pc.gc.ca

26. Official Languages Overview Flow Chart

The Flow Chart supports Parks Canada in its leadership role in the management of its official languages program. It underlines the purpose of the Official Language Act (OLA) and defines Parks Canada's obligations, roles and responsibilities, and main corporate official languages priorities to comply with the OLA requirements.

Contact: LO-OL@pc.gc.ca

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

27. Linguistic Obligations When Attending Internal or Public Events

A table outlining employees' linguistic obligations when attending internal or public events was posted on the PPSC intranet site and communication to all employees.

Contact: Human Resources Administration Unit, HRAU-UARH@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca

28. Overview of the Official Languages Act Paper Cube

This paper cube summarizes parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Act.

Contact: Human Resources Administration Unit, HRAU-UARH@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

29. Official Languages Monitoring Framework

The Official Languages ​​Monitoring Framework was developed to help all sectors of the Department to comply with its obligations regarding official languages, particularly regarding service delivery and language of work. The framework has two distinct components: 1) the Observations Exercise for the Availability of Bilingual Service, which aims to measure the level of availability of bilingual service to the Public, to PSPC employees and those of federal institutions located in bilingual regions, in both official languages ​​including the active offer of service; and 2) the Monitoring Exercise for the Language Requirements of Positions, which aims to measure the level of alignment between the work descriptions and language requirements (linguistic profiles and communications requirements) and statements of merit criteria for a sample of positions that have been the subject of a selection process. The results are presented to the Official Languages ​​Governance Committee and senior management of the Department and serve among others to establish the main strategies and guide the actions of the Department.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

30. Official Languages Kits

As part of its awareness campaign entitled "Our Heritage, Our Advantage," the RCMP's Directorate of Diversity and Official Languages has developed kits containing many tools designed to inform employees about their official languages rights and obligations. The kits are distributed through the internal employee orientation program, at presentations and during awareness activities.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

31. Official Languages Reference Guide

The Official Languages Reference Guide is a tool developed by the RCMP's Directorate of Diversity and Official Languages to help employees understand and exercise their official languages rights and obligations under the Official Languages Act, the Regulations, and related policies and directives.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

32. A Description of Official Languages (Communications with and Services to the Public) Regulations

Written for a broad audience, this document presents the Regulations in some detail, so that readers gain a general understanding of their content. Pursuant to section 32 of the Official Languages Act, the Regulations define what constitutes "significant demand" and "nature of office," as referred to in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Act, and spell out the circumstances under which members of the public can communicate with federal institutions and receive services in the official language of their choice.

Carsten.Quell@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-957-1034

33. BUROLIS

BUROLIS is the Government of Canada's publicly accessible database that identifies federal organizations' official languages obligations under the Official Languages (Communications with and Services to the Public) Regulations. This database lists the offices of the departments and agencies subject to the Regulations as well as those required to provide communications and services in both official languages under the Official Languages Act.

Carsten.Quell@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-957-1034

34. FAQ on Official Languages Information System II

The TBS's Official Languages Centre of Excellence (OLCE) has developed "frequently asked questions" on the Official Languages Information System II (OLIS II) to help all institutions not part of the core public administration complete their OLIS II tables. The OLCE has also posted the OLIS II guide, in both English and French, on the online platform used by the community of persons responsible for official languages in federal institutions.

Chantal.Terrien@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-410-1431

35. Official Languages Policies Web Page

This web page presents all current Treasury Board's official languages policies. It includes a link to other Treasury Board policies related to official languages, such as the Policy on Communications and Federal Identity, and a link to relevant legislation.

Sharon.Ginsberg@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-266-6764

36. President of the Treasury Board's Annual Report on Official Languages

In accordance with Part VIII of the Official Languages Act, the President of the Treasury Board has the mandate to table an annual report to Parliament on the status of official languages programs in the various federal departments and agencies for which he is responsible. This annual report covers the application of parts IV, V and VI of the Act. A poster synthetizing some elements of the report is available on the platform used by the persons responsible for official languages in federal institutions.

Chantal.Terrien@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-410-1431

Planning, Promotional and Information Tools

Air Canada

1. Banner Pens

Banner pens with an active offer and contact information reminder are distributed to employees at training, on-boarding sessions and other events.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

2. "Linguistics" Tab on Intranet Site

A "Linguistics" tab is available on the employee intranet home page to offer greater visibility of and better accessibility to anything relating to the language policy as well as linguistic services, such as training, translation and tests. The language policy section includes the presentation given to new employees, the roles and responsibilities of official languages champions, audit reports, and promotional messages, such as the one given on Linguistic Duality Day.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

3. Presentation to New Employees

A presentation to new employees is given during initial training. It explains company obligations, customer expectations of staff, and the tools and services available to help the staff do their jobs.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

4. Publication on Official Languages

This publication includes information on Air Canada's official languages policy and procedures, roles and responsibilities, recruitment, contacts, language level requirements by function, signage, the active offer of service and language training options.

Chantal.Dugas@aircanada.ca, 514-422-2672 or Marie-France.Roy@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6362

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

5. ACOA's Official Languages Action Plan

An integrated action plan (Parts IV, V, VI and VII) has been developed to achieve and further enhance the organization's values, practices and overall culture to reflect the linguistic duality of Canadian society.

Ginette.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-851-6508 or Nicole.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-380-5043

6. Official Languages Management Committee

This committee provides overall guidance and leadership in terms of official languages and ensures linkage with the Executive Committee. It also ensures the link between of official languages champion, the Finance and Corporate Services and the Policy and Programs directorates' responsibilities related to official languages. It is chaired by the Agency's official languages champion. A Legal Services representative is invited to attend meetings to provide advice, as needed.

Ginette.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-851-6508

Canada Economic Development Agency for the Quebec Regions (CED)

7. Departmental Official Languages Committee

The Agency's Departmental Official Languages Committee ensures that a coordinated approach is taken to implementing parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act. The Committee is made up of the official languages champion, the official languages program coordinator, the Part VII coordinator, two representatives from the Policy and Communications sector and a legal services representative.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

8. Presentations for New Employees

These presentations are available on the Agency's intranet page for new employees. It gives them an overview of parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

Canada School of Public Service

9. Award from the Official Languages Champion

In 2015 and 2016, the School recognized exceptional efforts and achievements in bilingualism by offering an award to an individual or team that made an exemplary contribution to linguistic duality in their workplace. The winner was picked by a Selection Board and received an award as well as a certificate of recognition signed by the Champion of Official Languages.

Robert.Beaumier@canada.ca, 613-853-6369

Canada School of Public Service, Canadian Heritage and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

10. OL-Pardy! Quiz

This quiz has questions on parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act. It is in PowerPoint format and is available in three versions: English, French and bilingual.

Sarah.Boily@canada.ca, 819-934-9195

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA)

11. Procedure on Official Languages for Employees

This procedure provides the Human Resources Branch with instructions on how to manage official languages in the following areas: identification of language requirements, staffing, post-appointment, second language training, records and reporting.

Rhoda.Boyd@catsa-acsta.gc.ca, 613-949-6463

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

12. Creation of an Official Languages Awards Category

The CFIA created an Official Languages category for the annual President's National Awards. This award recognizes outstanding contributions in the promotion of both official languages either by an individual CFIA employee or by a group of employees.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

13. Creation of an Official Languages Committee and Annual Action Plan

The CFIA Quebec Area Office has an official languages committee mandated to implement an annual action plan for service to the public, language of work, equitable representation of language groups and advancement of English and French.

Sylvie.Brisebois@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815, ext. 4225

14. Manager's Guide to Delivering Services in Both Official Languages

This guide provides managers of bilingual offices with information on how to ensure they have competent and efficient teams providing services to English-speaking and French-speaking clients. The guide includes information on establishing the language profiles of positions, recruiting qualified bilingual employees, language training and setting up a bilingual office, as well as a self-evaluation checklist.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

15. Official Languages Information Capsules

These information capsules on the Agency's various official languages directives are e-mailed periodically to all employees. They remind employees of their obligations with respect to language of work and bilingual services to the public, they give practical advice on e-mail signature blocks, voice mailbox messages, automated e-mail absence messages, and so on, and provide information on useful websites, such as the Language Portal of Canada, TERMIUM Plus® and the Translation Bureau's site.

Sylvie.Brisebois@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815, ext. 4225

16. Official Languages Network and Action Plan

The CFIA has an official languages committee, called the Official Languages Network, which drafts an action plan outlining events to promote official languages in a given fiscal year.

Robert.Charlebois@inspection.gc.ca, 450-768-1417

17. Renowned Speakers for the Promotion of Official Languages

The CFIA uses internationally renowned speakers to promote the advancement and awareness of official languages among its staff. For the International Day of La Francophonie, the CFIA welcomed novelist and playwright Antonine Maillet in 2015 and writer and member of the French Academy Dany Laferrière in 2016, in collaboration with the Canada School of Public Service. Without a doubt, speakers of this calibre are thought-provoking and refreshing, and attract the attention and participation of many employees.

Sylvie.Brisebois@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815, ext. 4225

18. The CFIA's Official Language Centre

The CFIA's Official Languages Centre (OLC) acts as a centralized hub covering three units: official languages policy and engagement, L'Arrêt-One Stop, and Second Language Evaluation (SLE). As part of the policy and engagement initiative, the OLC team addresses complaints in-house and promotes the use of both official languages through vehicles such as the "Active Offer" video. L'Arrêt-One Stop offers a variety of resources and services including toolkits, advice on linguistic services suppliers, and official languages exam preparation.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

Canadian Heritage

19. 2015-2018 Official Languages Action Plan

This three-year action plan contains the commitments of the Department with regard to official languages.

Karine.Andraos@canada.ca, 819-778-0227

Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS)

20. Award Focusing on Linguistic Duality

The Diversity and Linguistic Duality award was created to recognize and reward exemplary contributions by employees who visibly and actively promote workforce inclusiveness and respect for the active use of both official languages.

Laura A., LOEOLE@smtp.gc.ca, 613-369-2959

21. Communication Strategy and Official Languages Microsite

To promote a much broader awareness of official languages, we have developed a communication strategy. The objectives of this plan are to encourage employees to acquire a second official language, to provide concrete tactics to support maintenance of a second language, and to promote a sense of personal pride in being or becoming bilingual. As a result, a bilingual Official Languages microsite has been launched on our intranet in September 2016. This tool features existing links, FAQs and quarterly official languages bulletins aimed at providing employees with tips and raising awareness of the benefits of linguistic duality in the workplace. It consists of visual imagery, taglines/products, a note board where employees can provide their feedback and ideas and many other features, all part of an effort to change the perception that learning a second language is a journey, not a destination.

Laura A., LOEOLE@smtp.gc.ca, 613-369-2959

22. Official Languages Day

CSIS celebrates its linguistic duality by holding an Official Languages Day every year, and has done so since 2010. A number of activities are organized to celebrate and promote linguistic duality, such as notable guest speakers and fun games (Wheel of Official Languages, Charivari, Jeopardy, dictation by our official languages champion, crosswords, etc.). Employees have an opportunity to meet the official languages team at the kiosks, where they can also obtain information on second language learning and maintenance tools, Second Language Evaluation (SLE) testing, commonly used expressions that cannot be translated word for word, etc. In addition, Public Services and Procurement Canada representatives were invited to host a kiosk, which allowed our employees to learn more on the tools available through the Translation Bureau (e.g. TERMIUM Plus®, the Language Portal of Canada website).

Laura A., LOEOLE@smtp.gc.ca, 613-369-2959

Correctional Service Canada (CSC)

23. Official Languages Overview for Induction Training

This online presentation familiarizes CSC employees and managers with the basic principles of the Official Languages Act, its Regulations and related policies, and the promotion of linguistic duality in federal institutions. In addition to raising awareness among employees and managers, the presentation contains interactive quizzes and responses that enable them to verify what they have learned. 

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

24. Blueprint 2020 and Official Languages

This report entitled "Leveraging Bilingualism in the Public Service of the Future" is the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions' contribution to the Blueprint 2020 exercise. This document outlines our response to the three questions posed in the Blueprint 2020 consultations, specifically what the Blueprint 2020 vision means for official languages in the Public Service; what changes, from the perspective of the use of English and French in the Public Service workplace, would have the greatest impact in making that vision a reality; and, what can the Network of official languages champions do to help achieve the Blueprint 2020 vision. An action plan with regard to the Blueprint 2020 engagement exercise has also been developed and submitted to the Clerk of the Privy Council. Status Reports on Official Languages were submitted to the Clerk in January 2015, December 2015 and December 2016. These reports are available under Official Languages Community in the Horizontal Communities and Networks section on the Blueprint 2020 GCpedia page and on the Council of the Network's website.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-668-9617

25. DARE! OSEZ! Video

This video is intended to promote linguistic duality as an individual and organizational value and to encourage the use of best practices by new recruits and all public service employees. Departments, agencies and Crown corporations are encouraged to use this video in their orientation sessions for new employees. It is available on DVD and online.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-668-9617

26. DARE! OSEZ! Website

This website includes tools developed by the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions to support the official languages champions. It outlines the roles and responsibilities of the champions and major official languages stakeholders.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-668-9617

27. Governance Checklist

In response to the inclusion of governance and the role assigned to champions in the Policy on Official Languages, which came into force in November 2012, the Council of the Network, in collaboration with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's Official Languages Centre of Excellence, has developed a governance checklist for deputy heads. This checklist will help them establish an appropriate governance structure within their institutions while taking into consideration their institution's size and mandate.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-668-9617

28. Linguistic Duality Day

The second Thursday of September has been designated Linguistic Duality Day throughout the public service. This annual celebration gives federal employees the opportunity to organize activities promoting official languages within their departments, agencies and Crown corporations.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-668-9617

29. Spotlight on the Top Best Practices on Official Languages Contest

The Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions launched the Spotlight on the Top Best Practices on Official Languages contest and gathered more than 150 innovative best practices in 2016. These valuable resources and tools have been inserted into this edition of the Collection of Official Languages Resources so that all institutions can use and adapt them to promote and advance the Official Languages Program in their workplace. Representatives from winning organizations are invited to present their tools and best practices at a Dragons' Den–style event which is held during the Best Practices Forum on Official Languages. Dragons and participants from departments, agencies and Crown corporations are encouraged to adopt the best practices within their own organizations. Many of the best practices highlighted during the Dragons' Den–style events have inspired the participants and have been adopted within organizations. The Council of the Network will continue to share tools and best practices with official languages champions.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-668-9617

30. Toolkit to Support Official Languages Champions

In January 2016, the Council of the Network launched a toolkit to support official languages champions. The kit includes tips, e-mails and bilingual articles to promote and encourage bilingualism in the workplace. The documents in the toolkit can be easily adapted to meet the specific needs of each organization. To accomplish this, we are leveraging existing tools and making them available across government. To date, four tools have been made available to the champions: 1) The Talk the Talk series involving linguistic expressions, 2) a tool to facilitate the setting up of language mentoring projects and programs, 3) a tool on setting up Second Language Days, and 4) an e-poster that provides employees with easy, one-stop access to a variety of links they can use to learn or maintain their second official language. These tools have been adopted by many organizations.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-668-9617

31. Vision 2017 - Strategic Plan on Official Languages

The Council of the Network has developed a strategic plan on official languages—Vision 2017—to support the work of official languages champions in departments, agencies and Crown corporations. This plan is supported by an action plan.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-668-9617

Department of National Defence

32. Various Promotional Items

An information package containing a wide range of promotional tools for employees and official languages coordinators. This kit includes posters, fact sheets on the language rights of civilian and military personnel, Hello/Bonjour stickers, brochures, notepads, bags, pens and calendars. These tools promote the official languages rights and obligations of civilian employees and military members.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-901-8881

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

33. Annual National Workshop for the Implementation of the Official Languages Act

The National Official Languages Workshop is an annual event that brings together members of the departmental official languages community from across Canada to attend presentations on various aspects of implementing the Official Languages Act at ESDC, participate in training related to departmental official languages initiatives and challenges, and network and share experiences and best practices with other ESDC official languages community members. In 2016, speakers at the National Workshop included the Executive Director of the Official Languages Centre of Excellence at Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, the CEO of the Translation Bureau, and the French Language Services Commissioner of Ontario, who addressed participants on this year's theme of the opportunities and challenges of digital technology for service delivery in English and French. Members were able to participate, in person, by videoconference or by WebEx. An interdepartmental panel was also organized to discuss official languages challenges and share good practices.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

34. Dashboard for Official Languages

The ESDC Dashboard for Official Languages is published every three months and provides a useful overview of departmental official languages performance. It is a reference tool that brings together key reporting indicators for all aspects of the Official Languages Program, including those used by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages to evaluate departments' official languages performance. These indicators are aligned with the Department's established performance indicators to measure service excellence.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

35. Enhanced Integrated Governance Structure for the Management of ESDC's Official Languages Program

For several years, the Official Languages Program at ESDC has been supported by a national official languages governance structure that integrates national and regional perspectives for all parts of the Official Languages Act (OLA). This structure is overseen by the ESDC Official Languages Steering Committee, an intradepartmental working group composed of the directors general and directors responsible for the implementation of the OLA within ESDC, the national and regional Official Languages Champions and Co-champions, and representatives from a limited number of departmental branches. In 2016, following a review of the official languages governance structure, membership of the ESDC Official Languages Steering Committee Network was expanded to include director general representatives from all branches and regions across the country. The reinforced ESDC Official Languages Steering Committee will allow for easier and more effective communication of official languages information and issues across the Department and among senior managers, while making it possible to approach issues related to the OLA in an even more integrated, horizontal manner. Moreover, the decision was also made to designate the Official Languages Steering Committee as part of the departmental executive committee structure, signalling ESDC's strong commitment to meeting its official languages obligations and the great importance placed by senior management on consideration of official languages impacts and implications in all aspects of the Department's work.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

36. Key Guiding Principles—Official Languages and Human Resources Planning and Staffing Activities

This document contains tips to help managers ensure that their human resources strategies and action plans take into account official languages considerations, which have a major impact on ESDC's obligations and employees' rights.

Mélanie.Brassard@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-6925

37. Official Languages Corner – Ontario Region

The Ontario Region's Official Languages Corner is a SharePoint site for staff that provides information and resources to assist employees with their everyday official languages needs, to promote linguistic duality as a valued characteristic of Canadian culture that should be reflected in the way we collaborate, and that places emphasis on languages of work in federal institutions and bilingualism as an essential component of leadership to advance true linguistic duality at Service Canada. The Official Languages Corner's goal is to support the implementation of the Official Languages Act in the Ontario Region as well as promote official languages as part of our commitment to service excellence.

Manal.Kodeih@servicecanada.gc.ca, 617-790-9367 or ON-PLAN-GD

38. Official Languages Framework – Ontario Region

The objectives of the Ontario Region's Official Languages Framework are to provide an integrated, strategic, and consistent approach to the implementation of Official Languages in the Ontario Region based on national and regional priorities; to raise awareness of obligations, roles and responsibilities under the Official Languages Act (OLA); to promote key strategic relationships to effectively implement the OLA; and to promote implementation of and compliance with the OLA, its policies and regulations.

Manal.Kodeih@servicecanada.gc.ca, 617-790-9367 or ON-PLAN-GD

39. Official Languages Integrated Approach

The Atlantic Region of ESDC has developed an integrated approach to the official languages file. With the addition of an official languages coordination role, the Official Languages Committee was revamped and now includes advisors and leads from all business lines. The Committee has developed an official languages plan integrating all aspects of official languages (including all parts of the Official Languages Act), as well as other topics, including language training, human resources planning, communications with employees and best practices. The approach allows for better accountability, efficiency and reporting and ensures that everything related to official languages can be found in one place.

Francine.Guerette@servicecanada.gc.ca, 506-777-6428

40. Official Languages Program Digital Display Animation

This 90-second digital display animation was originally developed for the departmental digital display network to raise ESDC employees' awareness of official languages and to invite them to visit the new Official Languages Program intranet site. Adapted versions are regularly used to promote official languages events, including Linguistic Duality Day and Les Rendez-vous de la Francophonie.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

41. Official Languages Program SharePoint Site

Using SharePoint, an online platform for the storage, organization, and sharing of information, allows members of the Official Languages Network of Coordinators to access documents related to their roles and responsibilities.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

42. Retractable Banner

This banner was created to promote the Official Languages Program during various events within the Department. It shows the "heart" of ESDC's Official Languages Program and has three slogans that represent the three branches responsible for implementing the Official Languages Act at ESDC.

Official Languages:
At the heart of service excellence
At the heart of our organizational values
At the heart of Canadian society

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

43. Information Sheets on Official Languages

These Information Sheets were developed to assist both managers and human resources advisors by providing them with basic information about Second Language Evaluations (SLE), Language training for statutory requirements, the Linguistic profile of bilingual positions, and the Active offer in bilingual offices and facilities.

Ghislaine.Laporte@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, 613-990-0080

44. Official Languages Action Plan 2014–2017

This document includes specific actions to improve our performance under each part of the Official Languages Act as well as information on our departmental context, assessments and risks.

Ghislaine.Laporte@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, 613-990-0080

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

45. Did you know…

"Did you know…" is a fun initiative that allows employees to familiarize themselves with various facts about official languages. "Did you know…" messages were posted on the Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada's intranet site every two weeks over a period of four months. These brief messages were designed to give employees tidbits of information on official languages that might inspire them to learn more.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

46. Framework on the Implementation of Official Languages

The Framework on the Implementation of Official Languages outlines Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada's commitments under the Official Languages Act as well as its regulations, policies and other related directives. The framework applies to all managers and employees and to all individuals or entities working for either of the organizations. It also applies to third parties acting on behalf of Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada, and to those who receive grants and contributions that involve delivery of services to the public. The framework oversees a series of directives and guides that are an integral part of the implementation of official languages in both organizations.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

47. Information Package: Learn More About Official Languages

This online information package provides managers and employees of Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada with awareness and knowledge of official languages and familiarizes them with Parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act, including the rights and responsibilities of managers and employees. Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada would like to thank the Canada Revenue Agency for the instructional material that was used to develop this product in collaboration with the Quebec Region, Health Canada.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

48. Promotional Official Languages Notepad

This handy notepad promotes the use of both official languages among Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada employees.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

49. Information Sharing Meetings: World Café

The World Café Committee, created in February 2014 and chaired by the Official Languages Secretariat, consists of IRCC employees from various sectors at the operational level working in the official languages file (parts IV, V, VI and VII). These informal meetings take place every six weeks and offer employees in remote areas the chance to participate by teleconference. With no official minutes or agenda, these meetings are a place for dialogue where each individual has the opportunity to provide an update on the work in their branch and to share meaningful information on official languages matters. These meetings are used to educate key players about various official languages priorities, encourage discussions of issues within the Department and identify possible solutions. These exchanges leave employees better informed of the directions of the various branches and further encourage collaboration.

Contact: IRCC.OL.Secretariat-Secretariat.LO.IRCC@cic.gc.ca

50. Official Languages Steering Committee

IRCC's Official Languages Steering Committee, composed of directors general from various sectors and regions, serves as a forum for senior management discussion and strategic guidance to oversee the development, monitoring and assessment of a horizontal, integrated action plan for implementing policies and programs in order to meet departmental obligations under the Official Languages Act.

Contact: IRCC.OL.Secretariat-Secretariat.LO.IRCC@cic.gc.ca

51. Two Official Languages Subcommittees for parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act

Two subcommittees have been created to enable directors to share information on the official languages, discuss issues affecting their sectors/regions and provide comments and input for departmental initiatives, guidelines, processes and plans.

Contacts: CIC-OL-LO@cic.gc.ca (for parts IV, V and VI) and IRCC.OL.Secretariat-Secretariat.LO.IRCC@cic.gc.ca (for part VII)

Infrastructure Canada (INFC)

52. INFRAmation Articles on the Official Languages

INFC has a weekly newsletter called INFRAmation. The official languages champion regularly posts information, articles or promotional materials on a variety of official languages–related subjects in this newsletter.

Melanie.Laflamme2@canada.ca, 613-941-3167

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED)

53. Departmental Official Languages Slogan and Poster

The Department held a contest during which employees were asked to send in their suggestions for a brand new slogan that would showcase the value of both official languages within the Department and serve as a reminder of the communication and career enhancement opportunities associated with learning and using a second official language. The slogan, "Two Languages, One Voice," was selected by employees. A special poster was designed by the Department's Communications and Marketing Branch to accompany the slogan. The new poster and slogan were unveiled at a special event and disseminated electronically to all employees. Posters were also put up in strategic areas within the Department. Since then, the slogan and poster have been used as a promotional tool for the various official languages initiatives undertaken within the Department.

Roda.Muse@canada.ca, 343-291-3049 or Samantha.Moonsammy@canada.ca, 613-762-2819

54. Official Languages Action Plan

ISED's integrated three-year action plan sets objectives in terms of expected results, outlines the accountability framework and lists the measures of success which the Department should achieve. The Action Plan ensures that official languages issues are considered in its approach to improving service to the public, creating an environment conducive to the use of both official languages in the workplace and providing support to official languages minority communities by incorporating these values into the Department's operational practices.

Dominique.Jolicoeur@canada.ca, 343-291-3150

55. Official Languages Engagement Plan

The annual Official Languages Engagement Plan is developed thanks to the contribution of the Department's Official Languages Network and includes a list of initiatives aimed at promoting an increasingly bilingual workplace. It focuses on aspects related to the language of work and learning a second official language. The Engagement Plan and its multiple initiatives, which is part of the Department's overall action plan, has generated enthusiasm for and maintained interest among employees in matters related to both official languages.

Roda.Muse@canada.ca. 343-291-3049

56. Official Languages Feedback Tool

ISED has implemented a new Official Languages Feedback Tool, based on a similar tool developed by Transport Canada, which makes it easy for employees to share best practices, identify concerns or request information pertaining to official languages. The tool, which is an electronic questionnaire, is available to all employees on the departmental Intranet site. The Official Languages Unit in the Human Resources Branch receives all comments, suggestions and information requests and works with the applicable business units to develop solutions to the issues raised. Comments can be made anonymously.

Dominique.Jolicoeur@canada.ca, 343-291-3150

Justice Canada

57. Common Policy Considerations Checklist

The Common Policy Considerations (CPC) Checklist is a comprehensive tool designed to help employees involved in policy and program development fulfill the requirements of a range of acts, directives and other high-level instructions (e.g., official languages, privacy, and gender-related impacts). The aim is to facilitate the consideration of factors that are important in policy development and common to the preparation of all Memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions. A completed CPC Checklist is mandatory for all Department of Justice Canada–led and co-led Cabinet documents. In the area of official languages, one of the questions the CPC Checklist asks is whether a proposed initiative could have an impact on an organization's capacity to communicate with and offer services to the public in both official languages, or whether it could have an impact on the use of French or English in the context of a criminal trial and/or a summary conviction process. In summary, the Checklists support risk-informed and integrated decision-making: the essential underpinnings of good public policy and sustainable development.

Sheena.Pahwa@justice.gc.ca, 613-946-3118

Library and Archives Canada (LAC)

58. Module on Official Languages – Mandatory Orientation Program for New Employees

The mandatory online Orientation Program for new employees includes a module on official languages. The following are some of the topics covered in this module: Official Languages at LAC; rights and obligations of employees regarding the language of work; the choice of official language in verbal, written and electronic communications; bilingual meetings – benefits and tips; communications with and services to the public; designation of bilingual offices; and active offer.

Claire.Lalonde@canada.ca, 613-797-3857

National Capital Commission (NCC)

59. Award of Excellence in Official Languages

This award was created to recognize and reward employees for outstanding achievements, attitudes and/or behaviours in the area of official languages. Employees can nominate colleagues who, they feel, exemplify excellence in official languages. The employee with the most nominations is presented the Award of Excellence in Official Languages during Linguistic Duality Day.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, ext. 5277

60. Official Languages Policy Update

The update is based on the Treasury Board's Official Languages Policy and guidelines.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, ext. 5277

61. Quiz on French and English Expressions

This fun quiz was created in 2011 for employees to celebrate Linguistic Duality Day. The object of the game is to match as many English expressions to their French equivalents. For example, "To have other fish to fry" = "Avoir d'autres chats à fouetter."

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, ext. 5277

62. Telephone Greeting and E-mail Signature Protocol

This document serves as a reference tool for employees' voice messaging and e-mail signature. All new employees receive a copy at their orientation session.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, ext. 5277

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

63. 2011–2014 Official Languages Action Plan

This action plan consists in a series of specific initiatives that allow NRCan to meet the requirements and act in the spirit of the Official Languages Act and to comply with the Official Languages Regulations and any related policies. Entitled Beyond Obligations: Revitalizing Official Languages at NRCan, this action plan is the impetus for real change, promoting a culture in which the Department proactively assumes its responsibilities under the Act.

Marie Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mariemadeleine.chourouba@canada.ca, 343-292-8455

64. Governance Structure for the Management of NRCan's Official Languages Program

One of NRCan's most significant accomplishments with respect to official languages is the implementation of an official languages governance structure based on collective leadership and a comprehensive approach. Collective leadership means that all sectors, managers and employees are mobilized and accountable for their obligations under the Official Languages Act. Although overseen by the Executive Committee, which sets key annual priorities and monitors progress, the governance structure is essentially the responsibility of the Official Languages Action Group. This action group is made up of sectoral and regional champions and coordinates the sectors' and regions' implementation of the action plan. It meets on a monthly basis to discuss official languages issues and provides guidance on initiatives. In conjunction with NRCan's Official Languages Expertise Centre, the action group provides the essential tools and support that the sectors need to implement the action plan. This official languages governance model allows the Department to approach issues related to various parts of the Act in an integrated, horizontal fashion. It also allows information to be centralized for more effective reporting and resource management.

Marie Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mariemadeleine.chourouba@canada.ca, 343-292-8455

65. Guide for Sector Official Languages Champions

This guide was developed to provide sectoral official languages champions with indispensable tools and methods for implementing the Official Languages Program within the Department. It is an integrated tool that consists of six modules. The guide explains how to set up a sectoral governance mechanism for official languages, raise awareness among managers and employees of official languages issues, provide employees and managers with the tools they need, display bilingualism, measure progress, and monitor official languages initiatives. The guide is simple and adaptable, and includes the methods and tools in a single document.

Marie-Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mfarmach@rncan.gc.ca, 613-996-6728

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

66. Beyond Words Newsletter

Beyond Words is an e-newsletter produced by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, showcasing initiatives, celebrations and the use of both official languages by Canadians. E-mail subscription is available.

Antonia.Papadakou@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4702

67. Celebrating Canada: A Guide to a Successful Bilingual Event

Canada's 150th anniversary, which we will celebrate in 2017, is fast approaching, and regional and national activities will be taking place all across the country. But every event—historical, athletic, cultural or artistic, national or international, large or small—can showcase our two official languages. To help you reach this objective, the Office of the Commissioner of Official languages invites you to read Celebrating Canada: A Guide to a Successful Bilingual Event. The guide presents good practices for planning an event that makes both English- and French-speaking Canadians feel welcome and represented.

RobertJames.Talbot@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4858

68. "Discover Our Official Languages" Trivia Game

The rich history and culture of Canada's English- and French-speaking communities is explored in this trivia game. The map of Canada will help players locate these communities, which are found throughout the country.

Antonia.Papadakou@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4702

69. Leaders 2.0L: A Tool for Enhancing Leadership

Being able to communicate in both official languages allows leaders to properly represent Canada and Canadians and helps them to fulfill their obligations under the Official Languages Act. This tool provides the criteria that must be taken into account in decision-making processes for Governor in Council appointments and for positions filled via federal public service hiring processes. It will help you assess whether knowledge of both official languages is required to fulfill the duties of a position.

Danielle.Muise@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4686

70. Organizing a Major Sporting Event in Canada: A Practical Guide to Promoting Official Languages

On March 7, 2011, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages published a practical guide for promoting official languages at major national and international sporting events held in Canada. The guide is based on the Final Report on the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games and provides organizers and federal departments and agencies with information, ideas and advice on how to take both of Canada's official languages into consideration when planning a large-scale sporting event. In addition to providing guidance for sporting event organizers, this guide can be useful for organizers of major cultural and artistic events, which involve many similar challenges.

RobertJames.Talbot@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4858

71. Survey: Official Languages and Bilingualism

In 2016, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages conducted a survey to gauge public opinions, perceptions and experiences regarding official languages and bilingualism and gather a detailed socio-cultural profile (habits, attitudes, values) of those who support and those who oppose official languages and bilingualism.

Véronique.Boudreau@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4698

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada

72. Official Language Tip of the Month

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada intranet site has an "Official Language Tip of the Month" which provides support and resources for those looking to improve their second language skills.

Frank.Lebouthillier@priv.gc.ca, 819-994-5543

Parks Canada

73. Templates for Official Languages Data Standards Collection

The templates for official languages data standards collection were built to improve data quality standards and provide employees with clear data definition and documented business procedures. The data standards for appointment official language status and the data standards for linguistic status set the rules which the data must comply with so that business processes can be executed properly and Parks Canada employees can be paid accurately. An official languages info data-entry cheat sheet was also created to facilitate accurate data entries. The Human Resources Director's Management Committee has identified this tool as a best practice, and it will serve as a model to be used by all human resources teams.

Contact: LO-OL@pc.gc.ca

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

74. Leadership Competency Profile for Official Languages and Self-Assessment Tool

The PPSC promoted the Leadership Competency Profile for Official Languages, the Self-Assessment tool and the training provided by the Canada School of Public Service to its managers to help them understand their obligations under the Official Languages Act.

Contact: Human Resources Administration Unit, HRAU-UARH@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca

75. Legal and Jurilinguistic Resources Portal

A capsule was inserted in the PPSC Communiqué announcing Jurisource.ca, which is a portal of judicial and jurilinguistic resources for professionals in the field of justice, gathering in one place all that is done or written with regards to justice. The gateway is a virtual library, made up of powerful search engines, counting millions of resources at all times on: Law, arrests, studies, reports, lexicon, linguistic capsules, Act models, etc. For the time being, the portal primarily focuses on francophone resources. However, it intends on making available a large number of English resources for professionals working in Anglophone minority communities. This tool is unique in that it was created by the legal community and is directly being fed by the latter. The PPSC was one of the partners involved in developing this tool.

Contact: Human Resources Administration Unit, HRAU-UARH@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca

76. Quiz

The PPSC has produced a quiz for employees to assess their knowledge of official languages. Available online to all employees, the quiz was launched on Linguistic Duality Day. It covers both PPSC's obligations under the Official Languages Act as well as under Part XVII of the Criminal Code.

Robert.Doyle@ppsc-sppc.gc.ca, 613-952-0267

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

77. Fact Sheets

Fact sheets are made available to employees to help them better understand their rights and obligations. These fact sheets are for frequently asked questions and provide an understanding of the Official Languages Act (OLA). They are not exhaustive, but they address the essential elements of the OLA that are of interest to employees.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Quebec Federal Council (QFC)

78. Official Languages Committee of the Quebec Federal Council

The Official Languages Committee is responsible for bringing together executives and managers in the Quebec Region to exchange information and best practices, as well as develop and implement actions related to parts IV to VII of the Official Languages Act, in accordance with the priorities of the strategic framework of the Quebec Federal Council.

Michel.SaintDenis@canada.ca, 514-283-5797

79. Official Languages Interdepartmental Network (OLIN)

Working under the aegis of the QFC's Official Languages Committee (QFC-OL), the OLIN is composed of representatives of federal departments in Quebec, who are responsible for parts IV to VII of the Act. The network's mandate is to share and/or develop tools and best practices and discuss challenges related to the Act and to provide recommendations to the QFC-OL. Since 2010, one of the network's central goals has been to broaden and strengthen representation of Part VII and, at the same time, increase the focus on official language minority community development, so as to promote a better understanding of the link between Part VII of the Act and aspects of human resource management in the area of official languages.

Kathleen.Wheeley@canada.ca, 514-283-0949

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

80. Official Languages Action Plan 2015-2018

This action plan is aligned with the RCMP's corporate strategy, priorities and core values, and focuses on improving performance towards full compliance with the Official Languages Act, particularly with respect to Part IV—Communications with and Service to the Public, Part V—Language of Work, and Part VII—Advancement of English and French.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

81. Posters: Preserving our Official Languages…Our Heritage and Identity

These posters were designed for the "Our Heritage, Our Advantage" awareness campaign in order to inform employees about the importance and value that both official languages have within the RCMP and Canadian society.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Statistics Canada

82. "Martin the Moose" Promotional and Awareness Campaign

This is an informative promotional campaign that uses humour to pique the interest of employees. It used various campaign tools featuring characters Martin the Moose, Gaby the Goose, Maurice la morue (the Cod) and Betty-Lou le hibou(the Owl). The key messages included communication with and services to the public, active offer of service, using and maintaining second-language skills, and bilingual meetings. The campaign kicked off with an enigmatic e-mail ("The moose is on the loose. Watch out for it." « L'orignal est en cavale. Gardez l'œil ouvert. »), followed by appearances of the characters in life-size cut-out form in the lobbies of all of our buildings. Another e-mail was then sent out and a number of tools launched:

  • A poster on bilingual meetings was posted on all meeting room doors.
  • A table tent on bilingual meetings, to complement the poster, was placed in all meeting rooms.
  • A booklet on how to use and maintain second-language skills was distributed to employees who were completing a language training program.
  • A postcard on actively offering services was handed out to all employees.
  • A short video covering all of the campaign themes was posted and is still available on the intranet.
  • A self-portrait contest was held to give employees the chance to win one of the characters.

The campaign drew a lot of attention and conveyed important messages in a fun and unique way.

Jean.Duval@canada.ca, 613-404-2402 or Annik.Lepage@canada.ca, 613-698-9159

83. Official Languages Excellence Award

Since 1999, this award has been given out every year by Statistics Canada's Official Languages Committee to recognize major accomplishments, remarkable initiatives and best practices related to the Agency's Official Languages Program.

Jean.Duval@canada.ca, 613-404-2402

84. Subcommittee of Official Languages Coordinators

The Subcommittee of Official Languages Coordinators' responsibilities include but are not limited to: identifying situations that enhance or hinder the use of both official languages at work; providing suggestions on how to improve bilingualism; planning and proposing activities aimed at promoting bilingualism. In other words, Official Languages Coordinators are appointed to lend an ear to their colleagues and their concerns.

Jean.Duval@canada.ca, 613-404-2402

Translation Bureau

85. Flash Quiz

The Language Portal of Canada's Flash Quiz helps federal employees improve their language skills in just two minutes a week.

Contact: noslangues.ourlanguages@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

86. Terminology Standardization Committees and Networks

The Translation Bureau belongs to a number of terminology standardization committees and networks, including the following:

  • Ammunition and Explosives Terminology Panel
  • Comité de terminologie de Radio-Canada
  • Commissions spécialisées de terminologie et de néologie of the French Republic
  • Defence Terminology Standardization Board
  • Entraide Traduction Santé network
  • Geographical Names Board of Canada
  • Joint Terminology Panel
  • Rail Terminology Approval Committee
  • Réseau panlatin de terminologie
  • World Road Association

These committees and networks are often created at the request of federal departments to standardize the terminology used by their organization or in a specific field. In some cases, the Bureau coordinates or manages the committee's work, which can result in the production of glossaries or other terminological publications (generally available via the TERMIUM Plus® web page). Field experts, language professionals (including terminologists and linguists) and other players in the field sit on these committees.

Chantal.Reid@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 819-994-5939

Transport Canada

87. Guide to Official Languages in Transfer Payment Programs

This guide is a comprehensive resource developed to provide program managers and officers responsible for developing and implementing transfer payment programs with the guidance and tools required to ensure compliance with parts IV, V and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Kara.Arsenault@tc.gc.ca, 613-990-2887

88. Official Languages Feedback Tool

The Official Languages Feedback Tool enables employees to submit comments on official languages through a short questionnaire available on the intranet. It allows employees from all regions to provide feedback on good practices or on issues they have had related to official languages. This enables human resources to follow up with management to share the feedback. If there are issues, the tool allows HR to work with management to solve the issue in a timely manner.

Valerie.Gravieve@tc.gc.ca, 613-294-5905 or Francois.Ste-Marie@tc.gc.ca, 613-991-0161

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

89. Manager's Guide to Official Languages in Human Resources Management

This user-friendly guide, available on TBS's intranet, provides managers with a summary and overview of official languages as they relate to human resources management. This guide includes information on the language requirements of positions, bilingual capacity of the work unit, changes to the language requirements of a position, creating and staffing a position and second language evaluation.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC)

90. Veterans Affairs Canada's Official Languages Action Plan (2016-2019)

This document outlines the activities planned for engaging all levels of the Department in ensuring compliance with the Official Languages Act, respect for employee rights and the creation of a workplace conducive to the use of both official languages.

Contact: VAC.CorporateResourcing-RessourcementMinisteriel.ACC@vac-acc.gc.ca

Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD)

91. Official Languages ADM and Annual Reports on Official Languages

The audience for the Official Languages ADM Champion Reports is WD's Executive Committee (EXCOMM) and staff. These internal reports complement the Official Languages Annual Review which departments must prepare for Canadian Heritage and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, as they provide information that contributes to a fuller picture of the work the WD does to meet its obligations under the Official Languages Act (OLA). The reports are produced at mid-year and at year-end to summarize the department's activities and results related to the department's Official Languages Action Plan. The reports include such topics as changes to the Official Languages Team membership; reporting obligations completed; the number and types of activities undertaken under each of the OLA Parts; and quantitative details of projects that have impacts on Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs). The reports also give an indication of activities planned for the next half of the year or the next year. The reports are tabled at EXCOMM, then posted to WDNet for all staff to access. 

Linda.Quan@canada.ca, 613-325-4473

92. Official Languages Lens for Impacts of Grants and Contribution Projects on Western Francophone Communities

Project officers can actively contribute to the economic advancement of the Francophone community through project review. An Official Languages Lens is part of WD's project due diligence requirements, and it is embedded in the Department's project management system. The Official Languages Lens is a short list of questions that help project officers determine whether a project has the potential for positive impacts on the economic development of Francophone communities. This due diligence tool is part of our review of federal horizontal requirements and considerations.

Stephen.Lamoureux@canada.ca, 780-495-7269

Roles and Responsibilities

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

1. Official Languages Accountability Framework

This framework explains the roles and responsibilities of all employees, starting with the President of ACOA followed by the Official Languages Champion, the members of the Official Languages Management Committee, the Finance and Corporate Services Branch, the Policy and Programs Branch, the Official Languages Coordinators Committee, managers and employees.

Ginette.LeBlanc@canada.ca, 506-851-6508

Canada Border Service Agency (CBSA)

2. Guide for Employees and Managers on Official Languages

This guide is posted on the CBSA's official languages intranet site and can be downloaded easily. The guide explains the roles and responsibilities of each employee with respect to official languages, including service to the public and language of work. It was recently modified to include the roles of members of a selection committee. The guide also contains information on linguistic profiles, language training, active offer and communications between the regions.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

Canada Economic Development for the Quebec Regions (CED)

3. Official Languages Accountability Framework

This framework sets out the terms and conditions for implementing the Official Languages Act at the Agency. It provides detailed information on the responsibilities of the various stakeholders in this area.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

Canada School of Public Service

4. Guide to Official Languages Best Practices for Instructional Designers

The purpose of the guide is to make instructional designers aware of their responsibilities with regard to official languages and to support them when they are developing learning products. 

Robert.Beaumier@canada.ca, 613-853-6369

Canadian Heritage

5. List of Contact Persons for the Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act in Federal Institutions

This is a list of the contact persons responsible for implementing section 41 of the Act at the national level.

Sarah.Boily@canada.ca, 819-934-9195

Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

6. Role and Responsibilities of the Official Languages Champion

Since duties and governance models can vary from one organization to another, this generic document was designed for departments and agencies to take from it whatever information addresses their particular circumstances with regard to applying the Official Languages Act. It includes a list of sample activities that reflect the role and responsibilities of an official languages champion.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-668-9617

Department of National Defence

7. Role and Competency Profile of Coordinators of Official Languages

This document outlines the roles, responsibilities and competency profiles of the official languages coordinators at all levels within the Department.

Nathalie.Lauzon@forces.gc.ca, 613-901-8881

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

8. Online Official Languages Training Modules

Two online training modules were developed. The first module, Exercising my Leadership in Official Languages, provides managers with an overview of the various components of the Official Languages Act. Without this essential knowledge, managers are unable to fulfill their official languages roles and responsibilities. The second module, Official Languages and Me, provides employees with relevant information about their day-to-day work, service excellence and maintaining an environment conducive to the use of both official languages.

Contact: NC-OL_PROGRAM-PROGRAMME_LO-GD@servicecanada.gc.ca

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

9. Official Languages Accountability Framework

This framework outlines how the use of both official languages is implemented in both departments. It provides detailed information regarding stakeholders' responsibilities.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

10. Role and Responsibilities of the Official Languages Coordinators

This document lists the official languages coordinators' responsibilities with regard to parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

Justice Canada

11. Official Languages Governance Chart

This chart presents a diagram of the various stakeholders in the governance of official languages within the federal sphere, as well as their respective roles.

Michel.Francoeur@justice.gc.ca, 613-957-4967

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

12. Official Languages Guide for Managers and Employees

This guide for managers and employees is a compilation of tools involving service to the public and language of work. It sets out the rights and responsibilities of managers and employees with regard to language.

Marie Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mariemadeleine.chourouba@canada.ca, 343-292-8455

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

13. Lists of Official Languages Contact Persons

This list includes the name and contact information of the person responsible for official languages in each institution that is subject to the Official Languages Act. It also includes contact information for the official languages champions of each institution and each regional federal council. It is updated with the information submitted to TBS by federal organizations. Those on the list are the best points of contact for any questions regarding official languages in a specific federal organization.

Contact: OLCEInformationCELO@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC)

14. Terms of Reference—Official Languages Advisory Committee

This document describes the committee's mandate, structure and responsibilities.

Contact: VAC.CorporateResourcing-RessourcementMinisteriel.ACC@vac-acc.gc.ca

Second Language Evaluation

Air Canada

1. Online Management Application for Language Testing

eLang is an online management application for language testing that employees who have to be tested can use to schedule an appointment or consult their language profile at any time.

Caroline.Demers@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6170

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

2. Preparing for Your Second Official Language Training

This guide, which is found in the Official Languages Resource Centre section of the CFIA's intranet, presents information and ideas from various sources to help employees prepare for a second official language course. It outlines the employees' day-to-day work activities, what is expected of a new student, how to handle work related questions from colleagues and how to stay in touch.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

Infrastructure Canada (INFC)

3. Second Language Evaluation (SLE) Testing Guidelines

INFC has included an appendix to its Language Training Guidelines, which outlines when employees may be SLE tested. It also ensures that employees are not SLE tested unnecessarily to avoid congesting the testing system or risk failing to obtain the levels required for their position.

Melanie.Laflamme2@canada.ca, 613-941-3167

Public Service Commission of Canada

4. Second Language Writing Skills Self-Assessment

The Second Language Writing Skills Self-Assessment, when hiring managers have opted to include it in the application process, is a tool available for individuals applying to bilingual positions. It is an optional, unsupervised Internet test designed to provide job applicants with information about their second language writing skills, in relation to the second language standards. Applicants can use the test results when considering applying for bilingual positions.

Since December 2015, new self-assessment tests have been made available online to provide individuals with an indication of their proficiency level against existing Second Language Assessment standards (A, B, C). These self-assessment tests are available to everyone and assess both writing and reading skills.

Contact: Personnel Psychology Centre, CFP.CPP-PPC.PSC@cfp-psc.gc.ca, 819-420-8671

5. Tripartite Review Board and Detailed Feedback

This Board was formed by the Public Service Commission, in conjunction with the Canada School of Public Service's Language Training Centre, to review cases of employees who have been unable to obtain their target level in oral interaction, even after taking the Second Language Evaluation (SLE) Test of Oral Proficiency (TOP) three or more times. The Board will make advisory recommendations on what can be done to improve a candidate's chances of obtaining the target level. Candidates seeking more information about their strengths and weaknesses during their last TOP can request a detailed feedback session with the Personnel Psychology Centre's TOP Quality Control unit.

Contact: CFP.TCO-CQ-QC-TOP.PSC@cfp-psc.gc.ca, 819-420-8766

6. Video: How Well Do I Speak French?

This video explains to federal public service applicants and federal employees who will be taking the Second Language Evaluation (SLE) Test of Oral Proficiency (TOP) what they can expect before and during their test, as well as some tips for preparing for the TOP.

Selma.Incesulu@cfp-pcs.gc.ca, 819-420-8767

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

7. Directive on Second Language Evaluation

The RCMP, in collaboration with the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC), has developed and implemented a directive to support the recruiting effort and address the high volume of Second Language Evaluations (SLE) requests to access the test of oral proficiency (TOP). The Directive, established on a priority basis, helps speed up the process in hiring bilingual candidates who require testing by the PSC.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Statistics Canada

8. Strategy on the Validity of Second Language Evaluation Results

To maintain a truly bilingual work environment, Statistics Canada has adopted a strategy requiring employees in a bilingual position to have up-to-date Second Language Evaluation (SLE) results. Directors are responsible for developing an action plan for their division. All employees in a bilingual position whose SLE results are expired are invited to take the SLE again, even if these employees remain in the same position (unless they are exempted from further testing). The action plan can include the following measures: discussion with the employee during the performance review, exercises and SLE preparatory workshops, language training, self-learning with reasonable deadlines (for example, two to three months), SLE tests and creation of a bilingual work environment to provide second-language retention.

Jean.Duval@canada.ca, 613-404-2402

Second Language Training and Maintenance

Air Canada

1. "I am learning French" Pins

A pin that reads "I am learning French" is offered to all employees who are learning French. Employees who wear one will try to speak French more often, knowing that customers who see the pin will be more patient and understanding. This initiative was implemented after several employees admitted to not making an active offer or even trying to say a few words in French for fear of not understanding the Francophone customer's reply.

Danielle.Ferrante@aircanada.ca, 604-270-5557

2. Language Training Programs

Air Canada offers its employees a wide range of language courses, in-class training, online modules and personalized coaching. Courses are developed by an internal team of instructors and developers who have designed Language Training Programs tailored to employees' needs and linguistic levels to help them in their work environment. Air Canada offers an accelerated training program, specialized workshops, and skills maintenance courses to help employees maintain and improve their language skills in order to pass their language test and meet the language requirement of bilingual positions. Language training at Air Canada also offers a centralized program for English as a second language and personalized coaching on demand in the two official languages. In the Air Canada intranet, employees have access to self-study training material and reference manuals.

Danielle.Ferrante@aircanada.ca, 604-270-5557

3. Specialized and Customized Online Training

Air Canada has developed a specialized and customized online training course to offer greater flexibility to employees who wish to improve their vocabulary, dialogue and expressions at their own pace.

Danielle.Ferrante@aircanada.ca, 604-270-5557

Atlantic Federal Council (AFC)

4. Initiatives of the Official Languages Sub-Committee

Recognizing that English and French are fundamental characteristics of the Canadian identity and of the public service, the AFC formed an official languages sub-committee to help carry out this Government of Canada priority in the Atlantic region. The sub-committee prepared an inventory of linguistic training needs in the region's federal institutions, launched an interdepartmental language training pilot project for employees wishing to reach level C in French, and organized the Atlantic Official Languages Week and also the Linguistic Duality Day – both annual events.

Paul.Landry@canada.ca, 506-851-7069

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

5. Gap-closing Program

The CBSA is investing heavily in the official language training of all supervisors in bilingual regions who do not meet the linguistic profile. These supervisors are given access to innovative and personalized training provided by the CBSA's Official Languages School. The GAP-closing program is designed to bring motivated students from XXX to BBB in 12 months or from BBB to CBC in 6 months. Not only do these employees achieve their levels within the above-stated timeframe, but they are able to continue to work in the meantime!

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

6. "Help Me Practice My English / Aidez-moi à pratiquer mon français" Poster

Created in 2008, employees who want to become more proficient in their second official language can print and display this poster in their office. The goal is to encourage their colleagues to speak to them in their second official language.

Isabelle.Lemieux@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca, 613-952-3145

7. National Language Training Strategy

The CBSA implemented a National Language Training Strategy (LTS), a supporting pillar of the CBSA Official Languages Directives. The LTS establishes and defines CBSA official languages training programs to ensure that consistent training approaches and delivery strategies are applied across the Agency. It also defines learning programs that effectively help to increase the bilingual capacity within the CBSA and guides learners and managers in developing successful individual second language learning strategies. Finally, it establishes results based on tracking and reporting processes that measure return on investment.

Contact: OL_training-formation_LO@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

Canada Economic Development Agency for the Quebec Regions (CED)

8. Interdepartmental Twinning Program

This program is made possible through our partnership with other Regional Development Agencies. This interdepartmental pool allows us to access a pool of Anglophone participants. There are too few Anglophones at CED to maintain such a program. Twinning is a partnership between two participants (one Anglophone and one Francophone) from different departments who want to speak in both official languages in order to maintain their second language skills. It is recommended that participants speak a minimum of 20 minutes in each official language, at least once a week.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

9. Linguistic Duality Day

The second Thursday of September, we organize a presentation  involving linguistic  games (idiomatic expressions, English tongue twisters, French tongue twisters, spoonerisms, anglicisms, etc.) for all CED employees.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

10. Linguistic Training Policy

This document, available on CED's intranet, has been developed to ensure that Agency employees and managers are aware of the linguistic training possibilities.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

11. Linguistic Training via Show View and Exchanges

This training allows employees to watch a show, a documentary or a movie and participate in a group discussion about current expressions, vocabulary, and some grammar.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

12. Thursdays in our Second Official Language

Every Thursday, employees use their second official language at work.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

13. "Today, in English please! / Aujourd'hui en français s.v.p.!" Pins

These pins are distributed to Agency employees who wish to practise using their second official language. We are promoting Second Language Thursdays.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

14. Workshops to Develop Second Language Skills

CED offers employees the opportunity to attend workshops to improve their oral and written language skills two hours a week on shared time.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)

15. The Amazing Race of Linguistic Duality

During linguistic duality week in September 2015, CMHC organized an activity to raise awareness about the importance of linguistic duality. The Amazing Race of Linguistic Duality was a structured set of activities related to Canada's two official languages to be completed by small teams racing against each other to finish the activities first. The Amazing Race of Linguistic Duality was a fun event to celebrate Canada's two official languages and to practise second language skills.

Roxanne Gallagher, rgallagh@cmhc-schl.gc.ca, 613-748-4516

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

16. French Language Retention Sessions

In the CRA's Prairie Region, bilingual employees and employees working on obtaining their Second Language Evaluation (SLE) levels are encouraged to attend weekly French Language Retention Sessions. During these sessions, employees are encouraged to test their skills by doing quizzes on grammar, punctuation, spelling and vocabulary on the Language Portal of Canada's website, reviewing the CRA lexicon, terminology and acronyms used in the Agency and/or viewing francophone television series.

Sari.Abdallah@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-853-0611

17. Newspapers in the Minority Official Language

In some of the CRA's Prairie Region offices, French language newspapers have been made available to employees to provide them with another opportunity to improve their French reading skills and to make them aware of official language minority community events.

Sari.Abdallah@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-853-0611

18. Official Language Info-Capsules

Just one of many initiatives for improving or maintaining employees' second official language in the CRA's Quebec Region, these info-capsules consist in weekly bilingual messages posted on an internal television circuit, informing employees on the usage of English or French expressions, along with their equivalent in the other official language.

Sari.Abdallah@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-853-0611

19. Toastmasters—Montreal

The Montreal Tax Services Office started its Toastmasters Club—Aim High at CRA Montreal for the French Language Club and Visez haut à l'ARC Montréal for the English Language Club. Alternating weekly meetings—a meeting in French one week and a meeting in English the next—are held at lunch time. The goal is to have participants develop communication and leadership skills in their official language or their second official language.

Sari.Abdallah@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-853-0611

20. Toastmasters—Pacific Region

The CRA's Pacific Region supports a French Toastmaster's Club, including its sessions focused on technical terminology. Members of this Club gave a presentation entitled "A Tale of Two Languages" on Linguistic Duality Day. This presentation consisted of humorous monologues on both official languages, followed by an interactive discussion.

Sari.Abdallah@cra-arc.gc.ca, 613-853-0611

Canada School of Public Service

21. Official Languages and Training and Maintenance – Online Products

The School encourages and supports official language learning and skill maintenance for all public servants across the country. It also participates in reinforcing a culture of bilingualism in the public service. The School targets the needs of all departments by offering a variety of online self-paced learning products and self-assessment tools, in French and in English, to assist employees in maintaining or improving their second language skills. The catalogue of online language training products contains self-paced and interactive practical exercises designed to improve reading and listening comprehension and written and oral expression skills as well as pronunciation, grammar and fluency in the second official language.

Carole.Boire@canada.ca, 819-934-2617

Canadian Commercial Corporation

22. Pictionary: The Game of Quick Draw

To highlight Linguistic Duality Day annually within the Canadian Commercial Corporation, we play Pictionary: The Game of Quick Draw. This fun initiative gives employees at all levels, including the President, the opportunity to enhance their English- and French-language abilities while sharpening their drawing skills!

Julie Guindon, jguindon@ccc.ca, (613) 995-3365

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

23. Didactical Material on Official Languages

The Official Languages Committee of the Quebec Operational Centre of the CFIA has acquired didactical material on official languages that include idiomatic expressions in French along with their English equivalents, grammatical exercises in English, and others.

Sylvie.Brisebois@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815, ext. 4225

24. English Lunch and Learn Events

The purpose of these events is to bring CFIA employees in the region of Quebec together at lunchtime to talk in English and thus maintain and improve their second language. The participants must have Level B or C oral proficiency in English. Employees whose mother tongue is English serve as moderators. Participants at the same language level meet at the same time with a moderator for a free discussion in English about a pre-determined subject. No preparation or exercises are expected of the participants. The participants and moderators receive a certificate at the end of the session.

Sylvie.Brisebois@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815, ext. 4225

25. Fridays in English

On a voluntary basis, CFIA employees in the region of Quebec are encouraged to communicate in English at work every Friday. This enables employees to break the ice and maintain and improve their English skills, using vocabulary directly related to their work.

Joanne.Riendeau@inspection.gc.ca, 418-648-7373, poste 263

26. Fridays in the Second Language

On a voluntary basis, employees are encouraged to communicate in their second official language at work every Friday. This enables employees to break the ice and maintain and improve their second official language skills, using vocabulary directly related to their work.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

27. Language Training Videos by the Official Languages Centre for Maintaining or Improving Second Language Skills

The CFIA has developed a series of language training videos for employees which have been placed on USB keys. These videos can be used anywhere and provide clear explanations for the writing exercises and strategies for succeeding at the oral exam. The video lessons cover the required skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing to increase and maintain vocabulary and improve grammar proficiency in the official language of choice.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

28. "Learn in Your Car" CDs

These CDs, called "Learn in Your Car—English 1, 2 and 3," are available to staff. This interactive tool enables CFIA employees in the Quebec region to maintain and improve their English while in their car. Level 1 focuses on the essential travel vocabulary, while levels 2 and 3 contain more conversational elements and go into grammar and vocabulary in more depth. For each level, there are three audio CDs and a listening guide containing the recorded text and grammar notes (total of three hours of listening time each).

Nathalie.Boucher@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815, ext. 4271

29. Maintaining your Second Official Language

This toolkit, which is found in the Official Languages Resource Centre section of the CFIA's intranet, presents information and ideas from various sources to help employees apply and maintain their second official language in their day-to-day activities.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

30. Official Languages Resource Centre

This section of the CFIA's intranet site was developed to help CFIA employees find everything they need to apply their second official language and acquire skills to help learn, maintain and improve their second official language.

Hollweg.Apollon@inspection.gc.ca, 613-773-6652

31. "Parlons anglais" ("Let's Speak English") DVD and CD

This interactive tool has beginner, intermediate and advanced levels. It enables CFIA employees in the Quebec region to maintain and improve their English. It is based on a three-pronged instructional approach that allows participants to determine their learning priorities and current level, and work at home or in their car to develop both written and spoken language skills. It also has voice recognition for practising pronunciation; vocabulary and grammar exercises; lessons on travel, business and day-to-day life; cultural videos on a number of cities around the world; and an integrated dictionary. It includes a DVD, a CD, a headset with an integrated microphone, an exercise book and a laptop loaned to the participant by the CFIA's Quebec Office.

Nathalie.Boucher@inspection.gc.ca, 514-283-3815, ext. 4271

Canadian Heritage

32. Departmental Fund for Language Training

This fund assists branches and regions that lack the funds to support their employees' language training needs.

Dominique.Pilon@canada.ca, 819-994-5521

33. Language Buddy Program

The Language Buddy Program pairs employees who wish to improve their second language skills with volunteers who help them practise.

Karine.Andraos@canada.ca, 819-778-0227

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC)

34. Internal Part-Time English Language Training Offered from September to June

As part of the English language training program, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission provides pronunciation classes that take into account the challenges faced by Francophone staff members and of those of other origins.

Nathalie.Giard@canada.ca, 613-943-9373

35. Internal Part-Time French Language Training Offered from September to June

For French language training, weekly and annual learning plans, available in electronic format, are used so that staff members who are often called upon to work outside the office can access self-learning from anywhere during their absence.

Nathalie.Giard@canada.ca, 613-943-9373

36. Preparation for Second Language Testing

As part of career development, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission offers second language learners a preparation for Public Service Commission second language evaluation tests. The preparation which is designed to help employees maximize their chances of achieving their goals, includes reading test and writing test preparation group workshops and individual simulations for the oral proficiency test.

Nathalie.Giard@canada.ca, 613-943-9373

37. Training by Videoconference for Our Site and Regional Offices

Language training by videoconference allows employees at sites and regional offices to receive their training with their colleagues in the National Capital Region. The training combines traditional classroom and videoconference training, and encourages all learners to participate actively. It also helps to strengthen their sense of belonging and promotes discussion between employees regardless of their geographic location.

Nathalie.Giard@canada.ca, 613-943-9373

Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

38. DARE! OSEZ! Poster

This poster was developed to support the work of the official languages champions, who are committed to promoting linguistic duality, but especially to encourage federal employees to communicate in their second language and to invite their colleagues to do the same. The poster is a reminder not to worry about making mistakes. The goal is not for employees to communicate flawlessly, but to challenge themselves, maintain and develop their second language skills, and thus become better communicators.

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca, 613-668-9617

Federal Youth Network (FYN)

39. Reverse Mentoring Inventory

Are you interested in practicing your second official language, learning more about Web 2.0, acquiring more knowledge in your field, maintaining dialogue, and obtaining guidance from fellow public servants? Do you want to keep pace with the Clerk of the Privy Council's priorities of renewing the workplace, embracing new technologies and retaining talent? FYN has officially launched the National Mentoring Inventory on the Jobs Marketplace on GCconnex. This tool is available to executives, managers and public servants looking to develop mentoring relationships including traditional mentoring, reverse mentoring, peer-to-peer mentoring, and wisdom/transition mentoring. To participate, you must create and update your GCconnex profile to ensure that your most recent information is displayed (ex: education, skills, work experience, second language). Select "Mentoring" in the Opt-in options found at the bottom of the page to successfully enroll as a mentor and/or mentee. This will enable you to appear in future keyword search results on the site when other users are seeking a mentee or a mentor.

In partnership with the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions, FYN has extended the mentoring offer to include official languages to allow participants to converse with one or more mentors of their choice with a view to maintaining and improving the use of their second official language.

Sandra.DiGnagbo@canada.ca, 613-218-4343 or Jodi.Leblanc@canada.ca, 902-314-1390

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

40. Developmental Language Training Guidelines

This document helps our managers determine priorities for developmental language training; it is quite useful, given the increasing demand for language training in a resource reduction context.

Ghislaine.Laporte@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, 613-990-0080

41. Tips to maintain your second language

This brochure contains quick and easy tips for maintaining language skills.

Ghislaine.Laporte@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, 613-990-0080

Global Affairs Canada (GAC)

42. Free Weekly Courses

At the beginning of each fall and winter season, Global Affairs Canada offers its Canadian employees in the National Capital Region (NCR) weekly two-hour courses. This weekly training lasts about 25 weeks, split into two sessions. Those responsible for courses try to meet needs identified by learners when they register. A total of 80 courses are thus implemented.

Paul.Rousseau@international.gc.ca, 343-203-1994

43. Matchmaking

The Global Affairs Canada Official Languages Program implemented a wiki page on which the Department's employees are invited to register to find a match in order to practise their second language during breaks, lunches or any other occasions the two participants consider appropriate.

Paul.Rousseau@international.gc.ca, 343-203-1994

44. Virtual Learning

For several years, Global Affairs Canada has offered its Canadian employees and locally engaged staff, free of charge, a virtual learning tool called Tell me More from supplier Rosetta Stone. Learners can be guided in English or French and can also choose from dozens of foreign languages available, which is ideal for anyone whose first language is not English or French. Learners can practise and develop their abilities in reading and writing, as well as using the voice recognition component to work on their oral skills. A placement test is available that indicates the user's current level (Beginner/Intermediate (A1/A2), Fluent (B1), Advanced (B2) or Expert (C1)).

Paul.Rousseau@international.gc.ca, 343-203-1994

Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada

45. Directive on Language Training and the Maintenance of Language Competencies

The purpose of this directive is to guide managers and employees regarding access to language training at the Crown's expense by establishing priorities, procedures and monitoring mechanisms.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

46. Language Retention Kits: French as a Second Language and English as a Second Language

These two kits offer a full range of resources and tools that can help employees maintain and improve their second language proficiency. One is for maintaining English as a second language and the other for maintaining French as a second language.

Monique.Gasengayire@hc-sc.gc.ca, 613-960-1584

47. Video: Being Bilingual, an Invaluable Asset

This video was developed to encourage employees at all levels to learn, maintain and improve their official languages skills. The video features testimonials from employees and our most senior officials, who share their experiences in official languages acquisition and explain how being bilingual has had a positive impact on their careers and in their personal lives.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

48. Word of the Week

Word of the Week is a fun initiative for employees to learn new words and broaden their vocabulary, in both official languages. A Word of the Week, including a brief definition and an example of its use, was displayed on the Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada's intranet site every two weeks over a period of four months. This initiative gave the employees the opportunity to broaden their vocabulary in both official languages and to use these words in their daily exchanges with their colleagues.

Marc.Desroches@canada.ca, 613-808-1885

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

49. Directive on Second Language Training

This directive is designed to ensure that employees have access to second language training in order to meet and maintain the language requirements of bilingual positions in support of Official Languages Act requirements, as well as Public Service Commission and Treasury Board of Canada policies. The Department also commits to ensuring that employees have access to second language training in order to fulfill their career aspirations. The key objectives of this directive are to ensure that employees have the necessary linguistic capacity to fulfill their official languages obligations, to maintain a work environment conducive to the use of both official languages, to improve second language skills to meet future operational needs and to ensure that all employees have access to second language training.

Contact: CIC-OL-LO@cic.gc.ca

50. For the Love of English / Pour l'amour du français – Internal Language Training Program

The For the Love of English / Pour l'amour du françaisprogram is a flexible self-directed language training option available to all IRCC employees, in Canada or abroad, at no cost to the learner's branch/region. This program allows employees to choose the time and place for learning, according to their schedule and their needs. This online computer-based training contains 15 modules that develop language skills from beginner to advanced level.

Contact: CIC.OLTaining-FormationLO.CIC@cic.gc.ca

51. Shared Responsibility Program: Assistance Program for Official Languages Training After Work Hours

The Assistance Program for Official Language Training After Work Hours allows IRCC employees to register for part-time group training after work hours and be reimbursed after successful completion for up to $700 per fiscal year. This option applies to language training activities and courses taken at institutions that are recognized by the provincial or territorial Department of Education. They must take place in a classroom, and include a group component with a minimum of four students. This program is funded centrally by Human Resources Branch.

Contact: CIC.OLTaining-FormationLO.CIC@cic.gc.ca

Infrastructure Canada (INFC)

52. Language Training Guidelines

The Department has Language Training Guidelines, which outline the program and include an appendix with Second Language Evaluation (SLE) Testing to ensure that all employees have equal access to second language training and testing opportunities. It also ensures that employees are not SLE tested unnecessarily and do not congest the testing system or risk failing to obtain the levels required for their positions.

Melanie.Laflamme2@canada.ca, 613-941-3167

53. Second Language Training

The Human Resources Branch has put into place a second language training program for all employees, which includes group and individual language training. This program is funded by Human Resources, and participation is determined by the Department's Language Training Guidelines.

Melanie.Laflamme2@canada.ca, 613-941-3167

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED)

54. Brown Bag Lunch Sessions

In 2015–2016, four brown bag lunch sessions were organized where employees could practise their second language as guest speakers shared their life experiences: a former morning man at ICI Radio-Canada spoke about his career, a retired ISED employee spoke about being a living organ donor, an ISED employee shared her experience with the Syrian Refugee Operation, and an ISED employee hosted an interactive presentation on networking.

Annie.Gauvin@canada.ca, 613-859-1044

55. Departmental Directive on Second Language Training

ISED has issued a Directive on Second Language Training, which introduces a fair, transparent and consistent approach to second language training approval across the department. The directive provides criteria for approving language training, describes the responsibilities of managers and employees, and replaces other guidance documents on second language training that were previously being used in the department. All employee requests for second language training will be evaluated based on the criteria and priorities outlined in the directive.

Dominique.Jolicoeur@canada.ca, 343-291-3150

56. Discover Poster

A tabloid-size poster was developed featuring English- and French-speaking musicians. Each poster includes a quick response code (QR code) that can be used to listen to the artist's music and a short description to help listeners appreciate the culture behind the music. A new poster is produced every month.  

Annie.Gauvin@canada.ca, 613-859-1044

57. French at Your Fingertips

A colourful poster and magnet with links and quick response codes (QR codes) to four useful online tools were developed for learning and maintaining French as a second language. A version for English as a second language is being planned.

Annie.Gauvin@canada.ca, 613-859-1044

58. "Moment de français"

An activity was implemented in which a short French grammar question was circulated by e-mail on a daily basis to all employees who subscribed to the initiative. The answer, along with a brief explanation and a new question, were sent to all participants the following day. The questions and the explanations of the answers were taken from the Canada School of Public Service (CSPS) French language training materials. The aim was to provide employees with an opportunity to learn and practise their French regularly without taking too much time out of their work day. At one point, over 100 employees subscribed to the daily e-mail lesson.

Ann.Salvatore@canada.ca, 819-994-8270

59. Official Languages Pictionary

Employees play in teams. They start by writing out words and phrases in both official languages on a piece of paper. Then one person picks a piece of paper and shows it to the team's drawer. Employees have 30 seconds to draw and guess the word or phrase that is on the piece of paper by looking at the drawing.  Employees respond in the language of their choice. It is a fun and interactive activity for learning and practising a second language.

Louise.Boucher@canada.ca, 343-291-1835

60. Second Language Thursdays

The Department created Second Language Thursdays, which are held on the second Thursday of each month. The purpose of this initiative is to encourage employees who speak a second official language to use it all day, one Thursday per month. These days offer an additional opportunity to use one's second official language, learn new expressions and ensure that bilingualism continues to flourish in the workplace. In order to promote and facilitate the initiative, employees can print out postcards featuring the Department's official languages poster and put them up in their offices to let everyone know they are taking part in the initiative. Monthly reminders include suggested tools for facilitating learning. With the authorization of ISED, the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions transmitted the information and details regarding this initiative to the champions to allow them to implement it in their own organizations.

Roda.Muse@canada.ca, 343-291-3049 or Samantha.Moonsammy@canada.ca, 613-762-2819

61. Second Official Language Challenge

The Second Official Language Challenge is a calendar featuring 20 challenges (1 every 2 weeks) in both official languages. The challenges are simple activities that can be easily incorporated into daily routines. The goal is to encourage people to use their second language skills by performing various activities. Bi-monthly reminders are provided for the duration of the challenge.

Roda.Muse@canada.ca, 343-291-3049 or Samantha.Moonsammy@canada.ca, 613-762-2819 or Annie.Gauvin@canada.ca, 613-859-1044

62. Sector Linguistic Mentoring

Sectors and their business units are encouraged to create informal linguistic mentoring projects to support employees in maintaining and improving their oral communication skills in their second official language. To facilitate this, a one-page document setting out the key elements required to begin this type of project, a registration form, and a FAQ document were made available. With the authorization of ISED, the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions transmitted the information and details regarding this initiative to the champions so that they can implement it in their own organizations.

Roda.Muse@canada.ca, 343-291-3049 or Samantha.Moonsammy@canada.ca, 613-762-2819

63. "Some Tools to Help You" E-poster

The Department has developed an e-poster aimed at providing employees with easy, one-stop access to a variety of links that may be of help to them in learning a second official language or maintaining their fluency. With the authorization of ISED, the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions transmitted this e-poster to the official languages champions so that they can share it with the employees within their organizations.

Roda.Muse@canada.ca, 343-291-3049 or Samantha.Moonsammy@canada.ca, 613-762-2819

64. Talk the Talk – ISED's Language Column

The Department has developed a weekly language column that is shared with employees via its electronic newsletter. It consists of a series of illustrated linguistic expressions that play with words, "Talk the Talk." It is a fun way of encouraging second official language use, development and retention. With the authorization of ISED, the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions transmitted these linguistic expressions to the official languages champions on a weekly basis (from January 2016 to April 2017) so that they could distribute them to the employees in their organizations.

Roda.Muse@canada.ca, 343-291-3049 or Samantha.Moonsammy@canada.ca, 613-762-2819

65. "Taste of Culture" Cookbook Launch and La Semaine de la francophonie Celebration

In March 2016, roughly 100 employees participated in a "Taste of Culture" Cookbook Launch for the Semaine de la francophonie Celebration. Participants were able to taste samples of some of the recipes in the cookbook, as demonstrated by a professional chef, and listen to French music performed by a band that included an employee of the Department.

Annie.Gauvin@canada.ca, 613-859-1044

66. "Télé-midi"

"Télé-midi" is an 11-week initiative launched to assist staff with improving their French listening and conversation skills. A series of 45-minute brown bag sessions was held at lunchtime and featured the Radio-Canada program "Les Parents." Participants watched an episode followed by a discussion, in French, about the content. With the assistance of a moderator, participants were encouraged to discuss the story line and characters and to identify unfamiliar words and phrases.

Ann.Salvatore@canada.ca, 819-994-8270

67. Toastmasters – Odyssea

A special bilingual version of Toastmasters was created: Odyssea. Meetings are held at lunch hour every Thursday, and the goal is to develop the communication and leadership skills of participants in their first or second official language.

Contact: contact3221@toastmastersclubs.org

68. Video Testimonials from ISED Employees about Official Languages

Everyone learns new languages in their own way. To promote learning a second official language, the Department made four videos of employees who were willing to share their experiences of learning a second official language with all employees. The videos are a source of inspiration, motivation and encouragement for those wishing to learn a second official language or improve their fluency.

Roda.Muse@canada.ca, 343-291-3049 or Samantha.Moonsammy@canada.ca, 613-762-2819

Justice Canada

69. Competency Development Toolkit for Communicating in Your Second Official Language

This toolkit is a guide to various useful resources that directs employees and their managers in their search for learning tools and training for improving or maintaining their competencies in their second official language. The toolkit contains information on training, tools and resources to help employees develop and/or maintain their second official language competencies. It also describes the Public Service Commission's Second Language Evaluation test to help Justice Canada employees prepare for it.

Nadine.Lavallee@justice.gc.ca, 613-954-5612

70. National Capital Region Non-Statutory Language Training Program

These part-time sessions are designed to help employees improve or maintain their oral and/or written and/or reading comprehension skills at level X, A, B or C. Short-term sessions for oral proficiency are available in the spring, fall and winter, while workshops for grammar and oral proficiency, as well as semi-intensive sessions, are available in the summer.

Nadine.Lavallee@justice.gc.ca, 613-954-5612

Library and Archives Canada (LAC)

71. Language Training Program

LAC's Language Training Program offers part-time second language training sessions in the fall and winter. Thanks to technology, employees in the regional offices can participate in these sessions with their colleagues from the National Capital Region, providing an opportunity for interaction among employees from different regions. Although the regular program takes a break during the summer, a wide range of workshops on grammar, writing, reading, oral interaction, and verb tenses remain available. Practice workshops for the second language evaluation tests are also offered during the summer, as well as throughout the rest of the year. The Language Training Program also offers training to help employees maintain their second official language skills.

Claire.Lalonde@canada.ca, 613-797-3857

72. Language Twinning Program

The language twinning program is designed to help LAC employees with a level B, C or E in oral interaction improve and maintain their skills in their second official language. The program is open to all LAC employees, including those in the regional offices.

Claire.Lalonde@canada.ca, 613-797-3857

National Capital Commission (NCC)

73. Second Language Training Program

The NCC offers its employees a training program whose main objective is to allow employees to learn, develop and master the two official languages, English and French.

Mariline.Carriere@ncc-ccn.ca, 613-239-5678, ext. 5277

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

74. Agreement on Language Skills Transfer

The employee in language training and his/her manager establish a written agreement that identifies the expectations and obligations of each regarding the use of both official languages as languages of work. The agreement clearly states specific tasks and responsibilities when the employee must use his/her second official language and means taken by the manger to ensure his/her support.

Stephanie.Renaud@canada.ca, 613-878-3665

75. "Do you want to practice with me?" Poster

This poster was designed to promote the use of both official languages in the workplace. It clearly demonstrates that employees who display it in their offices wish to communicate in their second language.

Marie Madeleine Farma Chourouba, mariemadeleine.chourouba@canada.ca, 343-292-8455

76. French in Action (Language Training)

Part of the language-training curriculum is based on the learner's work description. Throughout his/her training, the learner develops his/her skills to concretely do his/her work in his/her second official language. Furthermore, the learner builds a "toolbox" which contains, for example, specific work-related vocabulary or communication strategies to help them transfer their language skills to the workplace.

Stephanie.Renaud@canada.ca, 613-878-3665

77. Language Training Centre

The NRCan Language School offers NRCan employees in the National Capital Region the opportunity to improve their second-language skills in order to achieve the B or C language proficiency level. By enabling employees to communicate in both official languages, the Department is investing in linguistic duality and placing value on bilingualism.

Stephanie.Renaud@canada.ca, 613-878-3665

78. Self-Study Centre

NRCan offers employees the opportunity to maintain or improve their knowledge of English or French through the self-study centre. The centre has a host of self-learning tools in both official languages. The centre's documentation has been updated and expanded to include the most recent self-learning language tools available. Employees can borrow books, CD-ROMs, audio material and reference documents for a period of two weeks. In addition, employees can meet with an on-site teacher, who can advise them on their choice of tools.

Stephanie.Renaud@canada.ca, 613-878-3665

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

79. Effective Language Training Practices: Online Tool for Federal Institutions

As part of a study published in September 2013 entitled Challenges: The New Environment for Language Training in the Federal Public Service, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has developed an interactive online language training tool. The tool highlights effective practices grouped into 12 categories, including roles and responsibilities, learning methods and language skills maintenance activities. This online tool has been created for individuals at all levels of the federal government and allows users to create their own personalized list of effective practices, simply by exploring various categories and then clicking and dragging their choices to their own language training model. The final product can be printed.

Danielle.Muise@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4686

80. Web Map of Second-Language Learning Opportunities at Canada's Universities

This map was developed following a study called "Two Languages, a World of Opportunities: Second language learning in Canada's universities." It lists the second language courses, courses taught in the second language, support programs, networking activities and exchange programs offered at Canadian universities. The map is designed especially for students, teachers and parents. Students who wish to continue learning their second language or to maintain their second-language skills can use it as a guide when deciding which university to attend.

Josee.Lamothe@clo-ocol.gc.ca, 819-420-4691

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada

81. Formal Process for Providing Access to Language Training

To pursue our commitment to ensure that Canadians are effectively served in both official languages, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada has developed Learning and Education Leave Guidelines that, along with our Learning Policy, provide a framework to support the acquisition of knowledge, skills and know-how by all employees and help create a competent, well-trained and professional workforce. The guidelines, which include a section dedicated to second language training, offer guiding principles and establish priorities that provide direction for decisions relevant to language training eligibility.  A Language Training Review Committee, made up of senior representatives of the Office, was also created to ensure that scarce resources for language training are most efficiently allocated across the entire Office. This approach establishes and formalizes the process for providing employees with access to language training, including for those who wish to maintain or improve their language skills in order to meet the language requirements of their bilingual positions, as well as those who wish to improve their proficiency in their second official language for career development purposes.

Frank.Lebouthillier@priv.gc.ca, 819-994-5543

Parks Canada

82. Official Languages Posters

The posters highlight the Agency's commitment to fostering and cultivating a respectful workplace conducive to the effective use of both official languages. Employees who want to become more proficient in their second official language may display the posters in their office on days when they feel comfortable with prompting their colleagues to speak to them in their second language.

Contact: LO-OL@pc.gc.ca

83. Téléfun

In January 2017, the Parks Canada Innovation Labs launched Téléfun, a language buddies pilot program. The aim of this program is to offer Parks Canada team members across the country an opportunity to practise their second language by partnering up with a colleague based on personal interests, in a friendly environment. Téléfun is an award-winning suggestion from a Beavers' Den event, an Innovation Lab where team members pitched ideas to improve language diversity in the workplace. Program participants will be provided with tips and resources to facilitate meaningful conversations. The buddies will meet every week for six weeks (by phone, by videoconference or in person) for 30 minutes.

Christiane.Arsenault@pc.gc.ca, 819-420-9436

Public Safety Canada

84. French Fridays

French Fridays were implemented across Public Safety Canada. In some offices, they involved conversing in French all day. In others, two-hour afternoon sessions were dedicated to learning and practising French in the workplace, Employees with various official languages skills met and had discussions focused on a specific theme. Other Employees who had more advanced skills or were fluently bilingual would coach and support the learners.

Annick.Paquin@canada.ca, 613-990-2491

85. Frunches

In the fall of 2011, Public Safety employees in the Department's Nova Scotia Region set up Frunches, i.e. lunches designed to encourage all employees at all levels to practise their second language in a relaxed atmosphere.

Michael.DeJong@canada.ca, 613-990-3629

86. In-House French Language Training

Public Safety organized an inaugural in-house French language training initiative in summer 2016. Approximately 45 employees participated. Students were first assessed for their current language level and were then placed in classes according to their level of proficiency. Participants spent three to six hours a week focused on overall French language development and preparation for language testing.

Matt.Emery@canada.ca, 613-991-7073

87. Official Languages Tools

The Official Languages Unit used the intranet web page to promote an initiative developed by the Official Languages Ambassador. The initiative encouraged employees to share, through GCpedia, free tools and practices that they were familiar with or found to be useful for maintaining and enhancing their second language levels. Every time an official languages initiative is promoted across the Public Service, the Official Languages Ambassador takes on an internal promotion role to inform employees and to contribute to the vitality of both official languages, thus helping to foster a workplace conducive to the use of English and French.

Annick.Paquin@canada.ca, 613-990-2491

Public Service Commission of Canada

88. In-house Non-Mandatory Second Language Training Program

This program incorporates second language learning, informal second language assessment and the maintenance of second language skills. Participants have the opportunity to practise their second language through in-house sessions and targeted workshops. Sessions are based on the needs of the participants and include oral, writing and reading elements. Groups are established based on informal assessments conducted by the language teachers.

Melanie.Moore@cfp-psc.gc.ca, 819-420-6614

89. Second Official Languages Retention Centre

Available on the Public Service Commission's intranet, the Retention Centre features strategies, tools and resources to help employees practise and maintain their second language proficiency.

Lyne.Vaillancourt@cfp-psc.gc.ca, 819-420-6628

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

90. Guideline on Language Training

This guideline sets out the guiding principles, the eligibility criteria and the terms and conditions which apply to language training within the Department. The guideline is designed to help refocus the responsibility for maintaining and developing employees' language skills (shared responsibility). Moreover, it aims at aligning employees' career aspirations with the organization's operational needs and helping ensure that the available language training financial resources are used in a fair and transparent manner in all sectors of the Department.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

91. Tips for Maintaining your Second Official Language

This small card contains tips and tricks to help employees maintain their second official language.

Contact: QuestionsLO.OLQueries@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

92. Accelerated English Language Training Program

The RCMP developed this training program to meet the specific needs of newly engaged unilingual Francophone members. This is a 13-week accelerated learning program, which takes place after the Cadet Training Program at Depot, in Regina. The curriculum for this training has a strong policing orientation, and language proficiency development is supported through practical policing scenario-based learning. This complements the existing English Second Language Training Program, which was developed and implemented in 2008. Both programs were designed to prepare Francophone members to work safely in their second official language.

Contact: DOL_DLO@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Shared Services Canada (SSC)

93. Linguistic Mentoring—Second Language Acquisition and Retention

The Human Resources and Workplace Directorate of SSC has initiated a Lunch & Learn program coordinated by volunteer mentors who facilitate the oral learning of the second language with a group of up to six learners per group at the B, C or E levels in oral French or English. The sessions are run in an informal way: sessions occur during lunches; each learner talks for a few minutes; the mentor then comments on structure, pronunciation and grammar; questions and discussion are encouraged; mentors switch between groups as the program progresses, allowing for different learner feedback. Each mentor brings his/her original approach to the learning experience (often bringing supplementary materials to the classes). Regional participants join by videoconference for each session. At the end of the ten-week program, mentors and learners are offered a Certificate of Recognition in appreciation for their participation, signed by SSC's official languages champions.

Martin.Parent@canada.ca, 613-415-7972

Statistics Canada

94. English and French as a Second Language Educational Toolboxes

Using your second official language at every opportunity will help you communicate with more ease and confidence. To help with this, Statistics Canada has developed an English as a Second Language Toolbox and a French as a Second Language Toolbox. These toolboxes provide learners of all levels with a wide variety of resources, ranging from pronunciation to grammar and verb tenses, vocabulary, expressions, and communications strategies.

Nathalie.Chenier@canada.ca, 613-371-1447

95. Internal Language Training Program

The Agency's on-site Language Training Centre provides Statistics Canada employees and, occasionally, employees of other departments with an enriching and rewarding experience through its English as a Second Language and French as a Second Language courses designed to meet statutory requirements and support career development (part-time training, full-time training, Second Language Evaluation preparatory workshops and self-paced learning). The Centre's team of professionals provides customized service to guide employees in all aspects of training: planning, pedagogical advice, progress reports, success strategies, information kit for learners and liaison with managers.

Nathalie.Chenier@canada.ca, 613-371-1447

96. Language Teletraining Program in Regional Offices

This in-house learning solution gives regional Statistics Canada employees access to the same part-time career development language courses as employees in the National Capital Region (NCR). The courses are given in a virtual classroom setting, with the teacher at Statistics Canada's Language Training Centre in the NCR and the students connected via videoconferencing. Thanks to WebEx, the Public Services and Procurement Canada videoconferencing tool, the teletraining program has proven to be very effective.

Nathalie.Chenier@canada.ca, 613-371-1447

97. Leaflet on the Second-Language Proficiency Levels

Knowing the second-language proficiency levels allows employees to develop them with more ease and confidence. The Language Training and Testing Section has developed a leaflet for each second language proficiency test (reading, written expression and oral proficiency) to help employees become familiar with them. Based on qualification standards defined by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, each leaflet provides a detailed explanation of the general second-language proficiency levels (levels A, B and C) associated with positions that require the use of both English and French.

Nathalie.Chenier@canada.ca, 613-371-1447

Translation Bureau

98. Language Training in Canada

This section of the Language Portal of Canada lists a collection of Canadian websites that deal with such language training topics as learning or teaching English as a first or second language, learning or teaching French as a second language, and sign languages. Users will find lists of online tools and reference works, teaching institutions and organizations working in these fields.

Contact: noslangues.ourlanguages@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

Transport Canada—Atlantic Region

99. "Lingo Wednesdays" / "Mercredi en mots" E-mails

The goal of "Lingo Wednesdays" is to support employees' efforts to maintain and develop their second official language by encouraging them to practise it. In this regard, all Transport Canada Atlantic Region employees receive a weekly e-mail featuring advice, tips and games that enable them to increase or reinforce their linguistic knowledge, thus improving their abilities and self-confidence. Wednesday is the day on which employees are encouraged to speak their second official language with each other in the hallways, while on break and during meetings. Of course, they can always speak their second official language on other days of the week, but they are encouraged to make a special effort on Wednesdays.

Ginette.Roy@tc.gc.ca, 506-851-4614

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

100. Centralized Language Training Program

This program is based on various methods and on an integrated approach that includes traditional courses such as full-time and part-time group training and summer full-time sessions, in either English or French as a second language at the beginner, intermediate and advanced levels. Part-time sessions during the day and evening are also offered, and courses on English or French grammar are made available. Employees who wish to maintain their skills in their second official language may participate in part-time group sessions of one or two hours weekly. These sessions provide informal opportunities to communicate in one's second language. The Secretariat provides employees with material for self-directed learning and skills retention, such as computer-assisted training modules, practice booklets, preparation booklets for the second language evaluation, grammar books, dictionaries, and reading books.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

101. Word of the Month

The objective of this initiative is to help employees improve their written and verbal communication. Each month, we feature a new word or expression, along with its pronunciation, synonyms and one or two examples of its use in a sentence.

Contact: tbsol-sctlo@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD)

102. Official Languages Training Policy

WD's Guidelines for Learning and Professional Development include guidance on managing training related to staff that do not have a statutory obligation to take language training under the Public Service Official Languages Appointment Regulations.

Patrick.Faulkner@canada.ca, 780-495-2992

Writing Tools and Tips

Air Canada

1. Aviaterm, Antidote and Usito

Aviaterm is Air Canada's terminology database containing thousands of terms related to the aviation industry, available to all employees on the portal. Air Canada also gives access to Antidote (French correction tool) and Usito (French usage dictionary). As well, all employees have access to numerous online dictionaries and quizzes related to English and French writing.

Émilie.Haché@aircanada.ca, 514-422-6259

2. Linguistic Tips

The Linguistic Tips section of Air Canada's intranet is designed to re-establish good language habits by providing employees with the appropriate terminology to use in both official languages while keeping the workplace in mind. It runs regularly in the Company's daily bulletin and on the employee portal.

Danielle.Ferrante@aircanada.ca, 604-270-5557

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

3. Correspondence Guide/Guide de correspondance

This guide includes information on general style preferences, usage and protocol as well as sample presidential and ministerial correspondence. This document is useful for employees preparing letters or briefing notes for ACOA in English. This document is available on the Agency's intranet site.

Cynthia.Shannon@canada.ca, 506-227-5359 or Caroline.Goguen@canada.ca, 506-227-7261

4. Did you know…? / Saviez-vous que…?

These documents are a compilation of articles written by the English or French editor over the years. They include writing grammar and/or language tips to assist ACOA employees in the preparation of clear and concise written materials. They are available on the Agency's intranet site.

Cynthia.Shannon@canada.ca, 506-227-5359 or Luc.Belzile@canada.ca, 506-452-3185 or Danie.Landry@canada.ca, 506-871-7496

5. Writing for ACOA

This document is ACOA's English editor's reference guide, therefore it exists in English only. It contains general writing guidelines, grammar, spelling and style used by ACOA. It is also used by the editor to provide guidance to employees and external writers preparing reports and documents for the Agency. This guide can be consulted by contacting the English editor.

Cynthia.Shannon@canada.ca, 506-227-5359

Canada Economic Development Agency for the Quebec Regions (CED)

6. English and French Writing Checklist

This tool provides simple spelling and writing rules (abbreviations, figures and numbers, problem cases, punctuation, etc.). The document is available on the CED's intranet site.

Josee.Duchesneau@canada.ca, 514-283-9605

Canadian Heritage

7. Canadian Heritage English Writing and Style Guide

This guide has a French equivalent, the Guide de rédaction et de style en français à Patrimoine canadien. The objective of the two documents is to promote the correct use of language and ensure consistent style within the Department.

Manon.Cote@canada.ca, 819-934-8356 or Marie-Anne.Marin@canada.ca, 819-994-4239

Correctional Service Canada (CSC)

8. Word of the Week

CSC's Word of the Week initiative to help enhance staff's knowledge of correct vocabulary in the second language, particularly terminology in the correctional and public service domain, was launched in 2013. The word bank is fed by CSC staff, and the internal newsletter "This Week at CSC" features a word or expression once a week, along with its pronunciation, synonyms and one or two examples of its use in a sentence. This initiative has recently become a monthly issuance, instead of weekly.

Veronique.Moguo@csc-scc.gc.ca, 613-992-7814

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED)

9. French Support Working Group

The mandate of the Canadian Intellectual Property Office's French Support Working Group is to provide, upon request, expertise on linguistic questions in French, in a very specialized context of science, technology and the law. The Group reviews and validates the use of French in the employee work tools, internal and external communications, and web pages of the Patent Branch and the Patent Appeal Board to ensure language quality and consistency. Revision of the French focuses on language accuracy in documents. In parallel, the Group is developing a terminological database that facilitates and encourages writing, in both French and English. This initiative was awarded the Public Service Award of Excellence in 2016 for the Official Languagescategory.

Marie.Letellier@canada.ca, 819-997-2941

Statistics Canada

10. Statistics Canada Style Guide

This guide and its French equivalent, the Guide de rédaction de Statistique Canada, were developed to answer common questions about grammar, style and page layout that arise when writing texts. Using real-life examples from the field of statistics, these guides help ensure consistent language use across the Agency.

Sally.Fletcher@canada.ca, 613-617-8839 or Julie.Morin@canada.ca, 613-716-3271

11. Subcommittee on Terminological and Linguistic Standardization

The mandate of this subcommittee is to standardize the Agency's terminology and usage in both official languages to improve the quality and homogeneity of written communications. It reports to Statistics Canada's Official Languages Committee.

Christine.Leger@canada.ca, 613-762-4096

12. term@stat

This terminology databank contains over 25,000 English and French terms specific to the Agency's activities and is available to all of its employees. This tool helps foster terminological standardization, thus improving written communications at Statistics Canada.

Christine.Leger@canada.ca, 613-762-4096

Translation Bureau

13. Language Portal of Canada

This website is a one-stop shop for a large number of Canadian language tools and resources developed not only by the federal government but also by provincial and territorial governments, universities and associations. The Portal gives access to Canadian online language resources, including quizzes, articles written by our contributors in the language field and writing tips. And with the Language Navigatorthe user can search simultaneously in 16 writing tools and the hundreds of language resources on the Portal. Whether it's a question of grammar, style, usage, punctuation or vocabulary, the Language Portal of Canada can help all public servants communicate and write more effectively in both official languages.

Contact: noslangues.ourlanguages@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

14. Language Quizzes

These language quizzes allow federal employees to put their knowledge of English and French to the test. Some questions are easy, but this can be deceiving, as others require a bit more concentration.

Contact: noslangues.ourlanguages@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

15. Linguistic Recommendations and Reminders

Consistency is key when communicating with the Canadian public. The Bureau therefore provides linguistic recommendations and reminders on various topics to help standardize vocabulary, spelling and usage in government documents. These recommendations and reminders can be found in Writing Tips.

Contact: Bureaudelatraduction.TranslationBureau@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

16. TERMIUM Plus®

Managed by the Bureau, TERMIUM Plus® is the Government of Canada's terminology and linguistic data bank. It contains nearly 3.75 million terms, most of which are in English and French but approximately 225,000 of which are in Spanish and 24,000 of which are in Portuguese. In addition to providing the latest terminology in nearly all fields, TERMIUM Plus® can find equivalents for acronyms, initialisms or abbreviations in either official language.

Contact: Bureaudelatraduction.TranslationBureau@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

17. Translation Bureau Publications

Over the years, the Bureau has developed over 600 glossaries and vocabularies containing terms specific to departments' various fields of activity. Some recent glossaries include the Government of Canada Workplace Charitable Campaign Glossary, the Alternate Dispute Resolution Glossary and the Workplace Mental Health Glossary. The most recent ones can be consulted online.

Contact: Bureaudelatraduction.TranslationBureau@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

18. Writing Tools

Writing Tips, HyperGrammar2, Clefs du français pratique, the Dictionnaire des cooccurrences and ConjugArt are just a few of the writing tools provided by the Translation Bureau. Offering solutions to many language problems in English and French, the various tools are grouped together on one page of the Language Portal of Canada. They are arranged so that when you select the type of language problem that interests you (grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, etc.), the tools best able to meet your needs are highlighted.

Contact: noslangues.ourlanguages@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca, 1-855-997-3300

 

To share your accomplishments and success stories for the next edition of this Collection, please contact:

Diane Lalonde-Spring
National Coordinator
Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions

Diane.Lalonde-Spring@tbs-sct.gc.ca
613-668-9617

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